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Does anybody have a good spill technique drill?


John Doe
(@john-doe)
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Thanks


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Machine Gun Drill.

Line your DE up against 4 or 5 blockers in a row with a cone set 5 yards back approximating where a sweep will be by the time he gets there.
Have him play his usual "outside arm free" rip technique one after another.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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Spill vs wrong arm?

Defending sweep, trap, lead block?

Spill is what was already said, getting the runner to retreat before comming forward.

These are easiest if you "attack" all lead blocks with the intention of "tuning them up". Less is more if they cant "tune" , either teach ricochet or wrong arm.

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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dcooz
(@dcooz)
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What's wrong arm?


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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What's wrong arm?

You hit everything with the "wrong arm" or outside arm

http://www.dumcoach.com/general-defense-discussion/understanding-wrong-arming/

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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dcooz
(@dcooz)
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Thanks Zach


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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Thanks

Are you looking for one to drill the DL as they take on and spill kick out blocks or are you looking for something to work on teaching 2nd and 3rd level defenders in force how to "clean up the spill?"

For DL, it's important to teach them their basic block reactions first.  Line them up across from an OL, who you'll give a blocking assignment and the DL knows that his gap is on one side of the OL or the other.  They have to attack the OL with proper leverage, steps, and hand placement with eyes in the gap react to his block--if he bases or reaches they fight the pressure and keep their hips in the hole and eyes in their gap.  If he blocks down, they're already punching him so they'll naturally be drawn to fit tight off his hip with no space between them.  From here, they need to get their eyes inside through their gap to find and attack the first threat, whatever that is: either a dive back or a kick out block (which could be a back or a pulling OL).  A lot of people refer to this as "Block Down, Step Down" rules or BDSD for short.

So that teaches the first part of the spill: the basic block reactions that get them in position to spill it without flying upfield and getting kicked out.  I don't like to just coach "penetration" in a spilling defense because that leads to kids flying upfield and getting kicked out or opening up vertical seams, which usually leads to coaches telling them "get upfield... but not too far" which leads to soft and tentative play.  Attack the OL and make him your first target.  That keeps them in position to defend things at the LOS and spill.

The second part of spilling is to teach them the actual spill technique, which is really pretty simple.  They need to turn that kick out block inside out by taking their outside arm and ripping it across the face of the blocker who's coming to kick them out and "run the circle" to get their hips around and loop around the block to turn it inside-out and get back into pursuit.  If you see a triple option team, they also need to learn how to tell the difference between a dive and a kick out, but most kids can see that pretty easily when the QB pokes the ball into the back's belly.

One drill I like to teach the second part is to set them up with an OL and a FB or pulling G holding a hand shield.  Simulate a snap and have the DL react to the OL's block.  If the OL blocks down, DL should squeeze off his hip and be in position to spill, then he'll attack the shield-holding FB when he comes to kick him out.  Take the outside arm and rip it through the kick out man's inside armpit, getting your outside shoulder pad into his near number.

Again, he's not just wrong-arming and ripping inside of the block with his outside shoulder--he's going to keep his legs running and inside arm free while he hook around inside the block to get his hips around and rip underneath the kick out block's inside armpit to stay in pursuit.  Never give yourself up 1 for 1 on defense--that's called "getting blocked" and it's a victory for the offense.

For the Force player on the second or third level who's cleaning up the spill, he needs to fit off the spill and maintain outside leverage at all time.  That means he'll keep the ball carrier on his inside hip while tracking the ball carrier's outside hip.  He needs to keep his outside arm free at all times to make a play and can never, ever get reached.  Anyone inside of the force player should be tracking the ball carrier's near hip--usually going to be the inside hip--as they pursue.  You can rep this in team pursuit drills and perimeter drill--half line perimeter drill may be good at first to get them in the hang of spilling.

Now, again... you need to teach the kids how to apply these rules to different plays, which is easier than it sounds.  DL basically just need to protect their gap and let nothing come between their hips and the gap they're defending.  ILBs need to fit in any holes that show and pursue near hip.  Force players need to keep outside arm free and make sure nothing gets outside of them by taking good angles and keeping the widest man's outside hip on their near hip.  Once you do that... defending Veer, Midline, or Zone Read really becomes no different from defending Power, Counter, or Trap.  DL plays BDSD and attacks first threat (kick out or dive), Force player gets the widest man and keeps him inside (spilled ball carrier, QB keeper on a zone read, or pitch back), LBs overlap with the DL in a natural scrape exchange and fit to the inside of anything that's spilled off the DL (QB on options or spilled ball carrier)


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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^ This is understanding a drill.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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