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CoachMattC
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I posted this elsewhere but thought it fit in good here so here is how we worked on this stuff daily. Joe alludes to it for a minute in the video. I call it "Tap Dancing" and as written its specific to Joe's stuff. But, take the idea and tweak if if you prefer load steps or whatever.

We start with the kids lined up next to a sidewalk or basketball court, anything with a hard surface on one side and grass on the other side. They put the outside edge of their right foot up against the sidewalk, but still in the grass. Their left foot is also in the grass so both feet start in the grass. It's the first time doing this so we go through always stepping with the playside foot. Start with telling them to step with the right foot then stop that and just say 24 or 23. They get in their stance and move the right foot (which is up against the sidewalk) from the grass onto the sidewalk so it makes a loud sound while bringing their hands to their hips (gunslinger position). I tell them to listen to the sound on every rep and we want it to be one sound, not a bunch of little sounds at different times. We then rep it a bunch and work on not raising their head when they step (knee to chest).

To focus on keeping them low we will go immediately from the one step/gunslinger position back down to their stance. So it starts off with the full cadence (Tigers, Down, Set, Go) but then the rest of the reps (usually 5-8 times) start on Set and they go directly back down to 3 point. I learned this from Michael when he pointed out how many guys are accidentally teaching their kids to stand up after a rep by having them start all the way from the beginning.

Next we spin them around 180 degrees and do the same drill with their left foot being the first step. Again, have them focus on making one loud clap of thunder a group (foot hitting the sidewalk) and not a bunch of quiet raindrops on a tin roof. After this we move onto the second step. Now they face the sidewalk with their feet in the grass but their toes are touching the edge of the sidewalk and their down hand is on the concrete. We show them how the first step is now a quiet step (lateral step stays in the grass) and the second step is the loud step (split the crotch step has to hit the concrete and make noise). We also marry the second step up with the chest punch (thumbs together and look thru the window). We rep this the same way as above, first rep is full cadence and the consecutive reps are all from set so they go from the second step position straight back down to their stance. We do this going left and right about 15-20 times each. Once they know the drill you can get a lot more reps in a short amount of time.

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


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Coach Correa
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Heeeeyyyyyyy! Why not a bad AYF practice?! 😛

Because he an AYF Guy Lol...

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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Huskerprice
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Topic starter  

Do you have EDD's that you use to keep on top of your basic fundamentals or ones that you use often?


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MHcoach
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HP

EDD's aren't every other day, they are for every day.

We even do our EDD's  as part of our pregame warm up. I often sound like a broken record samying the same things from day 1 to the championship.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Huskerprice
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Topic starter  

Can you give one example of a EDD period for every Indy and would they be doing these at the same time? Are there some they do as a team?

At the youth level do you have Tackle EDD's and do you do them as a team?


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PSLCOACHROB
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Do you have EDD's that you use to keep on top of your basic fundamentals or ones that you use often?

The way you worded this forces me to say that edds are all about keeping on top of basic skills. I think you know that. Each position group will have their own set of edds and they will vary with scheme. Some can be team wide though and that rings more true in youth. Blocking and tackling edds for the whole team is a great approach. I bet Joe talks about his Miami tackling circuit now. 😉


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dollar
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Something I took form Joe was his EDD of Hawk Tackling from the knees.

Coaches called Hit, then Hit Hands, then Hit Hands Hips.  Three easy steps.

This was the first thing we did EVERY PRACTICE in our tackling circuit.

We did this on the first day of practice until the very last practice.

Even when pressed for time we never eliminated the circuit.

We were a much better tackling team this year-especially our middle core of players-the Studs are going to tackle well anyway.


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Huskerprice
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I would do Dave Cisar's form fit angle tackling drill everyday. When you did Joe's tackling drill would you take them to the ground? Was this Pete Carol's Hawk tackling you are referring to?

Thanks.


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dollar
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Yes.

In progression.

First-Hit.

Make sure the "runner" is standing close to the tackler who is on his knees.  Too far and the tackler has too lean and  he won't be able to load his hips in the third step.
In this step the tackler is just getting head up and out of the tackle and getting his shoulder in position for the the next step.  The other important part of this Hit step is to load the arms down by his waist as and behind his back-kind of like a ski jumper after he takes off.

As a note we use Load, Explode, Go in conjunction with Hit,Hands, Hips as we are also teaching LEG  in blocking drills.

Second-Hit Hands

Same as above but now adding Hands.  This is exploding the hands-coaches stand there and say they want to hear contact i.e. pads colliding-and then wrapping and grabbing each hand behind runner around the knees or thighs.

Third-Hit Hands Hips
This is the hardest part for the kids to get and takes time and repetitions so don't give up on the drill-exploding the hips up and out-and rolling the runner to the ground.  If they do not fire off hips they have trouble with this step.

And yes taking to the ground, even on days we are Helmet only.

Joe has a link somewhere on here showing his kids doing this drill in shorts and helmets.


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MHcoach
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Our EDD's are a small core group of drills to emphasize fundamentals. Each position group will have 3 or 4 drills they should be able to get done in 10 minutes. We incorporate them into our pregame warm up.

RB's & WR's will do the hand off snake while QB's do their ignition drills.

Then WR's will go to the QB's for PatnGo.

The RB's will do Power run & High & Tight.

The Oline will do first step second step & pulls.

That is just the Offensive side.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Dimson
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Joe, would you use the same steps for down blocking?


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MHcoach
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C

Gap Scheme (down blocking) is the exact opposite of Zone Blocking so we teach it exactly the same.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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PSLCOACHROB
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Not a zone guy but I think a zone step has the toes pointing forward correct? For down blocking I always teach toes pointing towards the target. The pointing of the toes towards the aiming point helps to open the hips to the direction we want to drive the opponent. Slight difference and maybe I'm wrong about the zone step. Heck, I might be wrong about the down step.  😛


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MHcoach
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R

You are right for your offense. Remember you are a no split guy vs a wide split. Add to the equation we recess our O line as much as possible. The depth means the second step now points to the defender. When we were an I team we even taught our slower linemen to step with a 90 degree turn. The flat step for us allows our guys to adjust on the fly with the added depth.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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PSLCOACHROB
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What always confused me about that is when yhe 2nd foot hits the ground the first foot is pointed to the goal line and the second is angled. To me that creates a balance and drive problem. Am I envisioning that wrong or is it not a big deal.


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