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DumCoach
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So lets say we're defending spread twins with two crossing receivers.  One may rub coverage off the other or no rub at all.  How do you defend it?

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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sabot6d
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Until someone shows us they can beat us we are in zone almost exclusively. My LBs come up with their own weird little code words to warn their neighbor of crossing routes so if it's the inside receivers out of 2x2 crossing my will could be yelling pizza to get Mike's attention of a crosser coming his way. Mike will be yelling something equally ridiculous to inform will of a crosser coming his way so they can both break off and pick up the transition.


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PSLCOACHROB
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So lets say we're defending spread twins with two crossing receivers.  One may rub coverage off the other or no rub at all.  How do you defend it?

With a really good pass rush.


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ZACH
 ZACH
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So lets say we're defending spread twins with two crossing receivers.  One may rub coverage off the other or no rub at all.  How do you defend it?

Never faced mesh at youth, in high school we had used a lot of match coverage and robber vs crossing routes.

My opinion the mesh with slots is easier to defend then slot and back out.

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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blockandtackle
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So lets say we're defending spread twins with two crossing receivers.  One may rub coverage off the other or no rub at all.  How do you defend it?

Zone defense.  Probably Cov. 2 or Cov. 3 to get more underneath defenders to wall off the crossers.  Crossing routes are typically meant to exploit man and try to flood one area of the zone.

Focus on making sure the receivers are denied a clean inside release.  Whoever you've got on those slots need to be up close to those receivers and wall them off.

Then you need your hook/curl players (probably LBs) to really keep their eyes open for crossers to wall off and collision them solidly when they're trying to come across.  If the ball's not yet in the air, this is legal in most places.  Be physical, get underneath the receiver, and give him a shot with your shoulder and forearm.

LBs collisioning the crossers is what kills Mesh and Shallow plays.  Offenses can have ways to adjust--usually by turning those crossing routes into pivots that wind up in the same spot as the opposite field crosser--but you need to make them adjust first.

A good pass rush helps, but you can't rely on it to get there every time.


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CHARLIEDONTSURF
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Then you need your hook/curl players (probably LBs) to really keep their eyes open for crossers to wall off and collision them solidly when they're trying to come across.  If the ball's not yet in the air, this is legal in most places.  Be physical, get underneath the receiver, and give him a shot with your shoulder and forearm.

Ha most folks don't seem to know this, including me my first few years.

5 yard bump-and-run may be one of the most "smuggled-in" rules in youth ball haha.


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CHARLIEDONTSURF
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So lets say we're defending spread twins with two crossing receivers.  One may rub coverage off the other or no rub at all.  How do you defend it?

When you say "no rub at all," I assume you mean crossers at different levels, like a dig-shallow (or same direction, like flanker drive), yes?


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spidermac
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We teach MIKE if someone crosses in front of him, blow him up...we also ran the MESH concept last season, with moderate success...if the QB got the ball out on time it was great, if he held it to long he generally threw it right to SAM or WILL.

But back to the question, we never faced MESH, we saw a boat load of flood concepts, and play action trying to get the safeties and the corners to come up, but generally speaking, they did their jobs and didn't bite on PA. So like Rob said, good pass rush and MIKE blowing up any crosser in his grass would be what we would do...

None of them suck, they just haven't found what the kid is good at yet.


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Bob Goodman
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So lets say we're defending spread twins with two crossing receivers.  One may rub coverage off the other or no rub at all.  How do you defend it?

Where are they x-ing?  Right off the line, or downfield?

I know when you write "rub" to do it legally it'd have to be right off the line...but this is kiddie ball, where you might have a 2- or 3-man officiating crew.  Good luck getting that interference call if they do it downfield just a few times a game!


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Bob Goodman
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With a really good pass rush.

That has the benefit of practically eliminating the downfield crossing pattern.  But against a good rush, a team's going to want to have more quick passes, including the rub at the line, so you still need a plan.

Offhand, mine would be to have 1 defender step inside for the quick ball, the other lay back.  Make them lob the ball over the inside defender, giving the other one time to come up.


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PSLCOACHROB
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We had a plan Bob. We ran zone. For shallow crosses we handed off the coverage with good communication. Blow guys up when it is legal. Rubs and all that isn't a huge concern with zone. You aren't going to knock my guy off coverage because their is only one defender in the zone.


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DumCoach
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Topic starter  

When you say "no rub at all," I assume you mean crossers at different levels, like a dig-shallow (or same direction, like flanker drive), yes?

They cross but without contacting (picking) the coverage.

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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DumCoach
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We had a plan Bob. We ran zone. For shallow crosses we handed off the coverage with good communication. Blow guys up when it is legal. Rubs and all that isn't a huge concern with zone. You aren't going to knock my guy off coverage because their is only one defender in the zone.

So in your zone, when two receivers cross say behind your safeties, your DB's change receivers?  Doesn't that take them from following a receiver from inside to outside?

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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DumCoach
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Zone defense.

And if they cross behind your safeties?

Focus on making sure the receivers are denied a clean inside release.  Whoever you've got on those slots need to be up close to those receivers and wall them off.

This part I have.

Then you need your hook/curl players (probably LBs) to really keep their eyes open for crossers to wall off and collision them solidly when they're trying to come across.  If the ball's not yet in the air, this is legal in most places.  Be physical, get underneath the receiver, and give him a shot with your shoulder and forearm.

LBs collisioning the crossers is what kills Mesh and Shallow plays.

I have this too but if they cross without a pick or rub and throw early, does a yellow flag fly?

A good pass rush helps, but you can't rely on it to get there every time.

I have an LB execute a delayed blitz.

Do I sound good?

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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gumby_in_co
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In all the different defenses we've run over the years, we've always stuck with KB alignments. Vs Twins, CB would be 7x3 off the #1. OLB or Spur would be 5x2 off #2. Then, we play Mahonz' version of "catch man". The alignment rules only serve to put the defender in the best place geometrically to do his job. I had the CBs doing a 3 step shuffle and the OLB/Spur stomping the bee. I think last year, Mahonz replaced "kill the bee" with "smoosh smoosh". Either way, CBs and OLBs/Spurs have that amount of time to make their read on the intended destination of the receivers. Basic rule is that if a guy enters my zone, I pick him up and cover him until the whistle.  If 2 guys enter my zone, that's a mistake because I can now cover 2 guys.

Sounds crazy, but it worked well in 2 very pass/spread-heavy leagues.

My line of thinking is that an accurate QB who can throw on time can beat a zone. In my experience, you might as well call that a unicorn in youth ball. In 6 seasons, we faced exactly 1 QB that came close. In scouting him, I decided that 50% was a HELL of a completion percentage in youth. Anything better might be a problem. Anything worse and probably not. This kid went 6/13 and we won a close one.

[edit]

One important point is that just because you're aligned on a guy, doesn't mean he's "your guy". Once we got that point across, the pieces fell into place.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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