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Flipping the Offense?

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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Posted by: @mahonz

Back in my double pulling days we never flipped. 

Wish I had. Its a task finding 4 effective pullers. Flipping would have been a better use of our limited time IMHO. 

You don't find them, you teach them.  I've never had a pulling lineman that I "found."

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
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Interesting topic at a time when Coach Wyatt's Zoom clinic this past Tuesday was about flipping your offense.  Using MY personnel.  His last North Carolina clinic was with my 2017 EWHS squad.  Of course when he taught it, it not only looked great but my players had no problems adapting to changing sides, foot stagger, or hand down.  In watching this time-capsule the other night, I marveled at how effortlessly my kids could implement his install, and how much clunkier mine was.  The problem isn't in the system; it's with the teacher not knowing the how/where/when/why.  Wyatt's teaching looks simple and effortless, simply because he knows exactly what and how to teach.

 --Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @coachdp
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

How so? This was DW, right?

Yes, Double Wing.  It was a tell that hampered us, losing the misdirection aspect of the offense.

That's what I've always thought about a balanced formation.  If you're going to have a tell, take it all the way, but if you don't want to have a tell, don't compromise on that.

But IIRC, you do like offsetting the FB, right?  Or do I have you mixed up with another coach?


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @coachsteel

We run wing T and we flip. We have our strong side and what I call our “quick” side of the OL. I think the biggest advantage to it is the amount of time you can get splitting your O line in half to work on specific plays run to each side. I have two O-line coaches, one who is in charge of the strong side and one in charge of the quick side. I also spend the majority of time with the line. That way, throughout the season I can have my strong side working on Down, and Buck series while my quick side works on Belly, Belly sweep and dive (we run a quick side dive instead of trap) We only pull our strong side guard so I only have to identify one starting pulling guard and one backup. I’ve had more success just having my backside guard cutting off a LB than I have pulling them and actually leading through the hole to get a hat on a backer. I just feel like flipping cuts down on the amount of plays the kids have to learn, and we become way more efficient in getting kids reps on the plays where their blocks are key to the success of the play. 

Have you considered having both a dive and a trap in your playbook?

Regarding having the more mobile guard cut off a LB in front of the line makes sense in that if he's fast enough to get around on the pull, he should be quick enough to cut off that LB in space.  The logic of pulling has always seemed to me to be that if your OL are too slow to cut off a LB ahead of the hole, you make the LB come to the hole and meet him in that more delimited space.  The only problem is that we're trying to release blockers who don't need to adjust their GDB angle much to cut off a flowing LB, while the back side G doesn't have that luxury; our guards might even collide.


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terrypjohnson
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I coach 8U (hoping to move up 10U since I live in North Georgia now) and didn't flip the line. We tried it my first year and we had too many problems getting lined up correctly. Since my team was hampered by low numbers and injuries, I could imagine how hard it would be to teach it if I had to move kids to different positions.

With that said, Coach @bob-goodman 's logic (e.g. with flip with 100 and 900, why not flip more than just the backs) makes a lot of sense. If I were coaching older kids, I would definitely give this a try.

I also saw a lot of people commenting about flipping because they only had one puller. I would solve that problem by going unbalanced and putting your puller to the unbalanced side right next to the center. He'll have roughly the same distance to pull either way. I had some success with this the last two years when I ran some plays from Coach Cox's Power Rifle series (those are still up in custom systems... worth a read!).

Coach Terry

 

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Posted by: @coachdp
Posted by: @mahonz

Back in my double pulling days we never flipped. 

Wish I had. Its a task finding 4 effective pullers. Flipping would have been a better use of our limited time IMHO. 

You don't find them, you teach them.  I've never had a pulling lineman that I "found."

--Dave

LOL That's funny. Thinking about all of the Fat Freddy with quads of jello over the years.

The main reason I stopped pulling entirely. 

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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