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Killer bee for younger teams 7u  


Millz
(@coachmillz)
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Joined: 6 years ago
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I ordered the Killer Bee because I heard how dominant it is. I saw a post Clark put out there of another coach who  pmed him  that installed the KB with 5,6 and 7 year olds and was dominant. I looked at the manual and it looks pretty extensive. Is there any advice or is there a version or way to run this defense for my age group without confusinf them? Normally there is a special section for younger teams my age group. If there is I don't see it. Maybe some of you Coaches with experience with my age group can shed some light on to how you ran it. I'm the HC and I'm going to install it myself.. Thanks,


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angalton
(@angalton)
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You probably don't need to worry about passing to much. What you do need to do is teach tackling and pursuit angles very heavily. I am sure you can change depths of your corners also.

The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.


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CoachBrian
(@coachbrian)
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Coach, you only need to train the kids on what they'll see.  At 7U you are probably not going to see much passing.  You also only need to teach the cues for each position for the offenses you expect to see.  If no one in your league runs spread, don't worry about teaching your team to defend it, etc.

The amount of info each position needs to remember is not bad at all and the kids can grasp it.  The coaches are the one's that have a lot to learn and remember, because they are learning for all positions.


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Coach Smith
(@mpd5123)
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I recommend you read the manual through print out the specific position responsibilities and learn them front to back.  Look at any offense you think you will face and apply the rules.  Any questions look at the defending certain defense section, look on the dumcoach site and if you can't understand something post your issues. 

check out http://www.coaches-clinic.com/If any thing goes bad, I did it. If anything goes semi-good, we did it. If anything goes really good, then you did it. That's all it takes to get people to win football games for you. ~Paul Bear Bryant


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Millz
(@coachmillz)
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I really want to talk to this guy (canepb) he ran the KB with my age group and destroyed teams. I want to find out how he made it work for him and his players. I know from experience that this at this age it's like trying to teach goldfish. I PMed him but haven't gotten a response yet.


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DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
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I really want to talk to this guy (canepb) he ran the KB with my age group and destroyed teams. I want to find out how he made it work for him and his players. I know from experience that this at this age it's like trying to teach goldfish. I PMed him but haven't gotten a response yet.

You can teach the goldfish:

DT's:  Four point stance and "frog hop" them between the guard and center.  If QB is under center, reach for his ankles.  You frog hop off both legs for double power against the center and guard stepping off on one leg to create a stalemate.  Wedge is gone, QB sneak is gone, Trap is going to be tough, and they just lost three blockers.

DE:  Look at the OT.  Is the OT looking at you?  If so, he's going to hit you.  Go around the inside of him (That's why you're flexed.).  If the OT is not looking at you, hit him outside arm free and look in the backfield for the ball.

OLB: Three steps outside DE with outside foot back.  Ricochet on runs to you.  Follow at depth of the ball on plays away.

Corner: 7 steps (not yards) deep and four steps inside their receiver (The four steps inside is very important.).  Outside foot back.  Three short steps back on snap.  On the third step go to the ball.  Do not stop.  Do not slow down.  Do not run in circles.  Go to the ball.  Do not chase runs to the other side of the field  (Watch and save your breath.).

Safety:  Stomp and go.

Mike: Big stomp and go.  Meet runner at the LOS but do not cross the LOS.

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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Millz
(@coachmillz)
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Topic starter  

You can teach the goldfish:

DT's:  Four point stance and "frog hop" them between the guard and center.  If QB is under center, reach for his ankles.  You frog hop off both legs for double power against the center and guard stepping off on one leg to create a stalemate.  Wedge is gone, QB sneak is gone, Trap is going to be tough, and they just lost three blockers.

DE:  Look at the OT.  Is the OT looking at you?  If so, he's going to hit you.  Go around the inside of him (That's why you're flexed.).  If the OT is not looking at you, hit him outside arm free and look in the backfield for the ball.

OLB: Three steps outside DE with outside foot back.  Ricochet on runs to you.  Follow at depth of the ball on plays away.

Corner: 7 steps (not yards) deep and four steps inside their receiver (The four steps inside is very important.).  Outside foot back.  Three short steps back on snap.  On the third step go to the ball.  Do not stop.  Do not slow down.  Do not run in circles.  Go to the ball.  Do not chase runs to the other side of the field  (Watch and save your breath.).

Safety:  Stomp and go.

Mike: Big stomp and go.  Meet runner at the LOS but do not cross the LOS.

That's some good stuff right there.  ;D


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Millz
(@coachmillz)
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Corner: 7 steps (not yards) deep and four steps inside their receiver (The four steps inside is very important.).  Outside foot back.  Three short steps back on snap.

Coach what if there's no receiver to step inside of? Like double tight or some wild cat single wing formation? I will say this most teams in my league are going to run like a shotgun direct snap or want the coach sees on Saturdays and Sundays on TV.
At least that's what I've seen.
I will PM you some game film of some teams a may see this season.


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Coach TonyM
(@ramoody)
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The corner's presnap alignment is based on #1 receiver to his side..  if #1 is a WB or TE, then he is in cloud coverage...stacked behind OLB who is in a 3 pt stance.  From this position the corner does his three step drop and watches wing and tight going out for pass before he comes up to help with run.

From this cloud coverage, corner and olb can Wrong Arm  or Switch.. 


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Coach what if there's no receiver to step inside of? Like double tight or some wild cat single wing formation? I will say this most teams in my league are going to run like a shotgun direct snap or want the coach sees on Saturdays and Sundays on TV.
At least that's what I've seen.
I will PM you some game film of some teams a may see this season.

5 steps back and 2 steps outside of a TE. Treat a WB like a TE.

Keep reading that manual. I had to read it several times before it made sense. Like some other guys said, not too much to worry about now. KB defends the field, so alignment is extremely important. Seeing multiple formations is what will make your head spin. 7 year old offenses can be more complex than you might think, but not if there are 5 year olds out there with them. If you see a WR, he's probably just out there getting his plays, although they might throw a bubble to him. If they do, and he catches it. Fine. Make them do it again before you worry about it.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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