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Making sure that I fully understand how to attack in the Double Wing  

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Prodigy
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September 10, 2020 10:58 am  
Posted by: @coachdp

 

--And THAT is the key to angle blocking and why I was bad at teaching it for quite a while.  If there was a gap in the defensive line, our o-lineman was on his way to the 2nd level because he had no Level 1 defender and this was leaving a hole in the wall.  This is when we developed our Octagon-approach to blocking.

--Dave

 

that is a shortcoming of TKO that you have to be prepared for.  I don't think that many people speak on it and that might be why some people dislike it or say it doesn't work.  I taught it as a windshield wiper.  I don't care whatsoever where the defense is lined up, the wiper wipes together.  In hindsight, one "problem" with TKO is that it is extremely rudimentary, it works, it works well but there are probably much better ways of doing things that would take better advantage of an aggressive line.  If I had it to do over again and was stuck with using TKO, I would probably expand on it.  I'd come up with some drills where the TKO wall would "wipe" to a predetermined point on the field, probably to where the center started and then break apart and go looking to murder whoever is still standing.

I really liked Calande's Good God rules.  I think they were simple enough to answer any question about who to block and they covered pretty much any situation you could think of.  What I didn't like about the rules was that there were about 4 or 5 rules that the kids would have to learn and I'd have to coach.  I went for simplicity over flexibility and function.  For what we were doing at that point in time, TKO worked out just fine.  There's no need for a Lamborghini if you can win the race in a Mustang.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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September 10, 2020 11:27 am  
Posted by: @coachdp

Their inexperience tells them they they don't need a blocking system ("Why use a system?  All they have to do is block somebody.") So their focus is on backfield action, and since any sort of power running doesn't really work without a blocking system, they end up pitching it to their fast kid who just runs for his life.    

 

And any failure of a brilliantly designed play is the result of lack of effort on "the line".

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17466
North Carolina
High School
September 10, 2020 11:28 am  
Posted by: @prodigy

I coached against a team where Ty Law coached...and they had some tremendous athletes.  They had one player who they'd get the ball to and he would actually back up, towards his own end zone, to create space and lanes.  VERY UNSOUND.  He would do this and sucker defenders in and beat them with his agility.  I watched entire teams over penetrate, over pursue and get burned by this kid.  What's particularly interesting about this is that it's fairly hard to prepare for situations like this.  We spent an entire week going over how dangerous this player was and his modus operandi.  The very first time he got the ball, he burned my FB/OLB badly.  OLB seen the kill shot, went for it and failed to wrap him up.  I can see it in my minds eye but I can't see what the other 10 players were doing and how the kid managed to take it to the house...but he did.

Years ago, we played in the conference championship against this guy, Keith Marshall:

(Per USAToday):

Keith Marshall and Todd Gurley played together at Georgia from 2012-14.

Both signed with the Bulldogs as elite members of the 2012 recruiting class, where Marshall was the 13th-ranked player in the class (No. 1 RB) and Gurley ranked 73rd (No. 6 RB). Both hailed from North Carolina.

Their freshman year in Athens, the two, dubbed Gurshall, were unstoppable. Marshall hit you with blazing speed while Gurley was, well, Gurley.

They combined for 2,144 rushing yards and 27 total touchdowns.

Gurley left Georgia in 2014 and was taken with 10th pick by the Rams in the 2015 NFL Draft.

Marshall stayed an extra year, but was never the same after suffering a season ending injury his sophomore season.

But together, along with Aaron Murray, the two running backs gave Georgia a 2012 that we will never forget.

Unfortunately for Marshall, his NFL career did not last long. After running the fastest 40-yard dash at the 2016 NFL Scouting Combine with a time of 4.31 seconds, he was taken by the Washington Redskins in the seventh round of the 2016 draft. A torn patellar tendon in his right knee ended his NFL career in July of 2018.

His team was undefeated and his dad (their header and OC) was a former NFL player.  Keith was not only big, but extremely fast (for 9 & 10-year-old ball).  They were not only Sweep Left & Right, but Start Left Cut Right Cut In Cut Out Cut Back And Run Around.  He scored 2 touchdowns on us that day, but we won the game.  He was a heckuva talent who could take it the distance every time he touched the ball.  And with a real offensive scheme, he would have been unstoppable.  We've played against lesser Backs who gave us far more problems because of how good their scheme was.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Posts: 17466
North Carolina
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September 10, 2020 11:40 am  
Posted by: @prodigy

that is a shortcoming of TKO that you have to be prepared for.  I don't think that many people speak on it and that might be why some people dislike it or say it doesn't work.  I taught it as a windshield wiper.  I don't care whatsoever where the defense is lined up, the wiper wipes together. 

--Yes, the teaching notes should show that they have to work on the timing of the block, where the line is moving together.  If your line isn't cohesive in its timing, or one blasts off to Level 2 because he doesn't have a Level 1 defender, it doesn't work very well.  These were precisely the two problems I had when initially teaching it, and why I abandoned it.  We eventually returned to it when I learned better how to teach it.  

In hindsight, one "problem" with TKO is that it is extremely rudimentary, it works, it works well but there are probably much better ways of doing things that would take better advantage of an aggressive line.  If I had it to do over again and was stuck with using TKO, I would probably expand on it.  I'd come up with some drills where the TKO wall would "wipe" to a predetermined point on the field, probably to where the center started and then break apart and go looking to murder whoever is still standing.

--For us, it has never been our primary scheme, but used as a change up.  But then, we teach a variety of blocking schemes in our DW.

What I didn't like about the rules was that there were about 4 or 5 rules that the kids would have to learn and I'd have to coach.  I went for simplicity over flexibility and function. 

--When you are as pressed for time as you are in youth ball, simplicity should be the preference as long as it's SOUND.

There's no need for a Lamborghini if you can win the race in a Mustang.

--Exactly, which is why I bought this:

 --Dave

 

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17466
North Carolina
High School
September 10, 2020 11:45 am  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co
 
And any failure of a brilliantly designed play is the result of lack of effort on "the line".

Very true.  At least, that's what I keep hearing from other coaches.

I mean, if you don't want it, then you shouldn't even be out there.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Prodigy
(@prodigy)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2501
September 10, 2020 11:58 am  
Posted by: @coachdp

There's no need for a Lamborghini if you can win the race in a Mustang.

--Exactly, which is why I bought this:

 --Dave

 

That looks like it would be a ton of fun.  I was however referring to a horse... 🤣 

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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