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Who is definitely running the Bee this year?  

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rsmdavis
(@rsmdavis)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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I will be running it for the first time with 9 year old kids. It really looks like it will fit well with the players that are returning from last year.


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polaropp
(@polaropp)
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Joined: 8 years ago
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I will be running it for the 3rd year as defending champs. We will look at the Steel Talon this week.


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joshv155
(@joshv155)
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I will be running it for the 3rd year as defending champs. We will look at the Steel Talon this week.

You have any practice plans, eval drills etc you would care to share ? 1st year running it this season.

Passio Bellator


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Dimson
(@dimson)
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Joined: 8 years ago
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You have any practice plans, eval drills etc you would care to share ? 1st year running it this season.

This!


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Prodigy
(@prodigy)
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Joined: 9 years ago
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This will be our third year running KB and hopefully it will be our best year yet.  We've made many mistakes in teaching tackling and holding kids accountable for what their jobs are in the defense...hoping to remedy it.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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shawnm
(@shawnm)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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I'll be running for 1st time converting from Jack's 63.  Just bought it so studying like a mad man as practice begins August 17th. 

I'm freaking excited about it!!


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Coreyv
(@coreyv)
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Joined: 8 years ago
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Running it with 5-6th graders, after 8th graders last year.

CV


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cougarfootball
(@cougarfootball)
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Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 88
 

I have a couple of questions about this killer bee we plan to implement.  I may also know the answers...let's see!

1.  The DE reads the OT outside foot, and if the OT’s outside foot comes out at him, he goes inside the OT, but does not cross the LOS.    If he goes behind/inside him, does he not get himself boxed out from tackling the back running off tackle, or is he supposed to get inside/behind the OT quick enough to make the tackle?  I am thinking that is what he is doing.

2.  If the offense were running a wishbone and the fullback and the halfback nearest ran his way, who would he take?  I am guessing the fullback, if the fullback was the first one to come at him?  We don’t see that much around here anymore, but that’s what we ran when I was 9!

3.  If the offense was running spread and sent a back in motion toward the OLB (who was in rush mode) , I guess the back in motion becomes the back that the OLB goes after either to hit and ricochet, cover in a 5 yard zone for potential screen, or obviously tackle if he got the ball.  correct?


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Monster
(@monster)
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Joined: 9 years ago
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There are a lot of other Coaches on here who are probably going to give you a better answer than I am, but I learn by explaining so I'm going to give it a shot.

I have a couple of questions about this killer bee we plan to implement.  I may also know the answers...let's see!

1.  The DE reads the OT outside foot, and if the OT’s outside foot comes out at him, he goes inside the OT, but does not cross the LOS.    If he goes behind/inside him, does he not get himself boxed out from tackling the back running off tackle, or is he supposed to get inside/behind the OT quick enough to make the tackle?  I am thinking that is what he is doing.

To me, the key to the DE can be summed up in two phrases, one for the Player and one for the Coach.

Statement to the Player: "Read the Tackle's near foot and race it to where it's going." Now, "that Tackle" is the #2 blocker on his side which is usually an OT, but may not be but that's okay. You want your DE to read the near foot and then race it to where it's going. Once he does that, then he needs needs needs to maintain contact for three steps.

Statement to the Coach: "This is a player you are trying to hide in plain sight." When the DE makes his read and impacts his man, you are really just keeping him busy for the Offense's first three steps of their play. After that point, most every play in every offense ever is past the point of any misdirection movement. After those three steps, get him off his chain and let him make a play but he has to take those three steps! He has to protect the Mike and Safeties behind him for those steps and then he can do pretty much whatever he wants.

2.  If the offense were running a wishbone and the fullback and the halfback nearest ran his way, who would he take?  I am guessing the fullback, if the fullback was the first one to come at him?  We don’t see that much around here anymore, but that’s what we ran when I was 9!

