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Quick Game Concepts & Teaching

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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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The real issues with the Quick Game for Youth is the delivery & the routes. When I review film most times the QB's never release the ball on time. The receiver's routes are always different.

QB's need to be taught how to throw the ball on time. R4 is great for this. Regardless it is something that has to be practiced. Using a stop watch is part of the  process. We also practice throwing blindfolded(thanks Coach Mountjoy).

In order to get perfect routes in the Youth game we count steps. Having the inside foot back we then count the steps for all the breaks, we also count any stem steps.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Dusty Ol Fart
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"In order to get perfect routes in the Youth game we count steps. Having the inside foot back we then count the steps for all the breaks, we also count any stem steps."

This right here is one of the things that will drive you absolutely nuts!  Even with Counting Steps and all, I cant tell you how many kids cannot repeat the process the same way twice.  Even if they can, the question then becomes can they actually catch the ball? 

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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MHcoach
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S

This about coaching it over & over. Having the stem & steps down. Then having them execute it again & again. The actual catching of the ball comes next.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Spyder89
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The real issues with the Quick Game for Youth is the delivery & the routes. When I review film most times the QB's never release the ball on time. The receiver's routes are always different.

QB's need to be taught how to throw the ball on time. R4 is great for this. Regardless it is something that has to be practiced. Using a stop watch is part of the  process. We also practice throwing blindfolded(thanks Coach Mountjoy).

In order to get perfect routes in the Youth game we count steps. Having the inside foot back we then count the steps for all the breaks, we also count any stem steps.

Joe

Joe,

This may be a dumb question, but I'll ask it anyways. 

Why do you count the steps with the inside foot back?  Does your scheme teach inside foot back in stance, or have I not had enough coffee this morning to understand the reasoning (very probable)? 

- Ray


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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Joe,

This may be a dumb question, but I'll ask it anyways. 

Why do you count the steps with the inside foot back?  Does your scheme teach inside foot back in stance, or have I not had enough coffee this morning to understand the reasoning (very probable)?

Not Joe but inside foot back keeps the steps consistent on both sides which helps timing. Inside breaking routes are always off of an odd number of steps (bc you break off your outside foot), outside off an even number (break off inside foot).

For example, two basic inside breaking routes: Slant - WRs break on the 3rd Step & Post on the 5th. Outside breaking: Arrow off 2nd Step, Corner off 6th step.

Helps create consistent timing.

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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MHcoach
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Spyder

If we start the same way regardless what side we are on the steps will be the same. Now, starting with inside foot or outside foot is always a matter of debate. The important thing is to be consistent.

The other thing we do early in the season to get really perfect at the steps & breaks is, we lay our small flat cones exactly where the steps are.

So, our stance for WR's is inside foot back(toe to instep). We count the stem step as a step. The breaks are on a specific # of steps.

At the HS level we do it with yardage because there can be a large variance in the size of steps. At the Youth level steps tends to be a lot more consistent. It's an easier teach.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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MHcoach
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When I discuss having specific steps for each route, & being precise in running the routes; I have heard coaches say it's over kill. Then they wonder why their Quick Passing game is so bad.

I think they become intimidated by actually having to learn what the steps are. IMHO it  makes coaching easier if you know exactly what you are supposed teach. Obviously the ability to catch the ball is important, but route running is vital also. We work on this everyday, at the Youth level in order to be successful you need to do it at least once a week.

I believe once a coach understands something then they can teach it better. Then it needs to work on grass. Counting steps to the break works on grass. It eliminates any doubt.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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ThunderFootball
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Suggestions on how to teach that consistency to slots using Canadian motion?


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PSLCOACHROB
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Joe,
Does the pre snap read of defender alignment eliminate the teaching of "attacking the technique" to the receiver? A big thing I used to do with receivers when I was coaching them was using yhe stem to attack coverage to get defenders hips turned the wrong way. So if my receiver has a slant against inside leverage do you just check to the next option and don't worry about coaching that receiver to use the stem to change leverage? Does my question  make any sense?


