Notifications

1st Look at KB for Hephzibah High School  

Page 1 / 5
  RSS

William Harrell
(@coachwwharrell)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 171
Head Football Coach
June 27, 2015 5:34 am  

Went to a local 7-on-7 after practicing the KB for 2 and 1/2 days in 15 minute segments. Knew it wasn't going to be pretty and had a ton of mistakes in terms of alignment and assignment, but we competed and did ok despite tons of errors. Used Nickel and Bear (Cover 1 Press) occasionally and also had a 2nd group rotating in on the 2nd and 3rd game.

Keys points that I know:
Corners not inside enough  >:(
Safeties too far back at times
OLBs not jamming a inside release or dropping into flats
Corners and Safeties not communicating on crosses  ???
Backside Safety not staying home vs Trips (being in position to break on backside Post)
Mike not getting a deep enough Middle Hook drop
Corners too far back, at times.
Eye discipline; not jumping short routes to give up deep ones.  ::)

I know there's more. Offensively we were inconsistent; ran a Spread Single Wing with 2-3 QBs. Have a STUD at WR and 2-3 guys who are fast, but have no weight to them. 1st QB has a gun and decent speed (4.6 40 yd dash), but needs work on mechanics and accuracy. 2nd QB is a tank of a RB who can only run straight ahead. He is short, but has a decent arm. Is a wasted player trying to run routes (we found that out in the film). I attached the film using Hudl to MP4; if anyone knows a better or cleaner way, let me know.

Comments, PMs, and likes (or non-likes  :'( ) are welcome.

Hephzibah...PRIDE!!!


Quote
CoachMattC
(@coachmattc)
Gold
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2352
DC
June 27, 2015 7:00 am  

Thanks for posting coach. Here are the things I saw.

Definitely need to get those corners closer and with inside leverage. Make them complete the long out routes.

Safeties are not splitting the distance between the OT and #2. The first play is slant/arrow which should be taken away just by alignment. Safety is the QB's read. Also look at the back on this play. The OLB has no idea that kid released and the corner is in no position to break on #2 even if the OLB did come up and take the back. The OLB needs to beat the crap out of #2 (give the corner time to react) then come out on the back. This play is a great learning opportunity to show them on film why they need to have their alignment just right. They can stop plays standing still if they just get aligned.

One the second play the corner is so far back he's out of the frame. One of the reasons this coverage is effective is because we are playing with what Slack guys call the hard deck. The hard deck is generally a line that extends across the field from the depth of the Umpire. All the pre-snap reads are based on whether a guy is behind or in front of the hard deck. Why does this matter? The corner isn't the guy who got beat? It matters because when the corner plays that deep, you are telegraphing your coverage. Any QB who's been coach at all now knows you are in Cover 2 Invert. And that means the corner has deep half. So we're going to pick on the safety to put him in conflict. Also, look at the back on the opposite side. OLB has no idea that kid released because he turned and ran with #2.

Second series second to last play they made you pay for not watching that back. It's slant/arrow/seam which is a nice little adjustment by them. All I can say it is took over 4 seconds to get that pass off. If you left a QB sit there and read that long in the real world you need to find new DE's. On the extra point it looks like you went press man for goalline. If you get a guy on an island like they created right there I would prefer to play him 5x2. Force them to complete snag, don't give up an easy slant.

Will try to watch more later.

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


ReplyQuote
DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8620
June 29, 2015 10:02 am  

Just saw this post today.

Every single play, I was staring at the corners who never lined up right once.  The receiver would just run across the face of the corner on some sort of slant and be WIDE OPEN.  And it just went ON and ON and ON  and I'm like, "Who is coaching the corners?"  ???