I'm assuming that you mean the DE when you wrote "he" above. Go back to the "three steps" statement. By the time that recessed DE makes his read and finishes his third step, where do you think those 'Backs are going to be? Most likely past him as those 'Backs won't register him as a threat since it looks like he's being blocked. Now after that third step, where do you think the guy getting the ball is? He's probably within striking distance of the DE. Don't make a player read too many things, give him his one read and then tell him to go play football.

3.  If the offense was running spread and sent a back in motion toward the OLB (who was in rush mode) , I guess the back in motion becomes the back that the OLB goes after either to hit and ricochet, cover in a 5 yard zone for potential screen, or obviously tackle if he got the ball.  correct?

The way I've understood things is that the OLB takes the first 'Back out of the backfield.

Mission Statement: To make a genuine effort at every opportunity to help those around me build and maintain a commitment to success.


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cougarfootball
(@cougarfootball)
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Makes sense on the DE, except I thought if the OT came out toward the DE, the read for the DE was to go inside him and get behind him?  He is supposed to contact him for 3 steps of the OT blocks down or comes out to get the LB. 

On "he" I actually was talking about the outside linebacker, but didn't specify that. But your answer on the spread question about the first back pretty much confirms what I was thinking...that the OLB should hit the first back that appears on the outside shoulder and ricochet. 

Thanks!


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Monster
(@monster)
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Joined: 9 years ago
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Makes sense on the DE, except I thought if the OT came out toward the DE, the read for the DE was to go inside him and get behind him?  He is supposed to contact him for 3 steps of the OT blocks down or comes out to get the LB. 

On "he" I actually was talking about the outside linebacker, but didn't specify that. But your answer on the spread question about the first back pretty much confirms what I was thinking...that the OLB should hit the first back that appears on the outside shoulder and ricochet. 

Thanks!

Clark has done a bit of modifying regarding the DE's play in the Manual, so make sure that you're reading the most recent one. The reason I say that is because I want to make sure you're getting the most accurate information that's available. As I understand it, the instruction to the DE is to go where that foot goes.

Now make sure you come back to this thread as there should be other coaches with more experience than I who may give you a better explanation.

Mission Statement: To make a genuine effort at every opportunity to help those around me build and maintain a commitment to success.


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cougarfootball
(@cougarfootball)
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Yep, it's the current manual.  It says: "On “Outside Zone”, #2’s takes a sideways step with his outside foot first and then
goes straight ahead trying to reach block our DE. The outside foot always faces
straight ahead. That foot tells our DE to go inside that block when the runner is
going outside. And so the DE does what looks like the “wrong” thing.
Actually though, he’s doing the “right” thing."

So I guess by cutting inside the OT who is trying to reach the DE, the DE shows up unblocked and can tackle the back before he gets outside?


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Dimson
(@dimson)
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The main job of the DEs is to keep the Mike and Safeties clean and rush the passer on a pass. At least that is what I have gathered.


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DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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I have a couple of questions about this killer bee we plan to implement.  I may also know the answers...let's see!

1.  The DE reads the OT outside foot, and if the OT’s outside foot comes out at him, he goes inside the OT, but does not cross the LOS.    If he goes behind/inside him, does he not get himself boxed out from tackling the back running off tackle, or is he supposed to get inside/behind the OT quick enough to make the tackle?  I am thinking that is what he is doing.

Monster summed up the position well.  But when the OT steps at you, we can't race him to where he's going or we'd be going backwards so we race him to "where he was".

The OT will come at our DE for one of two reasons:

1) He's getting tired of being three step hit by the DE when he guns for Mike.  So he hits the DE hitting him.
2) It's Inside Zone blocking.

Either way, GO INSIDE the OT.  Because, if our DT slants INSIDE at the center and our DE slants OUTSIDE the OT, then a great big HOLE opens up between the DT and the DE.  The OT should miss that block on a recessed DE and blow up the Inside Zone.  No need to three step him.

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
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So I guess by cutting inside the OT who is trying to reach the DE, the DE shows up unblocked and can tackle the back before he gets outside?

No.  He just covers that big HOLE I described in my last post.  Otherwise, the back might see it and cut back inside.

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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