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Help stoping wedge blocking of a Warner Single wing offense  

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mmartinez
(@mmartinez)
Copper
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7
November 15, 2019 10:12 am  

I coach: 11-12 year olds, 90 - 120lbs weight restriction
11 man football... Chicagoland area... COLD!!!!

We are playing our Superbowl game on Sunday.
The team we are playing runs a Warner Single Wing offense.
The center snaps the ball to 3 possible backs
Their offensive line runs a wedge blocking scheme
Their concept is to gain 4-5 yards per play. Slowly work their way down the field. EAT up as much time as possible. They will easily eat up a whole quarter doing so. Ware you down play by play. They limit your offensive possessions to 2-3 per game. They score 12 points per game and have blanked 7 of 10 of their opponents. Not because their defense is good. Its because they limit you possessions, you have to play mistake free offense.

My question..... help with....

How do we slow down the wedge defensively??? How many defensive lineman do we need to have? Placement of the DL, in gap or straight in front of OL?
I can figure these out but I need help making sure I am not missing anything

THANK YOU


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mmartinez
(@mmartinez)
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spidermac
(@spidermac)
Gold
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 2440
November 15, 2019 10:22 am  

I'd take a look at a 63 front against a wedging team...

None of them suck, they just haven't found what the kid is good at yet.


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DumCoach
(@dumcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 8619
November 15, 2019 12:53 pm  

You can pretty much stop any SW team with just three players:

              E        N        E
                OO0OOOO
                        O        O
                    OO

E's do not have contain.  Crash the E's to get right behind the TE's and run right at the BB back for a big collision right behind the TE.  This kills the kickout.  No outside hole!
Back N 18 inches off the pulling guard (PG).  If PG steps forward the play is wedge.  N cuts him.  If PG pulls, N pulls with him turning upfield at first opportunity.  This will cause him to collide with PG.  PG can no longer wrap the hole.  No inside hole!

Game over.  The other 8 defenders can watch while eating popcorn and hotdogs on the sideline.   

"Football is for the kids - But let's win anyway."


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Wing-n-It
(@robert)
Platinum Moderator
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 3872
United States
November 15, 2019 1:58 pm  

Freaking Clark beat me to it. The one time I could help someone with some real info...... 😀

The DEs as Clark stated are huge to this type of D.
You HAVE to close down the C Gap. shove the blocking back (kick out guy) back into the gap. The collision if the DE is fast enough will happen very close to the C gap. He will have to go infront of the WB who is usually log blocking a LB.

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 9503
New Jersey
3rd - 5th
Asst Coach
November 15, 2019 2:22 pm  

The team we are playing runs a Warner Single Wing offense.
The center snaps the ball to 3 possible backs
Their offensive line runs a wedge blocking scheme

A wedge blocking scheme?!  Looks like a serious waste of a single wing system.

Is the same position the apex every time?

There are few possibilities for an offense that wedge blocks everything, and on the same apex.  You can run wedge, wedge pass, sucker wedge off tackle, or sucker wedge end run.  The sucker plays are at a numbers disadvantage and so require very successful deception -- defense over-committing players they don't need to.

As to the wedge itself, if they're doing it so predictably, you don't even have to read it as Clark suggests.  Just absolutely bar the wedge by having a DL a half or full position away crab across the apex, every snap.  The only wedge they can still work with your doing that is either a wedge on a different apex -- and even that won't work that well -- or the second level wedge that's been described here.  If this team isn't prepared with this bypass type play, you've taken away their weapon with very little effort.

Then the only thing left to defend against is wedge pass.  I'll let you work that out.

There's a reason Dave Cisar hasn't put heavy reliance on wedge in many years: too hard against a prepared defense, so it's good only if the element of surprise is preserved.  That doesn't look like a team that "runs a wedge blocking scheme".

Please tell me your description was oversimplified and that a 12U team didn't get that far with just wedge blocking.


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
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Joined: 9 years ago
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New Jersey
3rd - 5th
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November 15, 2019 2:35 pm  

Bringing down the wedge of an unbalanced line that wedges on its center (not snapper) is even easier than against a balanced line, because the apex player has to first get ahead of the snapper.  In a balanced line, the center is the snapper and if he's the apex he needs just some short adjustment steps to get going, and he may be able to beat your crabber-across if said crabber-across is slow.  From unbalanced, the much longer steps the apex player needs to take virtually guarantee your crabber's flank will be in his lap by the time that wedge tries to get moving.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
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Posts: 17389
North Carolina
High School
November 15, 2019 4:26 pm  

A wedge blocking scheme?!  Looks like a serious waste of a single wing system.

My thoughts exactly, Bob.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
Silver Moderator
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 694
Virginia
Middle School
Only / Head Coach
November 17, 2019 2:29 pm  

You can pretty much stop any SW team with just three players:

              E        N        E
                OO0OOOO
                        O        O
                    OO

E's do not have contain.  Crash the E's to get right behind the TE's and run right at the BB back for a big collision right behind the TE.  This kills the kickout.  No outside hole!
Back N 18 inches off the pulling guard (PG).  If PG steps forward the play is wedge.  N cuts him.  If PG pulls, N pulls with him turning upfield at first opportunity.  This will cause him to collide with PG.  PG can no longer wrap the hole.  No inside hole!

Game over.  The other 8 defenders can watch while eating popcorn and hotdogs on the sideline. 

That's funny, Clark!  Good one!  8 guys eating popcorn 😉

Crash the ends / cut the middle!  No one has ever tried that!  At least, not more than 6 or 7 games this season.  Guess again. 


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9393
Coach
November 18, 2019 3:05 am  

That's funny, Clark!  Good one!  8 guys eating popcorn 😉

Crash the ends / cut the middle!  No one has ever tried that!  At least, not more than 6 or 7 games this season.  Guess again.

My dad can beat up your dad ! Lmao

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
Silver Moderator
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 694
Virginia
Middle School
Only / Head Coach
November 18, 2019 4:24 am  

My dad can beat up your dad ! Lmao

Yeah, but my mom will whip his tail!


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rpatric
(@rpatric)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 165
Maryland
6th - 8th
Head Coach
March 20, 2020 11:59 am  

You can slow down a wedge play by throwing bodies in the path of it. The real problem occurs after you have devoted your resources to it. Sure, you can "stop" the wedge, but in doing so you leave yourself extremely vulnerable to the entirety of the rest of the playbook. If I were running into a team that could hold my wedge to > 5 yds per carry, I'd consider that slowed down and likely attack elsewhere.


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