It's hard to notice what else is happening when a wide receiver is wide open EVERY DOWN running the same route 100 times in a row.  I watched and watched and watched waiting for them to get fixed and it never happened.  😮

Start out lining them up right.  Instead of 7x4 they looked 14-0.  That doesn't mean 7x4 is the magic number.  It probably isn't.  You may end up in 8x3 or 10x2 but not 14-0.    Start in 7x4 and then move them, one step at a time, in the direction they got beat.  They might as well start learning it now because they can do it in a game.

The reason you start in 7x4, even if it doesn't work, is because he can make his read.  From 14-0, he can't make his read.  From 14-0 you're forcing them to read #1 and not #2.  Once he can make his read, now you adjust him in the direction he got beat.  Since you have the ability to practice, you can let a corner get beat THREE TIMES on the same play before you move him one step.  That's because the reason he got beat may not be where he was standing but where his eyes were.  Because these corners were placed in impossible coverage they have undoubtedly stopped reading #2 since wide open #1 is toasting their butt.  So I would make them point at #2 in their three step drop (from 7x4).     

Last, police their three step drop - Not that they're doing it wrong but it's another tool for fixing a corner.  You can shorten his steps if he's getting beat underneath, or lengthen them if he's getting beat deep.  But the starting point is they should be done with their three step drop just as the average receiver makes his break.  Time it up.  Now adjust his step towards his coverage weakness.

Next time I watch, I'll focus on their three step drop.  I didn't.  It may be right.  I don't know.

Thanks for posting because everyone else gets a chance not only to learn from your mistakes but see the result of offered solutions.

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


ReplyQuote
DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8620
June 29, 2015 12:32 pm  

OK.  Let's go through the very first play.  The offense is in Spread Twins formation.  I have numbered the receivers below to their side:

              C1                                                                    C2

                                                              S2
                                              S1
                                                    M
                              B1                                    B2
               
              1                                    O                                  1
                              2                                      2
                                                  QB
                                              RB 

Right off, only two defenders lined up right.  They are S2 and M.  Everybody else is wrong.  S1 lined up on RB.  He can look at RB but he can't line up on him.  He should be 4 yards inside #2 slot on the left.  He's closer to 7.  This will allow #2 to come open.  He's also about 4 yards deep (one yard behind Mike) instead of 6.  This will again, help the slot get open.

B1 and B2 are also lined up wrong.  They are 2 yards off the LOS.  There is probably 4 yards between them and #2.  This allows #2 to release straight at B1/B2 for 3 steps, leaving B1 and B2 not knowing which way he's going to release to.  So they have to stand, wait, and do nothing until #2 makes his move. Meanwhile #2 is picking up speed due to the increased distance between them.  It is guaranteed that their #2 can beat our B1/B2 on pass.  Backing up B1 and B2 off the LOS will not change that except to make it worse

You want them up closer and for four reasons.

1) B1 and B2 actually have RB for screen.  Moving them back 2 yards moves them 2 yards further from the screen.
2) #2 is forced to choose a side first step and w/o picking up speed. 
3) B1 and B2 are supposed to chuck an inside release.  Just try and chuck a receiver 4 yards away from you running an inside slant without moving 4 yards inside yourself to do it.  We don't want that.  If B1/B2 are having to run 4 yards inside to chuck #2 and RB is running 4 yards outside for screen, what's happening to our screen coverage?
4) Your corner is looking at #2 for his read and, as long as the #2 can just go straight at B1/B2 without committing to a side, the corner is not getting a read.  The corner has his three steps back to get his read.  That's it.  B1/B2 are allowing #2 to take three steps forward and give no read. What a waste!  Watch this first play and you'll see the corners' heads are turned in to read #2 as instructed.  Fast forward and check again.  The corners are no longer watching #2.  The OLB's made their read worthless.

B1 and B2 are not tilted at RB/QB.  They are both facing #2.  They LOOK at #2 but they don't FACE #2.  They are tilted instead at the backfield.

WHY?

From tilt it is easy to step forward and chuck #2 if he inside releases and you want a GOOD HARD CHUCK!   Smack him one full step inside.  Get him off his track!

