Notifications
Clear all

Platooning

Page 2 / 2

mahonz
(@mahonz)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 23090
 

CnD

Here is an example of how our games often go. We beat our arch rivals last season 43-42 on a 2 pt conversion in the last minute of the game.

Joe

No guts no glory. Love it !

What is beautiful, lives forever.


ReplyQuote
MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 7637
 

M

Even better it was on the Statue of Liberty, that I posted. It was a Frosh running the ball. I made the call & it was the longest play ever.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


ReplyQuote
Dimson
(@dimson)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 7457
 

C

No we always played their sides.

Joe

So then the second best lineman should be the left tackle?


ReplyQuote
MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 7637
 

C

Not always the case. The Right Tackle & Right Tight end then the guards. You almost start out being right handed then develop the left side.

Usually the second FB starts at a Guard spot. After you determine who is the Right T & TE then you fit your next best where they fit.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


ReplyQuote
blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
Silver
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 847
 

Hey Joe, how do you guys decide who plays offense or defense?  Is the entire coaching staff involved, do the players have a say?

We get the whole coaching staff together and hold a draft.

Offense gets the #1 and #2 picks to select QB and C.  Defense gets the next 2.

Ideally, we'd like to totally 2 platoon, but we never have the numbers to allow that at the skill positions.  We do try to 2 platoon the lines because if linemen play both ways, they tend to take plays off on offense when they're tired.


ReplyQuote
blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
Silver
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 847
 

Power I.

For me, your top athlete should be TB in this offense since he'll be featured.  You will also need a good C.  Those should be top priority.  Then QB is 3rd.

WR in that offense can be whoever your 11th best player is, since he will barely touch the ball, if at all.


ReplyQuote
MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 7637
 

A

Usually I am in agreement with your posts; however my experience has been different than the post above. Quite often our best athlete hasn't been the TB, the TB is our best RB. This often a mistake I see youth coaches make where they simply take their fastest player & put him at TB. I need a TB who can run hard & stick a foot in the ground & get vertical. Those fast players sometimes simply want to bounce everything.

This is not say we didn't the fastest player the ball, we just were creative in how & when we did it.

The other issue is a coach picking his players position before seeing them in action. I always needed to see a player live before I ever settled positions.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


ReplyQuote
Dimson
(@dimson)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 7457
 

I am not sure what players I am going to have as I have no idea who is returning from the previous 10U team(assuming that is who I coach this year, that is the plan but it is always subject to change.) For my fastest guy, I plan on that being my WB as he will be running the 44 and that needs to hit quickly and on a straight path. We will most likely have 3 2-way starters depending on the size of the team.


ReplyQuote
blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
Silver
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 847
 

A

Usually I am in agreement with your posts; however my experience has been different than the post above. Quite often our best athlete hasn't been the TB, the TB is our best RB. This often a mistake I see youth coaches make where they simply take their fastest player & put him at TB. I need a TB who can run hard & stick a foot in the ground & get vertical. Those fast players sometimes simply want to bounce everything.

This is not say we didn't the fastest player the ball, we just were creative in how & when we did it.

The other issue is a coach picking his players position before seeing them in action. I always needed to see a player live before I ever settled positions.

Joe

We don't disagree here.

I don't think the best athlete is necessarily your fastest player.  He's just the one who can do the most with the ball in his hands.  I've coached on several teams where the fastest player unfortunately spent a lot of his time on the bench because he was just too unreliable/fragile/undisciplined to be a workhorse.

Obviously, you can't just pencil a kid in at a position and leave him there without actually watching him play.  But after a few days, you should have a feel for who your studs are--then you try him at TB.  If you try a kid there and he can't hack it, then you find somewhere else to put him.  I do feel it's important to try putting your best athlete in the key spot in your offense, though.

I remember as a player, I had a teammate who was 6'3" 200lbs, tough as nails, and ran 4.6.  We were a SBV team and he had spent 2 seasons at TE because that's a key position in the offense and he looked the part.  Unfortunately, we were atrocious at throwing the ball--we completed 9/110 passes that year, so he never got to do anything with the ball in his hands from that spot.  Finally, at 0-6 after 6 straight blowouts and with 4 games to go, our HC switched us to the Wishbone and put that kid at TB.  His first game he carried it 6 times for 190 yards and 4 TDs and we won.  He went on to lead us in rushing for the season in just 4 games and then led us again the following season.  That one move instantly made us a much more competitive team.


ReplyQuote
MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 7637
 

A

I think this is an area that many coaches are weak at. Putting players into the right slot is really an art. Too often we play teams & my thought afterwards is wow I wish we had ## he would be a $$ for us.

I used to joke around that I could pick where a player will play as they walked in the door. Pigeon Toed & bow legged that's my TB.

The real issue is what they do live. There were several coaches here last season that picked their TB before they ever got in pads & mid way through the season realized it was a mistake. I think they hurt themselves by not having competition & never seeing what others could do. Here in FL we see a lot of speed, but the TB is always something special.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


ReplyQuote
dollar
(@dollar)
Bronze
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 128
 

MH Coach?
How do you find the kid that will run hard and tough in Youth ball?
I am coaching 7th grade/12U this year.

In our three helmet only practices I let everyone tryout for any position and then I cull down to the kids I think can play RB based on speed and agility based on races, agilility drills and the gauntlet drill.

Then on the first day of full pads I get those kids who we think could play RB and we simply line them up, running back vs tackler, three yards apart,  one on one and let RB try and run over the defender.

This tells me who can run hard and tough enough to play RB.

Can you tell what you do to find this out?


ReplyQuote
MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 7637
 

Dollar

First is by tackling drills like you said. The other thing is teaching a player how to run behind his pads. Then a good old fashioned Oklahoma drill. They are probably half a dozen tackling drills we do & watch as every player gets a chance to run.

Tailbacks are a funny thing, while one of the first things I look for is a player who can get behind his pads; I also look for the player who has a burst. I have had great TB's who ran more upright than I liked, none the less they were great TB's.

The other issue is the offense you are running. A great TB maybe a slashing type runner.

In youth I believe it's important to run 1/2 line drills & see who gets vertical.

Over all, I believe it's important to see as many players run the ball early to determine who will be the best. Then coach him up. Work on the ability to take a hand off, ball security is a matter of coaching. Once I determine who is the RB's on a team then I can jump cuts, spin & win, & drill for explosiveness.

Hope that helps.

Joe 

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2
Share: