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4-2-5 Blue/Solo Coverage  

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joshv155
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September 12, 2016 11:59 am  

Playing a HS team that runs a 4-2-5 on defense. After researching about it, because I knew very little, I located the below link. I found that link on this site and this is the coverage they appear to use. I am trying to get more info on the best way to attack what they call Blue & Blue Solo coverage. We run a one back where we run IZ, OZ, Power, counter and several passing concepts.

How would you attack this D passing wise ? They leave 6 in the box at all times. Their ILB's are in 30 or 40 tech's. Hard to be sure with the sideline camera view. I will ask more questions soon just trying to get an idea of how to attack this team. thanks in advance.

http://runcodhit.blogspot.com/2009/12/4-2-5-split-field-coverage.html

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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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September 12, 2016 12:07 pm  

Theres a link?

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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ZACH
 ZACH
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September 12, 2016 12:11 pm  

Nevermind found my info on this

Its pattern matching based on perceived pass strength

Theyll try and run say cover 2 to the pass strength (read side) and man or man combo opposite

Blue solo just tells backside cb in 3x1 hes alone

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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joshv155
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September 12, 2016 12:15 pm  

Theres a link?

Now there is sorry.

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ZACH
 ZACH
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September 12, 2016 12:16 pm  

What are they looking for:

-Pass strength
- not to get duped backside
- cover all pass options

In college we ran a lot of dual call defenses that morfed to the offense.

If youre one back theyll declare your H back the key for pass strength in base 21 personel.

If you use Bills stuff, doubles, trips, trey, indian. The blue or cover 2 zone side will be over the H

If you have 2 high you run the rock and punish them for it. So be prepared to grind this out.

Cover 2 beater that ide start with is the "smash concept"

Man side or man combo ide run "choice" concepts based on safety drops

3x1 garuntees you isoed the backside cb...challenge him...

Pm.me for more

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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joshv155
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September 12, 2016 12:31 pm  

Nevermind found my info on this

Its pattern matching based on perceived pass strength

Theyll try and run say cover 2 to the pass strength (read side) and man or man combo opposite

Blue solo just tells backside cb in 3x1 hes alone

I have not looked into pattern matching at all. I guess I need to look that up. I am assuming they will have this look when facing us:

                                                        FS
                          SS
                                    LB      LB              WS
  C                                                                                C 
                              E    T      T      E
    X                        LT LG C RG RT                          Z
                            H                                    S
                                          Q 
                                 
                                        RB

The SS usually plays a step or two closer than the FS. The WS will be on our slot. Their DE's always go outside and they slant their T's while stunting the LB's a good amount. Corners play outside shade of the X/Z which made me think it was cover 2 funneling to the safeties but that's not what they do for the most part. From what I read and watched corner will take #1 on a vertical route. FS takes #2 (slot) on a vertical route and WS would drop and rob #1 on any breaking route or just keep dropping on a vertical route. They left the flats open a ton for a RB swing. The WS came up and made some plays but also the offense broke a couple. If #2 runs and in/out breaking route WS stay with him and then FS robs #1 or #2 depending on their route break. Makes sense in my brain but does that sound about right ?

Sometimes the WS plays at safety depth, 10-12 deep.

If #1 & #2 cross say post/wheel then Corner takes the outside man WS takes inside. FS helps with inside breaking route ?

On Film they also go to this:

                                            FS
                         
                        SS                                      WS

          C                                                                              C 

            X                  LT LG C RG RT                              Z
                              H                                    S

I thought it was an inverted cover 3 with the corners taking the flats but they ran with any deep routes. Thinking it's basically the same coverage but didn't see enough passes yet to confirm. Still studying.

Passio Bellator


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ZACH
 ZACH
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September 12, 2016 12:48 pm  

This is a complicated coverage however read up on pattern reading zone and make sure its not that

The ss will go to you slot side opposite H, unless they scout well and pass to H more then S

There also comes a time where you can matchup weak side like the article said... if you put you pass strength (s) to the boundary and put H side to the field and keep the H tight and the wr out by the #s they wont be able to pattern match/ read well.

Now you know have man coverage in the field 😉 now if you flood you have a lot of options and potentially open receivers

Pm.me your number

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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CoachMattC
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September 12, 2016 1:48 pm  

Try Naked to H from pistol or gun. Floods the cover 2 and gives the read side bad information without going UC.

Don't see why a well spaced tunnel or rocket screen to 1 wouldn't make hay on the away side. Rocket money might be a home run if #2 is hammering the corner.

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


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Test Account
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September 12, 2016 5:39 pm  

attack the safety with #3

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


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joshv155
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September 24, 2016 6:05 pm  

Forgot to mention we won this game 12-7. We sucked on offense most of the game. That was two weekends ago and we won so we have moved on. But we were not that good that game.

Passio Bellator


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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December 17, 2016 7:39 am  

Playing a HS team that runs a 4-2-5 on defense. After researching about it, because I knew very little, I located the below link. I found that link on this site and this is the coverage they appear to use. I am trying to get more info on the best way to attack what they call Blue & Blue Solo coverage. We run a one back where we run IZ, OZ, Power, counter and several passing concepts.