From tilt it is also easy to back up and outside with an outside release by #2.  If you're B1 and facing #2, you cannot back up outside with him.  The reason you back up to the outside is two fold:

1) You look into the backfield for RB to release for screen or QB to run option 
2) If RB doesn't come towards B1/B2, look at where the QB is looking and run there.  You don't need to know where #2 is. Just run where QB is looking.  The OLB is not in coverage on #2.  He is in screen coverage on RB.  But, when he backs up and outside, he gets in the way of the QB from just throwing straight to #2.  The QB has to wait for #2 to get away from B1/B2 and now the QB is looking at #2 so now B1/B2 breaks out of backpedal and runs to where QB is looking to maintain coverage to 5 yards.  While the QB is waiting for #2 to get open, here comes the corner to take over the coverage on #2.

Remember!  The OLB's move like bishops in chess.  Either forward at an angle or backwards at an angle.

Next up, the corners are too deep.  How do you know when you corners are too deep?  Simple.  QB throws straight to #1.  If #1 catches the pass on the LOS and gains more than 3 yards before corner tackles him, corner is back too far.    Run this play right off.  Get your corners right early.

The corners must be inside #1.  Otherwise, you give up the easy slants and they never have to throw the hard stuff. 

OK!  Now this post was limited to the mistakes made before the snap.  Next post I'll cover the actual snap of the first play.. 

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


ReplyQuote
Bruceja
(@bruceja)
Silver
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 744
June 29, 2015 6:00 pm  

What a terrific post! I need more of this. Real kids making real mistakes that I am sure I am going to have to correct. I am about to call my assistants and wake them up and talk shop!!Fired up!


ReplyQuote
DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8620
June 30, 2015 12:56 am  

What a terrific post! I need more of this. Real kids making real mistakes that I am sure I am going to have to correct. I am about to call my assistants and wake them up and talk shop!!Fired up!

It is good.  I'm glad Harrell posted it and put up the film.  Should be a learner to all.  🙂

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


ReplyQuote
DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8620
June 30, 2015 2:40 pm  

OK!  Let's go through the very first play.  This was the formation:

            C1                                                                      C2

                                                              S2
                      -->                  S1
                    /                              M
                  / <____B1                                    B2
                /            |
              1                |                    O                                  1
                              2                                      2
                                                  QB
                                              RB 

Remember that all but two of the defenders lined up wrong.  The first play had the slot and SE's cross on both sides of the formation.  The QB called the snap at the 5 second mark, with the ball hitting his hands at the 6 second mark.  First:

Who killed the bee?

Right off, Mike didn't.  S1 and S2 didn't kill the bee either and went right into backpedal. 

S1's head turns right so C1 probably called "Out!" and he heard it.  That was good.
The RB ran a flare left which meant B1 had him.  You can see B1 looking at RB and that was good.  But had he been backing up and outside, he could have seen where the QB was looking and the QB is not looking at RB.  He's looking at receiver #1 "all the way".  The QB throws at the 7 second mark.  Had B1 been backing up to the outside he'd have seen where QB was looking and could have broken on the ball the moment the QB throws.

By way of comparison, in this same 7 second frame, look at B2 on the other side of the field.  He's the guy turned around and running away from the QB. Now that's a mistake but look where he's running to.  Now imagine him turned around at this spot, stopped, and facing the QB.  Could the QB have thrown at the 7 second mark to anyone on his side of the field without him getting the INT?

Your goal, as a Killer Bee coach, is to have your B1 and B2 standing in front of where both receivers cross at the 2 second mark. 

The repping points here for the OLB are the ANGLE he backs up at, the SPEED he backs up (fast), and LOOK at the QB/RB and be ready to BREAK where's throwing. You can probably practice your OLB's in 5 yard backwards races facing a coach with a football playing QB.  At the end of 5 yards, the coach pumps a pass left or right and they both break that way.

What happens if the QB pump fakes this pass but doesn't actually throw?

