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Quick Game Concepts & Teaching

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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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There has been several posts where talking about Quick Game has come up(GP's marrying concepts, 32 Wedge on the Coxbox). Here is some of the basics & how I teach it.

Slants- This is 2x2 & all receivers running Slants. Years ago I can remember sitting down with a coach & going over this concept. He jumped up & said no one does this. The funny thing was ESPN had highlights on as he was saying it.

In our offense this concept is all about leverage. We teach our QB to simply throw to the best receiver with the best leverage.

Slant Arrow- This is perhaps my favorite Youth Concept. Outside receiver runs a slant, inside receiver runs an Arrow. We teach our QB to identify the Flat defender & throw off him accordingly. Now VS C2 the flat defender is the CB he usually has outside leverage so the slant should be good. VS C3 the OLB or SS is the Flat defender, so we throw off him.

Hitches- We can run hitches from any formation, we just coach the receivers to check their spacing. This is again a throw about leverage.

Hoss- Hitches outside Seams inside. This concept is a favorite of the Patriots, Google Hoss Y Juke. Here again its all about  leverage & the take off's.

This is somewhere to start. Let's remember we are talking quicks here. 3 steps UTC, Catch Cock Throw direct snap.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
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There has been several posts where talking about Quick Game has come up(GP's marrying concepts, 32 Wedge on the Coxbox). Here is some of the basics & how I teach it.

Slants- This is 2x2 & all receivers running Slants. Years ago I can remember sitting down with a coach & going over this concept. He jumped up & said no one does this. The funny thing was ESPN had highlights on as he was saying it.

In our offense this concept is all about leverage. We teach our QB to simply throw to the best receiver with the best leverage.

Slant Arrow- This is perhaps my favorite Youth Concept. Outside receiver runs a slant, inside receiver runs an Arrow. We teach our QB to identify the Flat defender & throw off him accordingly. Now VS C2 the flat defender is the CB he usually has outside leverage so the slant should be good. VS C3 the OLB or SS is the Flat defender, so we throw off him.

Hitches- We can run hitches from any formation, we just coach the receivers to check their spacing. This is again a throw about leverage.

Hoss- Hitches outside Seams inside. This concept is a favorite of the Patriots, Google Hoss Y Juke. Here again its all about  leverage & the take off's.

This is somewhere to start. Let's remember we are talking quicks here. 3 steps UTC, Catch Cock Throw direct snap.

Joe

Somewhere to start?  We would be Air Coryell if we got good at all that.  Hitches, Hoss and Slant Arrow: Everything I need right there! 8)


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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Fade/Out is highly underrated.  It's a nice hi/lo read on the CB.  Fades aren't as hard to complete as a lot of people think... but you have to practice them and let the QB get a feel for how to "fade the receiver to the sideline" and the receiver needs to learn it's up to him to adjust and get to the ball.  With all that said, you'll usually throw the out anyway.

"Stick" is probably one of the more consistent and versatile yardage gainer out there, too.  It's essentially just the Fade/Out combo, but with a flat route by a back layered in there.

I like slants (or Fins--Five and In, w which I feel is easier to coach and complete) as a package of double slants and an arrow to one side and a slant with a bubble to the other side.  You're still throwing off the flat defender, but the double slants are a little better vs. hard Cov. 2.

IMO, the secret to quick game is to make it a simple 1 defender read.  Take a 3 step drop from under center or a 1 step drop while looking at that guy.  Have the ball coming out as soon as your foot hits the ground on the last step.


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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A

Good stuff as usual!

I left Stick out even though it's probably my favorite. Waiting for some one to go into detail.

Here's how we do it:

Stick is a 3 man concept, we do it to a 3 man side or a 2 man side with the back being the third man.

You can specify any receiver running any route, but I will keep it simple.

#1 Runs a Go to take the top off. If we see C2 we will throw the "Hole Shot" where the QB drops it in at 14 yds.

#2 Runs the Stick, he angles to the inside shoulder of the near defender hitching at 5 & will drift away from the nearest defender. that is where the QB will throw the ball.

#3 Runs an Arrow getting width first he must go under the Stick man.

QB identify's the Apex or Flat defender. He throws the ball off his movement. The Stick route is thrown on read. The QB has to throw the receiver open. Defender outside throw to the inside shoulder, Defender inside throw the outside shoulder.

We work the Stick throw with 2 defenders & one receiver, having them switch assignments. The receiver must catch & get vertical as fast as he can. He will spin to where the QB puts the ball.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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Even though we take an extra two steps on the rhythm seam (3 step UTC on fade), we consider 4 verts to be part of our quick game. So by our definition that would be my favorite quick concept. Then stick which really builds off of slant / arrow (same read for QB if fade is capped on stick).

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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Dusty Ol Fart
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Gents.

I really have to ask if these concepts are even employable with a 12 year old?  Honestly doing the math with a 4 yard Pistol depth and a 1 step drop and throw and a 25 yard arm Tops, a 14 yard pass means 10 yards to my thinking.  I go back to my belief that you have to reduce the concepts accordingly.  Am I wrong?

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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Gents.

I really have to ask if these concepts are even employable with a 12 year old?  Honestly doing the math with a 4 yard Pistol depth and a 1 step drop and throw and a 25 yard arm Tops, a 14 yard pass means 10 yards to my thinking.  I go back to my belief that you have to reduce the concepts accordingly.  Am I wrong?

