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bignose
(@bignose)
Silver
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 915
July 2, 2020 4:46 pm  

Thanks for the video to clear things up.

This is the exact way I learned how to snap the ball circa 1966. I had a 2 bar facemask with a web suspension helmet, and got my jaw tatooed numerous times by a noseman's forearm.

It is very efficient in terms of option football because the ball is in the proper position for the mesh as the QB moves out from Center. The QB does not have to rotate the ball to the horizontal position.

I can see where this would be a useful way to snap the ball with younger, smaller players. It is secure on a wet field, and does not require big hands like a one handed, or dead snap does.

Coaching point:

If the Center turns the ball before he snaps it, so the laces are 90 degrees to the right side, the QB. should get the laces on the fingertips of his passing hand (right handed QB) on the snap. Opposite for a lefty QB.

Coaches used to teach "crossed thumbs" (make a butterfly) to keep the QBs hands from separating on the snap. I think that this can lead to jammed thumbs, therefore I teach the grip I mentioned above where there is a "stagger" to the thumbs. Fingers against the inside of the Center's thighs. Press upwards with the hands so the Center can "feel" the target.

 

 

You rush a miracle man, you get rotten miracles!


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9393
Coach
July 2, 2020 7:37 pm  
Posted by: @bob-goodman
Posted by: @bucksweep58
Posted by: @gumby_in_co
Posted by: @bucksweep58
 
wishbone snap

Please explain.

Look at the center. I don't know what else to call this other than "wishbone snap" bc of this. 

 

I don't either, but it needs a better name, and thanks a lot for the video.

If I'm seeing it right, the quarterback's taking the snap like fielding a ground ball.  His fingers are pointing down, and the snapper is leaving the ball fairly low and point down.

The advantage I see is that the QB is scooping the ball up, so might be less likely to drop it.  The disadvantage I see is that he needs to scoop the ball up.  The trade might be worthwhile, might not, depending on the abilities of the players and what the QB's immediately subsequent moves need to be.

In most C-QB exchanges, the snapper does most of the work getting the ball up into where the QB would like; in this one it's the QB himself who has to do most of that job.  And yet the snapper's using 2 hands with pendulum action much as for a long snap.  In the examples shown, he's not stepping with the snap; instead the snap motion loads his hips, and he has to spring back up.

We call the QB hands "choke the chicken" lol thumbs together, hands open, thumbs at base of centers cup.  It's perfect and does not require an eternity to master and less rotation in the QB hands. 

 

There was a dw coach that did it this aswell forget the name tho. 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4145
July 2, 2020 8:05 pm  
Posted by: @bucksweep58
Posted by: @gumby_in_co
Posted by: @bucksweep58
 
wishbone snap

Please explain.

Look at the center. I don't know what else to call this other than "wishbone snap" bc of this. 

 

Ah cool. I've had centers do this in extremely adverse conditions when we just couldn't get a 1 handed snap off. Now, I'm thinking we maybe ought to teach it as the regular snap.  Hell, this might be a cure for our direct (shotgun) snap woes. It sure couldn't hurt.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 9503
New Jersey
3rd - 5th
Asst Coach
July 2, 2020 9:43 pm  
Posted by: @bucksweep58
Posted by: @bob-goodman
Posted by: @bucksweep58
Posted by: @gumby_in_co
Posted by: @bucksweep58
 
wishbone snap

Please explain.

Look at the center. I don't know what else to call this other than "wishbone snap" bc of this. 

 

I don't either, but it needs a better name, and thanks a lot for the video.

If I'm seeing it right, the quarterback's taking the snap like fielding a ground ball.  His fingers are pointing down, and the snapper is leaving the ball fairly low and point down.

The advantage I see is that the QB is scooping the ball up, so might be less likely to drop it.  The disadvantage I see is that he needs to scoop the ball up.  The trade might be worthwhile, might not, depending on the abilities of the players and what the QB's immediately subsequent moves need to be.

In most C-QB exchanges, the snapper does most of the work getting the ball up into where the QB would like; in this one it's the QB himself who has to do most of that job.  And yet the snapper's using 2 hands with pendulum action much as for a long snap.  In the examples shown, he's not stepping with the snap; instead the snap motion loads his hips, and he has to spring back up.

We call the QB hands "choke the chicken" lol thumbs together, hands open, thumbs at base of centers cup.  It's perfect and does not require an eternity to master and less rotation in the QB hands. 

So then did I see your video wrong?


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9393
Coach
July 3, 2020 12:23 am  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co
Posted by: @bucksweep58
Posted by: @gumby_in_co
Posted by: @bucksweep58
 
wishbone snap

Please explain.

Look at the center. I don't know what else to call this other than "wishbone snap" bc of this. 

 

Ah cool. I've had centers do this in extremely adverse conditions when we just couldn't get a 1 handed snap off. Now, I'm thinking we maybe ought to teach it as the regular snap.  Hell, this might be a cure for our direct (shotgun) snap woes. It sure couldn't hurt.

We do 2 hands for the lil guys  if there's a gun we deadball snap so easy transition. I did this in my chuck n duck polecat contraption I ran with the 14u.  Need any insight shoot me some dm's 🙂

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9393
Coach
July 3, 2020 12:27 am  
Posted by: @bob-goodman
Posted by: @bucksweep58
Posted by: @bob-goodman
Posted by: @bucksweep58
Posted by: @gumby_in_co
Posted by: @bucksweep58
 
wishbone snap

Please explain.

Look at the center. I don't know what else to call this other than "wishbone snap" bc of this. 

 

I don't either, but it needs a better name, and thanks a lot for the video.

If I'm seeing it right, the quarterback's taking the snap like fielding a ground ball.  His fingers are pointing down, and the snapper is leaving the ball fairly low and point down.

The advantage I see is that the QB is scooping the ball up, so might be less likely to drop it.  The disadvantage I see is that he needs to scoop the ball up.  The trade might be worthwhile, might not, depending on the abilities of the players and what the QB's immediately subsequent moves need to be.

In most C-QB exchanges, the snapper does most of the work getting the ball up into where the QB would like; in this one it's the QB himself who has to do most of that job.  And yet the snapper's using 2 hands with pendulum action much as for a long snap.  In the examples shown, he's not stepping with the snap; instead the snap motion loads his hips, and he has to spring back up.

We call the QB hands "choke the chicken" lol thumbs together, hands open, thumbs at base of centers cup.  It's perfect and does not require an eternity to master and less rotation in the QB hands. 

So then did I see your video wrong?

Bob,

 

The dw coach I was referring to is high Wyatt.

 

http://www.coachwyatt.com/center-qb.html

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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