Nothing.  The only receiver not covered is the RB.  Mike can get over on him.  S1 is also there.

Our OLB's are only in coverage at that 7 second mark anyway.  At the 8 second mark they "might be" in coverage (see B2).  If the QB pump fakes at the 7 second mark, he's simply throwing into our 8-9 second coverage which was going to happen anyway whether he pump fakes or not. 

Once you get your coverage right at the 7 second mark of this first play, here's why you're doing it.  Suppose Mike blitzed "B" gap from 3 yards back (He would blitz opposite side of RB or the left "B" gap.).  He's got about 8 yards to go to reach that QB (7 by a straight line).  At the youth level, I can tell you what's going to happen.  That QB will either be flat on his back or throwing fast into B1/B2.  What happens for HS coach William Harrell?  Easy enough for him to find out.  Put a cone at left "B" gap and make Mike blitz through that cone and play "touch" with the QB.  William will have his answer.  It will also tell him exactly where to back up B1 and B2 to make the INT.

Now I hate to use the term "yards" in football.  What is "one yard" to a HS football player is "two yards" to a 7 year old.  The term "yards" is not interchangeable for all ages.  Now I can easily play my youth OLB's right on the LOS (and previously explained why you want to).  But, if William can't get his HS OLB's backed up in time for the INT on Mike's blitz, even with proper back up angle and reps on backing up fast, then you have to do exactly what the defense is designed to do.  Move the defender's initial alignment closer to the INT point.  Just move them as little as possible.  The simplest adjustment for an OLB not getting wide enough fast enough, is to have him align, instead of directly in front of #2, line up on the outside shoulder of #2.  Oldest solution in football.  Or, if he's not getting deep enough, align him at the same depth as the DE.  Again, oldest solution in football.  Either solution will move him an arm's length closer to the completion point.  That's a lot.  The key is that he backs up right where those two receivers cross.  You can put a "frisbee" on the field exactly where they cross, never tell the receivers why it's there, and start getting your OLB backing up to that cone FAST!     

We have to put them in that spot in 2 seconds.  That's it!  End of coaching!  When that ball leaves the QB's hand in 2 seconds or less and comes their way, they'll figure out what to do.  And if they INT, there's a TD right in front of them.  Nothing but green!

Okay!  Next!  In Zone, the receiver runs from coverage to coverage.  That means, at the 8 second mark, SE #1 and Slot #2 should be entering the next defender's coverage, who will take them Man to Man.

So advance your film to the 8 second mark of the first play:

Are you there?  Okay!  Look!

Both of the left hand side field receivers are OPEN.  S1 is about to hammer #1 but only after he caught the ball.  And look at C1. He must be 10 yards off his man (slot #2).  If anyone thinks C1 is going to make the tackle on SE #1 if S1 misses, I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you.  C1 only has one job - Cover the outside receiver (#2).  He's not even close. 

The solution?

Again, the oldest solution in football:  Move S1 closer to the receiving point (further to his right) and move C1 closer to #2's receiving point or UP.  Now these two boys are way out of position.  We're not solving this with an "arm's length" solution (unless C1 has 30 foot arms).  I pointed out this error before the ball was even snapped in my first post.  People were lined up wrong.

Notice again, although the offense ran the same receiver routes on the far, right hand side of the field, nothing is nearly so open.

Another problem on the play is that S1 (and S2) were three step dropping instead of killing the bee.  If S1 had killed the bee instead, he'd have arrived two steps earlier.  Keeping that in mind, how far was S1 out of position?

Killer Bee makes your math real easy.  Just count the number of steps the receiver made after the catch before S1 reached him. 

How many?

SE #1 made three steps after the catch before being touched by S1.  So, if you moved S1 three steps further to his right, they'd of both been there at the same time where the catch was made.  And S1 was playing about 7 yards inside Slot #2.  Three steps closer to Slot #2 would put him at 4 yards which is exactly what the manual says.