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Dusty Ol Fart
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When I discuss having specific steps for each route, & being precise in running the routes; I have heard coaches say it's over kill. Then they wonder why their Quick Passing game is so bad.

I think they become intimidated by actually having to learn what the steps are. IMHO it  makes coaching easier if you know exactly what you are supposed teach. Obviously the ability to catch the ball is important, but route running is vital also. We work on this everyday, at the Youth level in order to be successful you need to do it at least once a week.

I believe once a coach understands something then they can teach it better. Then it needs to work on grass. Counting steps to the break works on grass. It eliminates any doubt.

Joe

Nails It.     

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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MHcoach
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Rob

It makes a lot of sense, that is why I say we count the stem step too. We stem to the route, inside routes inside stem. Now, running a Slant with a defender with inside leverage; the receiver will break on his third step. First step inside stem second step vertical, third is the break aiming inside shoulder.

Usually the leverage is also about the depth. So if the defender has inside leverage but is above the hard deck it really shouldn't matter. We still should able to hit the Slant under him. If he's under the hard deck the slant is a bad throw next read.

Of course press coverage changes everything. At the Youth level press coverage is rare, save the Goal line. Now it becomes important to use hands and stem wider.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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MHcoach
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Topic starter  

Suggestions on how to teach that consistency to slots using Canadian motion?

Thunder

Great question & to be honest I have no idea.

I would imagine you would have to teach depth instead of steps, but that is only a guess.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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Spyder89
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Not Joe but inside foot back keeps the steps consistent on both sides which helps timing. Inside breaking routes are always off of an odd number of steps (bc you break off your outside foot), outside off an even number (break off inside foot).

For example, two basic inside breaking routes: Slant - WRs break on the 3rd Step & Post on the 5th. Outside breaking: Arrow off 2nd Step, Corner off 6th step.

Helps create consistent timing.

GP,

Thanks.  Kind of what I figured, but we all know what assuming does.

- Ray

Spyder

If we start the same way regardless what side we are on the steps will be the same. Now, starting with inside foot or outside foot is always a matter of debate. The important thing is to be consistent.

The other thing we do early in the season to get really perfect at the steps & breaks is, we lay our small flat cones exactly where the steps are.

So, our stance for WR's is inside foot back(toe to instep). We count the stem step as a step. The breaks are on a specific # of steps.

At the HS level we do it with yardage because there can be a large variance in the size of steps. At the Youth level steps tends to be a lot more consistent. It's an easier teach.

Joe

Joe,

Thanks.  The bold portion is the main reason I was asking the question.  I hate the debate and don't think it honestly matters...because as you said, consistency is the key and makes everything easier in teaching and learning.

I've always taught yardage rather than steps, but have been thinking about switching to steps this season.  Seems to be an easier teach for the younger kids.

- Ray

- Ray


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MHcoach
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Ray

I have taught it both ways. We teach yardage at the HS level. Here it is very easy to see why. We can have a 6'5" receiver & 5'6" receiver. There is a huge disparity in the length of their steps.

It is much easier to  teach steps, & the receivers will get it faster. Teaching depth it really matters if the receiver is on or off. There is a 1 yd difference. So we have to constantly be on top of our guys.

Teaching steps it was easier for my receivers to be more consistent faster.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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When I discuss having specific steps for each route, & being precise in running the routes; I have heard coaches say it's over kill. Then they wonder why their Quick Passing game is so bad.

I think they become intimidated by actually having to learn what the steps are. IMHO it  makes coaching easier if you know exactly what you are supposed teach. Obviously the ability to catch the ball is important, but route running is vital also. We work on this everyday, at the Youth level in order to be successful you need to do it at least once a week.

I believe once a coach understands something then they can teach it better. Then it needs to work on grass. Counting steps to the break works on grass. It eliminates any doubt.

Joe

I believe route running is as important as the protection. Great route runners get open and become easier targets building confident with the young QB. Very important.

We even count off steps for routes the have double monuments....sluggo, popcorn, dig.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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