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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Mike

That's why I really believe finding the TB is an art & not a science. I also believe how you coach them up makes a difference, when I see a great back with bad fundamentals it makes me crazy. How often do we see the really fast kids run with the ball swinging off his body? Grabbing at the hand off, never securing the ball, having the ball in the wrong arm; all are signs of no coaching.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Mike

That's why I really believe finding the TB is an art & not a science. I also believe how you coach them up makes a difference, when I see a great back with bad fundamentals it makes me crazy. How often do we see the really fast kids run with the ball swinging off his body? Grabbing at the hand off, never securing the ball, having the ball in the wrong arm; all are signs of no coaching.

Joe

Joe

Here is an excellent example of what you are talking about. This is not a zone scheme but gives everyone a good idea of why monuments and vision are so critical.

I posted this in another Thread but it will be helpful here.

Attached are 4 clips....the same exact play calls vs two different teams. The play calls were also back to back with two different running backs each time and you can see the difference.

Number 8 in the first clip example fits the TB mold to the letter. Big and really fast with tenacity. He is pushing 100 pounds as a 10 year old.  Number 5 does not fit that mold because of his size. He is about 75 pounds as a 10 year old. YET...he runs the football with all the proper mechanics and vision. In his first clip he throws down two stiff arms while properly changing hands and protecting MY football. Number 8 was a rookie but ran thru the same drills in practice as Number 5 yet the results are night and day. Number 8 may never become a TB because he cant seem to get out of his own way. He is also runs track in the Spring.  Number 5 has all the necessary tools because he is very coach-able and has developed his skills.

So...never judge a book by its cover.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Mike

Here is some Zone highlights from 2012. I used this for the Clinic in Chicago, this was from the small prep school. The amazing thing is the Oline is really horrible.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Mike

Here is some Zone highlights from 2012. I used this for the Clinic in Chicago, this was from the small prep school. The amazing thing is the Oline is really horrible.

Joe

Joe

Heck yes.

Another good point. If you are the OL Coach standing there on your practice field during the Dog Days of August and think....this is what I have to work with?...don't worry. As every day goes by you will be creating better blockers faster due to the nature of how you practice. This goes back to your earlier statement...with zone you dont care where the D aligns because your kids still quickly know who to block. This alone saves a ton of practice time so you can work on fundamentals.

This really shocked me the first year I coached zone. I almost had time to spare as the season progressed.

Here is a good example. I was able to teach two popular schemes in one season.

I coached a team of 7th graders. We ran the Flexbone. Most of these kids were rookies. I coached zone for the dive keep option and TKO for the counters. We read the EMOL or the OLB depending on the front.

It took me about 4 weeks during pre season to really get them executing a half way decent zone....which also married up with a pretty good slide protection scheme for passing...as far as practice time was concerned.  I never really got a halfway decent TKO scheme going that entire season even though by mid season TKO got 50% more time than anything else. In defense of TKO...I didn't flip the OL. I really should have. We were fully ambidextrous and that was tough on the kids with all the pulling. Still...side by side...TKO is far more difficult to teach over zone. Not even close.

With zone...being ambidextrous is no big deal at all. 

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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WBCoach
(@rstockwell)
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Joe great job on the pp. Will you be coming out with some DVDs to go along with your pp to better teach the concepts?

Team work: good as gold


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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WB

That is the thought process, but it has been the thought process for over 5 years now. It seems I never have time to get them done. I am always available for clinics.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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Chris

Hardly random, & perhaps the best Youth PaP, for 11's & up. PAW (Post and Wheel) concept, Y is running a post (typo there) this is a presnap read. At our level our QB is checking that tube for a collision player, at the youth level we simply teach MOFC & outside leverage throw the Post. Now for the nuts & bolts of the Concept, after the Flash fake & a 3 step drop QB peaks the wheel, this is where we want the ball to go. Vs M2M we should have a mismatch, Vs Zone cover 3 did the corner slide inside with the post, vs cover 2 Safety held by the Post. The Dig by X is our "Rush route", everything should be cleared by the Post & the Go.

In 1 play you have everything you need for a deep concept. I have taught noodle arm small QB's to throw the Wheel, the Post & the Dig require a little more ability, but not a laser arm.

Joe

Any issue with an on the line receiver running the wheel or does wheel always need to be off?

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Greg

If #2 is a TE then sure. Originally I ran the concept from the I with a TE & a Flanker.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Moore40
(@moore40)
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I am just letting you know I am stealing the s*^t out of your zone teaching philosophy. I will give you all the credit but it is going down almost word for word the way you stated it. LOL Thanks for this PPT.

Joe

"It's easy to have faith in yourself and have discipline when you're a winner, when you're number one. What you got to have is faith and discipline when you're not a winner" - Vince Lombardi


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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M

Thank You. It's actually something that has developed over the years. I have worked with some fine coaches, so it's not mine alone. The best part is, it is simple to teach yet complex enough to grow as your players develop. Sometimes it takes to the second or third game before Zone really becomes effective.

I can honestly say I have never had an original idea, everything we do I stole from someone else. My theory is always steal from the best. Most of what I do is field tested so it has real life credibility.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Bruceja
(@bruceja)
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Do yall ever move the H back inside the tackle for kick outs and stuff?


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Do yall ever move the H back inside the tackle for kick outs and stuff?

B

The simple answer is yes. We move our H Back inside outside depending on the play, the front , & the opponent.

Joe

http://www.hudl.com/athlete/3894342/highlights/310673375/v2

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Coach Correa
(@coach-correa)
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Mike

Here is some Zone highlights from 2012. I used this for the Clinic in Chicago, this was from the small prep school. The amazing thing is the Oline is really horrible.

Joe

Nasty

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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Dimson
(@dimson)
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Nasty

Yeah, he had some pretty decent RBs. But as you can see, his line didn't block anybody, lol.


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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The interesting thing was we had 19 football players on that team. Two of the Oline were true freshman, one was 155 lbs. The Hback was a true freshman weighing 145 lbs. Those players played with an incredible amount of heart & determination. The QB, a great kid, was as big and slow as any lineman we had.

SO, when the question comes up about what is needed to run our schemes; the best answer is live bodies.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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