Somewhere my 7th grade math teacher is smiling. The Pythagorean Theorem states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. Algebraically, A2 + B2 = C2

In this case, QB's throwing distance is the hypotenuse (C = 25 yards). On fade, we aim to hit the receiver 17-19 yards downfield (so we'll say B = 22 yards which is 17 + 5 yards depth). Now A = the split from the QB to the WR.

Since we know B = 22 & C = 25, A2 = (25^2) - (22^2). In other words, you'd want the WR no more than appx 12 yards wide of the QB at the time of the throw.

The answer is you adjust your split accordingly. If your WRs use a 9 yard split from the QB (to account for him getting wider in outside release) and QB gets the ball out on time, even your 25 yard noodle arm can hit the fade if the ball is thrown on time.

Don't thank me...thank Mr. Prestininzi!

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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Dusty - the pythagorean example is really to address how you can throw the fade even when the QB doesn't have the strongest arm (and to make my man Mr. P happy).

The other concepts being discussed (Hitch, Slant / Arrow, Hoss) are much shorter throws your QB could def make if he can throw 25 yards.

Key is don't ask your QB to do what he can't do! Work within what he CAN do!

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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Dusty Ol Fart
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Thanks GP (I think).  LOL

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
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Somewhere my 7th grade math teacher is smiling. The Pythagorean Theorem states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. Algebraically, A2 + B2 = C2

In this case, QB's throwing distance is the hypotenuse (C = 25 yards). On fade, we aim to hit the receiver 17-19 yards downfield (so we'll say B = 22 yards which is 17 + 5 yards depth). Now A = the split from the QB to the WR.

Since we know B = 22 & C = 25, A2 = (25^2) - (22^2). In other words, you'd want the WR no more than appx 12 yards wide of the QB at the time of the throw.

The answer is you adjust your split accordingly. If your WRs use a 9 yard split from the QB (to account for him getting wider in outside release) and QB gets the ball out on time, even your 25 yard noodle arm can hit the fade if the ball is thrown on time.

Don't thank me...thank Mr. Prestininzi!

You are finally explaining something I understand!  I was an engineering major ;D


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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S

The biggest misconception about arm strength is throwing the fade. The fade throw is actually fairly easy to teach, the throws that need the most "Zip" on the ball are the Slant & Hitch. If you can teach him to the Slant than everything else is easy. One of my CP's when teaching him to throw the Slant is to throw with authority.

I have done these Quick game concepts with 10's, so at 12 it shouldn't be an issue. I focus on the delivery, & the mechanics involved. Even those noodle arm QB's can throw Stick, & Slant Arrow. GP is on the money about adjusting the size of the splits to match the arm strength. The way to determine what will work for your team is the effective split the QB can throw Hitch at.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Dusty Ol Fart
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Guys I can teach the fade merely suggesting that it has to happen sooner with younger kids.  A lot of folks on here see a fade mentioned and think it has to be 20 plus yards downfield.  OR They believe there has to be "Separation" in order to throw.  Even a noodle arm can throw a receiver open. 

My Wheel routes are designed as a "Fade" but the ball comes out at about 10 yards. 🙂 

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Too piggy back on a few things....

I decided about 5 years ago that worrying about spacing when using mulitple receivers to one side was actually a negative...run or pass. Timing trumps all and different spacing promotes different timing. So now we bunch most everything and can run the gambit from there. I think this accidentally plays into G's Pythagorean Theorem.  :-

I also believe all youth passing should fall under this quick game category outside of play actions.  For me this means using routes the are continuous and never stop. My trust in this is that this philosophy opens up more targets....all designs are one or two routes clearing for a primary per the coverage. When we go Empty is 4 routes clearing for the primary. We also rely on matchups.

For me its all about a quick tempo or as Joe eluded too....3 steps UTC, Catch Cock Throw direct snap.

Marry that up with your concepts and off you go. I cant imagine using anything but quick game stuff at the youth level.... otherwise you are going to get your QB hurt since most youth DC's would rather blitz over teaching high quality coverage skills. Trust that one of your receivers will be open in 2 seconds...or for 2 seconds.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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I think this accidentally plays into G's Pythagorean Theorem.  :-

I'd love to take credit but it's actually Pythagoras' theorem.

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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M

While bunch has it's place, & we do use it down on the Goal Line because of spacing. I think you are missing out when not being concerned with spacing, & the field. The whole concept of being a "Spread Team" is to vertically & horizontally stretch the field. It's the same with the large OLine splits. Studies show 75% of the time the ball will be on one hash or the other. If you aren't accounting for this then you are short changing your offense.

The age & relative arm strength also plays into the equation. All the pieces fit together, the Fast Screen game compliments the Quick game which compliments the Play Action game which into compliments the full drop game. Of course it is important to take into consideration the ability of the team you are coaching. Younger teams the full drop game may only be slow screens.

In dealing with coaches running similar things to what I teach, the biggest fault I often see is they leave one part or another out. Then they don't understand why things don't work. I think too many coaches only worry about what works against bad teams & have no concern for what to do against good teams. "Oh we don't need to run(insert play or series)" we are scoring like crazy. Then they play a good team & can't get them to honor anything. Our team didn't play well! No it was more you didn't coach well.

At the Youth level, perhaps a team will throw a quick concept 4 times a game. That is enough to force a defense to honor them. It doesn't even matter that they are all complete, the threat sometimes is enough. I have always taken great pleasure in forcing a defense to make adjustments. It could be a change in coverage or the front, either way I will make them uncomfortable doing what they don't want to do.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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