Remember!  We also cut S1's unnecessary drop steps from three to basically one (kill the bee).  So S1 will now arrive two steps before SE #1 for the INT.  It's no longer just a tie.  Advantage ours.

What happens if S1 misses the INT and SE #1 manages to somehow catch it?

Well!  That's actually pretty rare but then it's up to Mike or S2 to make the tackle.  Look where they are. 

OKAY!  Who wants to try their hand at the next play?  🙂

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


ReplyQuote
William Harrell
(@coachwwharrell)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 171
Head Football Coach
June 30, 2015 5:28 pm  

Appreciate the input guys.

Going to re-evaluate our Personnel and work on Alignment and Technique for the next 3 weeks; really short on coaches so have to coach everyone up. Have to find out if we have the Safeties necessary to run this Defense; they are used to playing a conventional 4-3 so it is going to be an adjustment for them.

Hephzibah...PRIDE!!!


ReplyQuote
DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8620
July 1, 2015 11:29 am  

OKAY!  Second play!  Go to the 13 second mark.  Much tighter cover by OLB's this time but still no tilt.  You can see the reason for the tilt if you watch B2 at the top of the screen. #2 slot outside releases and B2 runs with him.  This is incorrect.  While he is running with Slot #2, watch the RB with the QB run a flare right.  No one takes him!  Who has him?  B2!  B2 is almost in the End zone. 

Again, OLB's go into reverse backpedal no more than 5 yards deep while looking for screen.  By backing up they can see the RB running that screen.  B2 needed to stop backpedaling and come forward for that back.  Getting coverage on the back is a MUST.  This is how screens are thrown:  Run #1 and #2 deep and swing the back out behind them.  And the OLB has to come up FAST.  Instead of being 30 yards downfield, B2 should have been across the LOS and been headed the other way, gunning for RB.  If the ball was thrown to RB, B2 should have been no more than 5 yards from RB when the ball hits the RB's hands.  While RB catches the B2 is now shortening the distance to 4 yards.  That's a doable tackle.  But, if B2 were 10 yards away from RB when he caught that screen, RB is not only going to make twice as many yards but has the space and the time to duck and dodge B2 for another 10 yards.

B2 running downfield with the slot with his back turned covering Slot #2 is also confusing to S2.  He's supposed to take him.  Only B2 has him.  S2 would see the open Slot and take him if B2 wasn't doing his job for him.  As a result, S2 doesn't cover anyone.

Corners:  Both are too deep.  C1 is so deep he can barely be seen and looks like he's part of second level kickoff return.  C2 did not cover SE #1 but covered Slot #2 along with B2!  Two guys on the wrong guy!  Watch SE #1 come open.  As to C1, his man comes wide open on the out and C1 once again thinks he's going to cover S2's man.  Did he do it?  C1 needs to forget covering S2's man instead of his own. 

S2 is now playing too deep and by about a yard.  You might be wondering how he's playing too deep if he got beat deep?  The answer?  Count his steps.  He was 1.5 steps behind his man when beat.  Had he been one step closer to the LOS, he'd have been 2.5 steps behind.  Isn't that worse?  Not if he had been playing 3 steps wider, it's not.  3 steps wider and, instead of 2.5 steps behind, he's .5 steps ahead.

Mike is playing too far back (He's not at 3 yards - more like 4.).  In these skeleton drills he's not going to be much of a factor.  He won't get back in time to INT.  What he's doing is keeping the QB from running, taking away shallow drags, blitzing, and covering RB on a fly.  Since the offense isn't running any of those plays someone's going to get the idea to move him back to 4 yards.  That's a waste.  The defense is designed for Mike at 3 yards or 10 (prevent nickle).  4 yards is spitting in the wind.  I would say Mike is getting no useful reps at all and probably developing bad habits (He's not reading the center as there is no center.).  I'd either give him a center to key, play some "blitz" tag with the QB, or give him a chance to play some nickle.

