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Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
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I personally stress the relationship of the elbow to the shoulder quite a bit.  The elbow must be even with or slightly above the shoulder to allow then to use their whole arm to throw. If the elbow is below their shoulder they're simply trying to "Muscle" the ball forward and putting a huge strain on their shoulder!  The harder they try to throw it to get distance or velocity the larger the strain on the shoulder. 

That fact doesnt matter if its a football or Baseball. 

try it sitting in front of your computer.  Lower your elbow below your shoulder and practice a simple toss.  Where do you feel it most?  Now do same with the elbow even or higher do you feel the same strain in your shoulder.  I hope not. 

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Topic starter  

S

I have posted many times the 2 most common mistakes for a Youth QB are low elbow & breaking their wrist. When I watch video of QB's throwing it often boggles my mind how often I see the same thing.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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CoachOCD
(@coachocd)
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breaking wrist means to bend wrist?


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Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
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Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 7683
 

Pronating does not necessarily mean they "break" their wrist over or under as they do then they throw (Pitch) a baseball.  We "Are Not" trying to induce the ball to move as you would with a pitch. 

Will there be some "Break" of the wrist...?  Sure! But it should be post release not prior to and significantly less "wrist action" is required.

  😉

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Topic starter  

O

A QB's wrist should remain in a convex position. If it goes concave that means it broke. Take your right hand & place it in front of you, thumb up. Move your fingers towards the left(convex), now move them to the right(concave). As a QB throws the ball his thumb will come down, if it breaks too early or late the ball will wobble when comes out.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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CoachOCD
(@coachocd)
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thanks Joe

never got to great detail coaching a QB, I hear thats where the devil be........argghhh


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Topic starter  

O

Coaching QB's is difficult because the easy thing is to point out all a players faults. The poor player winds up with information overload & most times they take the wrong thing away from it. I start slow & usually build them from the ground up. The feet are so often overlooked & cause more problems than you can count. It's a position that you need a great understanding of exactly what you are trying get the player to do.

My first few years as a HC I was lucky to have one of our QB's who was very successful as our QB coach. I had been a DC prior so I was more of a defensive guy. When he left I spent a lot of time clinicing & going to college coaches to become a better QB coach. I was lucky enough to learn from coaches as Spurrier, Raymond, Davis, & Reaves. After a while I guess I understood what needed to be done.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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CoachMattC
(@coachmattc)
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O

Coaching QB's is difficult because the easy thing is to point out all a players faults. The poor player winds up with information overload & most times they take the wrong thing away from it. I start slow & usually build them from the ground up. The feet are so often overlooked & cause more problems than you can count. It's a position that you need a great understanding of exactly what you are trying get the player to do.

My first few years as a HC I was lucky to have one of our QB's who was very successful as our QB coach. I had been a DC prior so I was more of a defensive guy. When he left I spent a lot of time clinicing & going to college coaches to become a better QB coach. I was lucky enough to learn from coaches as Spurrier, Raymond, Davis, & Reaves. After a while I guess I understood what needed to be done.

Joe

So true. I've been trying to learn this stuff from Joe for the last few years. I think the most important this I've done in that time to help my QB's is focus on what I can fix and leave other things alone. My strength has always been as a OL coach, so I focused on my QB's feet above all else since I knew I was very comfortable teaching that stuff. We did some things with their throwing motion, but the emphasis was always on the feet. It made a huge difference. Ideally I would have the same kid for multiple seasons and continue to build, but that is usually not the case. Sometimes I had to start on August 1st and get them up to speed in three weeks then they graduate up to HS in October.

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


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