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COACH JC
(@winged)
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February 21, 2019 10:40 am  

We’re hosting some camps at a HS a couple times a month this offseason. I might try to do some videos then.

Once the season begins I don’t like doing anything that takes away from our team. So I doubt i’ll record practices.

I get what you’re saying tho. Just a lot you can’t show w/ a pen. Namely footwork & other subtleties.

It's all about having fun.  But losing aint fun!


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Coach Correa
(@coach-correa)
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Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1581
Head Coach
February 21, 2019 12:47 pm  

Similar to what Tito is doing with his I stuff on YouTube. You could also do videos of you doing demonstrations on the field. Similar to Clark's install videos.

Those are coming bye the way just rented a crossfit for 10 weeks to work with my group im a try and document the building of this run we bout to go on !!!!!

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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Coach Correa
(@coach-correa)
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February 21, 2019 1:21 pm  

The difference between a 5 and a 6i (aka 7) tech can be a little more than just playing C gap.

A 5 tech is going to attack the T and extend him out while keeping his hips outside the T.  He's also in a pretty good position to stunt across the T's face into B or even A gap (odd front teams call that "long sticking").

A 6i/7 tech, while still a C gap player, is going to be attacking the TE.  This disrupts the TE's release off the line, which will disrupt his timing on pass patterns but, even more importantly, will help keep him from blocking down cleanly on the LB.  The trade off, of course, is if you give the defense a B gap bubble the T now has a clean release to LB, so depending on how you have your DTs set that may cancel out protecting the LB.

As far as technique goes... they're pretty much flipped, for starters. You should align shade hand down, so if you're in an outside shade, then your inside hand--the hand that's shaded on the OL, will be the one in the dirt.  That means that an outside shade will have his inside hand down and his inside foot back.  An inside shade will have his outside hand down and his outside foot back.  The foot that's back is the one you step with--which affects where the DL's momentum goes on his first step.  He'll need to attack the near shoulder of the OL.  This is to help prevent being washed down if you're playing with inside leverage and help avoid being fanned out or reached if you're playing with outside leverage.  Eyes should go into the gap he's responsible for.

In terms of what the differences work out to be from an Xs and Os standpoint... obviously you're giving them leverage into one gap or the other, but there are some other things to consider.

An inside shade has excellent technique to shoot gaps inside and chase pullers on runs away.  They present a real problem to OL on pass protection and base blocks.  However, it's hard for an inside shade to stunt across a down block, so you can't really rely on them to stunt outside from that alignment.  The cardinal sin for an inside shade is getting scooped--he cannot let himself ever get scooped and his position makes it tough for the OL to do that.  A 2i will very seldom get trapped or read, but a 4i or 6i/7 tech will probably see a heavy dose of both, but they won't see as many double teams unless it's a zone team comboing them from the inside-out.  IMO, a 2i is a pretty forgiving technique to teach young DL who want to fly upfield for those reasons.

An outside shade, on the other hand, has outside leverage, so he's in better position to keep his outside arm free to play contain and box everything to the inside if you want to do that.  He can still spill, as well.  Outside shades also have an easier time stunting to the inside, simply because of how blocking schemes work.  The cardinal sin for an outside shade is getting reached--he's got to maintain that outside leverage and never, ever let the OL get his hips around him to hook him.  Outside shades, particularly the 3 tech or a 5 tech DE when there's a TE in the game, will also see quite a few more double teams so they need to be able to hold up there.

Great post Coach a lot of nuggets here.....

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
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Florida
February 21, 2019 3:12 pm  

Coach A(Block & Tackle)

Great post as usual, lots of info. Good info & just a few realize it.

IMHO the key difference between a 5 & 6I is how to leverage the offense. Now, I agree with about the proper way to play each is with the near hand on the ground. However, I have coached that way, but I am a firm believer in Strong Hand down. Having both played & coached switching hands, I just think it's a click faster with the strong hand down.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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February 21, 2019 3:34 pm  

Great post Coach a lot of nuggets here.....

Thanks, coach.  I really appreciate that.

I just caught one mistake in what I wrote, though...

I said that having the inside hand down and stepping with the inside foot first helps keep a DL from getting reached.  That's not exactly true.  It helps keep him from getting fanned, but the first step with the inside foot brings his momentum inside and can makes him a little easier to reach.

That's why if you want to play contain with your DEs and box everything to the inside--a technique where they absolutely, positively must make not getting reached their #1 priority--they should have their inside foot up and outside foot back.  That means they step with the outside foot, which gets their hips a little wider and outside fo the reach block.

I like a 2 pt. stance for this so they can see better, too.  They have to keep the outside arm free at all times--some old school coaches will even coach them to practice with that arm sticking straight out to the side so they get in the habit of keeping it free.  They can use it to punch the OL and get off a block, but that's about the only time they can use it when they're not going for a tackle.

This technique is for when he's the EMOL--a 9 tech vs. a TE or a 5 tech if there is no TE, like in an old 5-2 defense.

The trade off is that while they're sounder against the sweep when they play this way, they're a little softer off tackle to getting kicked out on Power and plays like that.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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February 21, 2019 3:43 pm  

What Tito is doing is awesome imo. First off, Tito knows his stuff so what he is putting out is good info. Second, it's friggin free. How much work can you put into it for free.


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Coach Correa
(@coach-correa)
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February 21, 2019 4:39 pm  

Thank You Rob it's all for my love of Coaching and trying to give back. Coaching saved my life and i do it for the love not anything else. 

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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February 22, 2019 4:19 am  

Thank You Rob it's all for my love of Coaching and trying to give back. Coaching saved my life and i do it for the love not anything else.

You're doing the Lord's work, man!


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defensewins
(@defensewins)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 662
February 27, 2019 11:39 am  

What is the difference in techniques between a 5,6i and 6 techs on the d-line?

In different systems that I have been in a 5 tech was: outside shade of OT and the left side head up on the TE.  The point is, there are many different systems of numbering/labeling techniques for defense.  But, I'll venture a guess as to the system...
5 = outside shad OT
6i = inside shade TE
6 = head up on TE


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