OK!  Third play!  20 second mark: Let's hear from William Harrell on what he thinks went wrong.  We have a mistake going on that trips formation.  8)

 

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


ReplyQuote
joshv155
(@joshv155)
Platinum
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 3365
July 1, 2015 1:29 pm  

I had this really smart response for play #3 when I realized that the KB team was no on offense.  :'(

Passio Bellator


ReplyQuote
DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8620
July 1, 2015 1:52 pm  

Appreciate the input guys.

Going to re-evaluate our Personnel and work on Alignment and Technique for the next 3 weeks; really short on coaches so have to coach everyone up. Have to find out if we have the Safeties necessary to run this Defense; they are used to playing a conventional 4-3 so it is going to be an adjustment for them.

I saw no talent problems with the safeties.  Corners are not giving us a chance to see what they can do.

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


ReplyQuote
William Harrell
(@coachwwharrell)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 171
Head Football Coach
July 2, 2015 2:59 am  

Coach, got two issues with this defense:

1). Are we really playing Zone? If so, is it Cover 4? Cover 2 Invert? Loose Man? I am getting different answers to this question on this Forum alone. I know it is based on the Formation; I am addressing Spread 10 Personnel Formations. I have to be able to show my assistants exactly what coverage we are running. Right now, it doesn't seem exact.

2.) With Trips and Quads, we are leaving the backside CB on an island with a WR every play. Now I'm fine with that alignment, but no for every play and vs a tall receiver who can play Jumpball with us early and often (this is a easy route for teams in our area to complete). Would you use different looks or just rely on the same adjustment every time?

I know the issues I had in the film; I summarized that in my 1st post. Just put film up since I saw no one at the HS level had put any up. Wasn't looked to get schooled or anything; was going to try to show progress throughout the season. I don't have all of the answers, but not going to go back and forth on the forum with X's and O's without film of the other HS's that have actually ran it successfully.

Hephzibah...PRIDE!!!


ReplyQuote
Bruceja
(@bruceja)
Silver
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 744
July 2, 2015 4:49 am  

Just want u to know coach this is a very good learning tool for us. A lot of us are running the KB for the first time and need to know what things to look for when troubleshooting.


ReplyQuote
Coach Jim
(@jsmcdonaldllc)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 163
July 2, 2015 6:41 am  

Coach Harrell,

Just want u to know coach this is a very good learning tool for us. A lot of us are running the KB for the first time and need to know what things to look for when troubleshooting.

  I echo this sentiment. I appreciate the willingness of coaches such as yourself to share video. It takes courage and there will be a lot of different opinions on what to do or how to fix things. As a youth coach it helps me hear how you solve those issues at your level. I will be posting our video as well this year as it will be our first running the KB full time and understand from previous posts that the key is understanding what is wrong before it can be fixed. I would greatly appreciate seeing the progression of your team in running this D. Also the steps you took in practice to fix the issues you see on film. Again, thank you for posting this video.

Coach Jim


ReplyQuote
DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8620
July 2, 2015 3:15 pm  

Coach, got two issues with this defense:

1). Are we really playing Zone?

Not really.

The two OLB's are in true zone (three under).  For the OLB's, that zone extends from the DE's to the sideline, to 5 yards behind them, to 5 yards in front of them.  They can cover a receiver in their Zone until a back enters it after the snap.  They then take that back in Man and have him to the End Zone.

Mike's Zone is from DE to DE but assigning a depth to his zone is pretty useless.  At 3 yards deep he can't cover much as you noted (Unless you call "Prevent/Nickle" and deliberately line him up deep (And this call is used a lot.).  What he's looking for is a receiving back that passes between the DE's and then covers him all the way to the end zone (Fly).  BUT Mike can also cover a Drag" route in Man.  You can cover both situations with the same rule.  Mike covers anybody that comes within 3 yards of him (I guess you can call that his "zone".).  He can also help a safety if a safety calls "In!" (but the odds are that an "In" receiver came within 3 yards of him anyway).  If he reads pass (center does not come out) he turns his head first to the side of most receivers (That's were the "Drag" or "In" is coming from.).