How would you attack this D passing wise ? They leave 6 in the box at all times. Their ILB's are in 30 or 40 tech's. Hard to be sure with the sideline camera view. I will ask more questions soon just trying to get an idea of how to attack this team. thanks in advance.

http://runcodhit.blogspot.com/2009/12/4-2-5-split-field-coverage.html

"Solo" just means the weak side is manned up against Trips so they can get numbers to the Trips side.  The CB is "solo" against the WR on the backside of trips and that's where you want to attack.  If you see solo coverage, throw routes that pick on the isolated man: slants, fades, quick outs, or roll to it and throw a deep comeback.  You can also have success with speed option and off tackle runs to the weak side, since the S there is going to be cheated to the MOF to cap the deep route by #3 there and they'll have a harder time with run force.  Play action to that isolated receiver can be good, too.

"Blue" is really a fancy match man coverage against 2 receivers.  It's basically Cov. 0 against #1 and #2 on the boundary, but with the CB and S switching if #2 goes out at 8 yards or less.  The way you attack that is stuff like double slants and in-breaking routes.  Post/Curl is a good one here, too, since the S has to honor the curl and your CB can often get behind him with an angle on the CB that way.

When it comes to the ILBs in the box, their coverage responsibility usually just amounts to walling off and carrying the near receiver vertical or taking RB out.  They have pretty simple responsibilities, really.  PAP that runs the outside coverage off and leaks guys out of the backfield into the flats can cause this trouble.

The best way to think of a 4-2-5 is to really think of it as a 4-4, but with the WOLB rolled back like a S and the FS cheated over to the field.  That's really all it is.  Most 4-2-5s will want to play a lot of field/boundary stuff with 3 guys to the field and 2 to the boundary.  It looks fancier and more complex on first glance than it is, especially if you study TCU stuff and see the 1001 calls they have for everything.  For all the supposedly-fancy pattern match coverage, they're basically just playing a few variations of Quarters Coverage that turn into Man at 12 yards or so, anyway, with some Cov. 3/Cov. 1 thrown in, especially in blitzing situations.

Stuff that is annoying to a 4-2-5 are things like Trips to the boundary, which forces them to either adjust to the numbers by sliding the FS over there or leave a single receiver isolated to the field with a ton of room to work against that CB.  You don't want to throw much to the boundary out of trips, but it gets you bodies to run the ball outside and off tackle there.  3 and 4 receiver bunches and stuff along those lines can cause issues, too.

You can also work nasty splits with TEs to pull 6 or 7 techs out wide and make them easy to kick out.


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COACH JC
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December 17, 2016 7:50 am  

We run a 4-2-5 & also have some split combo coverage principles. Our weakest point was always in the flats & flood routs.

WR's can also usually settle in behind the backers & find some space.

Also look into robber coverage. A lot of 4-2-5 teams run it w/ their FS.

It's all about having fun.  But losing aint fun!


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blockandtackle
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December 17, 2016 7:55 am  

We run a 4-2-5 & also have some split combo coverage principles. Our weakest point was always in the flats & flood routs.

WR's can also usually settle in behind the backers & find some space.

Also look into robber coverage. A lot of 4-2-5 teams run it w/ their FS.

The cool thing about Robber is that it's really just Quarters to the strong side and Cov. 3 to the weak side against 2 backs.  Our base Quarters coverage is really just a Double Robber, anyway.

That's the cool thing about split field coverage: you pick about 3-4 things you'll run to the field and 2-3 things you want to run on the boundary, with maybe 2-3 checks you want to run against Trips, and you can combine those to have more than enough defense to handle anything you see.


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COACH JC
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December 17, 2016 9:08 am  

The cool thing about Robber is that it's really just Quarters to the strong side and Cov. 3 to the weak side against 2 backs.  Our base Quarters coverage is really just a Double Robber, anyway.

That's the cool thing about split field coverage: you pick about 3-4 things you'll run to the field and 2-3 things you want to run on the boundary, with maybe 2-3 checks you want to run against Trips, and you can combine those to have more than enough defense to handle anything you see.

No doubt. I'm sure you have much more knowledge on it than me. Because most teams are so run heavy in youth ball, we rarely have to get into a lot of this stuff.  But we try to teach it & install it true to form, just in case.

It's all about having fun.  But losing aint fun!


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blockandtackle
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December 17, 2016 9:21 am  

No doubt. I'm sure you have much more knowledge on it than me. Because most teams are so run heavy in youth ball, we rarely have to get into a lot of this stuff.  But we try to teach it & install it true to form, just in case.

I don't know about that, but thanks  😉

I honestly don't know that Split Field coverage is necessary at the youth level.  We run Cov. 1, and only Cov. 1, with our freshmen until about halfway through the season and just work on man to man fundamentals.  It's kind of like basketball: even if you want to run zone defense in games and only practice it a few minutes a week, it's still best to invest in teaching and repping those man to man fundamentals because that's what they need to know.  If you can get good at man to man, you can stop anything.

By the end of the season, we'll have Cov. 0 (just Cov. 1 without MOF help), Cov. 3 (just Cov. 1 with the OSS switching if something crosses face into the flat), Quarters (Robber on both sides) and 2 Read (Quarters, but with both keying #2 and switching if he goes out within 5 yards) in there to try to prepare them for varsity  but we still sit in Cov. 1 probably 80% of the time in games.


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