If so, is it Cover 4? Cover 2 Invert?

By ALIGNMENT it's Inverted Cover 2.

By Coverage it's "Zone Under, Man Deep"

You may want to add a Cover 4 call.  I haven't seen the use for it but another HS coach did.

Loose Man?

A corner in single coverage ("He alone.  Me alone.") is in Man coverage all the way.  You can pick that coverage (loose or press) but I found 5x2 was best in the manual.

I am getting different answers to this question on this Forum alone. I know it is based on the Formation; I am addressing Spread 10 Personnel Formations. I have to be able to show my assistants exactly what coverage we are running. Right now, it doesn't seem exact.

Coming from 4-3 it would not be exact at all.  I came at it from the exact opposite view, coaching 5-4 Cover 2 in the early 90's to switching to Bump and Run in 1997-2010 with 12's and now having to go back to Zone due to Spread.

I wanted Man because it's the simpler teach, all Zone eventually becomes Man anyway, and a Zone corner against a single receiver is in Man coverage.  So, since you have to teach Man anyway, I went with "Man Deep".  By running "Zone Under" spread receivers run from "coverage to coverage" even though it's Man and, the "Zone Under" covers the "bunch" (The point where two receivers cross).

Coverage to Coverage: The OLB will chuck #2 on an inside release.  It creates momentary coverage on #2 because the ball, if thrown at this point, reaches #2 so fast that any disruption of #2's route at all creates coverage.  The OLB will back up outside on outside release, creating momentary coverage until a DB arrives.  Thus, even though the coverage is "Man Deep", #2 runs from coverage to coverage.  At my level of play, #2 slot is the most dangerous receiver and is why I make him run from coverage to coverage. 

Covering the "Bunch": Backing up the OLB into the point where two receivers cross creates the INT possibility against a hurried or "area" throw  (Most spreads use consistent splits creating consistent crossing points not just play to play but game to game.).  Once the "bunch" separates they reach the "Man" level but the offense cannot run a "pick" pass because the level 2 DB's go "Man" after the cross. 

So I was eliminating the problems of Man coverage while still keeping Man coverage.  For the offense, it looks like the defense is in Zone.  After all, if the receivers cross, the DB's take the receiver entering their Zone.  It's why you asked, "Is this Zone?" 

In reality, the DB's are picking up "nearest man" to them in Man and running with them.  They just didn't pick who they had by how they lined up before the snap.  They picked who they had after the snap by who was closest to them.

This is why there is no defined Zone areas for the level two DB's.  There's no need to define it because they're not in it.

   

2.) With Trips and Quads, we are leaving the backside CB on an island with a WR every play. Now I'm fine with that alignment, but no for every play and vs a tall receiver who can play Jumpball with us early and often (this is a easy route for teams in our area to complete). Would you use different looks or just rely on the same adjustment every time?

I've never had to deal with the problem of short covering tall.  Oh!  I had short covering tall.  But tall must bring the ball down after the catch and I taught short how to force tall into a one handed catch.  Or, if tall went up in the air to get the ball, short made tall land on his head.  Ouch!

I have often asked other coaches how they cover tall with short and never gotten a satisfactory answer.

I know the issues I had in the film; I summarized that in my 1st post. Just put film up since I saw no one at the HS level had put any up. Wasn't looked to get schooled or anything; was going to try to show progress throughout the season. I don't have all of the answers, but not going to go back and forth on the forum with X's and O's without film of the other HS's that have actually ran it successfully.

We're all grateful you posted.  It was an interesting drill.  Glad to hear you don't need to be "schooled" but there are others here who do.  If it's all right with you, I will continue to point out the problems and solutions I saw.   

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 5
Share: