Translation from pr...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Translation from practice to game

Page 1 / 2

RoHi
 RoHi
(@rhoibcekrst)
Copper
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

Hello Coaches,

I have been an assistant coach for some years and now have stepped into a head coach for a 5th & 6th grade team, I still assist the 7th & 8th grade team.  I have a lot of first year players on the 5th & 6th grade team.  We teach crawl, walk, run...we rep it as much as we can and send those that aren't getting the drill with a coach to get trained up, while we keep the rest getting reps.  I would love to get feedback on what other coaches do to get kids to be aggressive against an opponent.  In practice, they are really aggressive with each other, however come game day, I've had kids fight to come off the field vs complaining about not getting playing time.  We get smacked in the mouth.  I can see in the game and especially on film the kids are in position to make the tackle but will slow up, reach, or just slide pass the runner instead of making the tackle.  I really am at a loss of why they are so aggressive in practice with their own teammates but not against an opponent this year.  Any and all feedback is greatly welcomed.

"Hook'Em"


Quote
Pearls of Wisdom
(@pearls-of-wisdom)
Platinum
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 4446
 

Hello Coaches,

I have been an assistant coach for some years and now have stepped into a head coach for a 5th & 6th grade team, I still assist the 7th & 8th grade team.  I have a lot of first year players on the 5th & 6th grade team.  We teach crawl, walk, run...we rep it as much as we can and send those that aren't getting the drill with a coach to get trained up, while we keep the rest getting reps.  I would love to get feedback on what other coaches do to get kids to be aggressive against an opponent.  In practice, they are really aggressive with each other, however come game day, I've had kids fight to come off the field vs complaining about not getting playing time.  We get smacked in the mouth.  I can see in the game and especially on film the kids are in position to make the tackle but will slow up, reach, or just slide pass the runner instead of making the tackle.  I really am at a loss of why they are so aggressive in practice with their own teammates but not against an opponent this year.  Any and all feedback is greatly welcomed.

ON MENTAL TOUGHNESS:  “Mental toughness is to physical as four is to one.”

My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com


ReplyQuote
Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 9861
 

I have been an assistant coach for some years and now have stepped into a head coach for a 5th & 6th grade team, I still assist the 7th & 8th grade team.  I have a lot of first year players on the 5th & 6th grade team.  We teach crawl, walk, run...we rep it as much as we can and send those that aren't getting the drill with a coach to get trained up, while we keep the rest getting reps.  I would love to get feedback on what other coaches do to get kids to be aggressive against an opponent.  In practice, they are really aggressive with each other, however come game day, I've had kids fight to come off the field vs complaining about not getting playing time.  We get smacked in the mouth.  I can see in the game and especially on film the kids are in position to make the tackle but will slow up, reach, or just slide pass the runner instead of making the tackle.  I really am at a loss of why they are so aggressive in practice with their own teammates but not against an opponent this year.

The only help I can give is to tell you that this is not at all unusual.  They don't have as much incentive to hit players they may never see again as they do the ones they practice against over & over.  If you played against the same team several times a season, you'd notice.


ReplyQuote
Coach_on_wheels
(@coach_on_wheels)
Copper
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 25
 

I am having the same problem.it is killing me.


ReplyQuote
hharris
(@hharris)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 123
 

In practice, they are really aggressive with each other, however come game day, I've had kids fight to come off the field vs complaining about not getting playing time.  We get smacked in the mouth.  I can see in the game and especially on film the kids are in position to make the tackle but will slow up, reach, or just slide pass the runner instead of making the tackle. 

Any player on our team that does this will be removed immediately from the playing field and replaced with an aggressive kid.  A coach will then have the removed player watch the agressive replacement and coach them on the sideline regarding proper fundamentals.  After a few plays, we will send the player back in with the instructions that they need to execute proper fundamentals or else they are coming out of the game again for a much longer time  😉


ReplyQuote
hharris
(@hharris)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 123
 

And I forgot to add that if they continue to do this, we will move them to another position.  For example, if my linebacker will not bring it in the game but acts all conference in practice, they will be moved to the D line for a wake up call.


ReplyQuote
ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 9637
 

By "demoting" a linebacker to def line and voicing it you just discredited your actual defensive line.

If this were my team ide be doing a lot of oklahoma with stud vs stud

Best rb and a lineman vs your linebacker givem 10 chances to be great be sure to switch the lineman never the back

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


ReplyQuote
Michael
(@michael)
Kryptonite
Joined: 14 years ago
Posts: 12890
 

By "demoting" a linebacker to def line and voicing it you just discredited your actual defensive line.

If you don't get to play O-Line, it's all the same, baby.

🙂

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


ReplyQuote
hharris
(@hharris)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 123
 

By "demoting" a linebacker to def line and voicing it you just discredited your actual defensive line.

If this were my team ide be doing a lot of oklahoma with stud vs stud

Best rb and a lineman vs your linebacker givem 10 chances to be great be sure to switch the lineman never the back

It's not a demotion.  My O line and D line have some of the most aggressive studs on my team.  When I put someone with the O or D line they realize they are going to have to fight to survive or get an a$$ beating.  It is an aggression wake up call that normally motivates players to try just as hard at their positions.  The past two days I had my ends go with our O and D line because they were lacking in aggression.  Within 5 minutes, the ends realized they were in an unrelenting battle and they were going to have to fight to survive.  It was awesome.  By the end of the drill we had some intense hitting going on.  The O and D lineman want to knock the snot out of the ends (it's new blood  🙂 ) and the ends get a chip on their shoulder and want to prove that no lineman is going to push them around.  We have a saying, "As the line goes, we go!"  If I walk up to any player on my team and say, "As the line goes", they will respond, "We go!"

And yes, I was stirring the pot the whole time.  "You aren't going to let him do that to you, are you?"  I had the kids all jacked up by the end.  Pushing, shoving, arguing, pissed off.  You name it.  At the end of practice they were still talking about who kicked who's a$$.  I'm sure it is a topic of discussion in school today  ;D

I have an 8th grader that was so pissed off that he got hammered by a 7th grader and we had to end the drill and go to team on the first day.  He never had a chance to redeem himself.  So guess who's lined up one on one in the drill before we even start on day 2.  You guessed it - the same two went to battle again.  After practice the second day the 8th grader says to me, " I think he is the best 7th grade player on the team".  They both earned each others respect.

That is why I send people to the trenches!


ReplyQuote
kcdeer
(@kcdeer)
Bronze
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 314
 

How/why do you replace a non-performing kid with an "aggressive" kid for a few plays to show him how it should be done?  Why are these "aggressive" reserves not starting on your defense?  Some/most youth coaches do not have the luxury of two platoon defenses.  And I don't believe shifting a linebacker to D Line will make him a. more aggressive or b. ultimately a better LB, if that is your intent.


ReplyQuote
hharris
(@hharris)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 123
 

How/why do you replace a non-performing kid with an "aggressive" kid for a few plays to show him how it should be done?  Why are these "aggressive" reserves not starting on your defense?  Some/most youth coaches do not have the luxury of two platoon defenses.  And I don't believe shifting a linebacker to D Line will make him a. more aggressive or b. ultimately a better LB, if that is your intent.

We have a two platoon system and all players play regardless of ability.  This year I have 22 players on my 7th grade team.  Every player plays half the game on offense and half on defense regardless of ability.  We will break the rotation to instruct and teach players but they will go back in the game.  Because of this, we always have someone who can rotate in at any position (even with an injury).  If I replace a player with someone who is not aggressive, then I will have a coach on the sideline work with them.  If I replace a player with someone who has better fundies or is more aggressive, I will have a coach on the sideline work with them and then have them watch the technique of the other player a few plays before sending them back in.

The original poster gave the example of players who are aggressive in practice but not in the game.  In that circumstance, moving them to another position is a huge wake up call.  As a coach, I know they can do it but for some reason they are refusing to do it in the game.  If I have tried everything else and can't motivate the player then I will move them.  At my school, I can't bench a player for lack of aggression because our system requires equal playing time.  Because of this, I have had to find ways to get the message across in other ways.  Over the years, taking a kid and moving them to another position has worked in most cases.

If you refuse to be aggressive in the game, we will find someone else who will be aggressive in the game.  Sending them to the D line is hopefully going to piss them off because they want to be a linebacker.  You could send them to be a corner, safety, end, or on the bench (which I can't do).  It doesn't matter, the intention is the same, either bring it in the game or you won't be at that position. 

This is different than the player who is not aggressive in practice but is aggressive in the game.  It is also different than the player who is giving maximum effort but has not mastered the fundamentals of the position.  Each circumstance requires different things to help motivate and teach the player.

Some of my methods may seem unorthodox but I have learned them over the years because I am now coaching at a middle school that requires that everyone has equal playing time.  On the flip side, it has made me a much better coach because I have to get everyone to play better or else we will get killed - especially the below average kids.  I have also had to learn how to balance my offense and defense in order to make up for ability and aggression differences.  For example, I will put my stronger QB with my weaker FB on one squad.  On the other, I will put my weaker QB with my stronger FB.  Same thing on defense, I put my weaker DE on the side with my strongest DT or LB.  I have below average kids at halfback, end, and line on offense and end, line, corners and safeties on defense this year.  If I have a kid at linebacker who brings it in practice but not the game and I have tried repeatedly to fix this, I will move them to motivate them. In some cases, we find out the player should have been at the other position all along.

As for the last comment.  I move players all year long to different positions as needed for a variety of reasons.  If you do it correctly, it can be quite motivating. 


ReplyQuote
PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 12408
 

Hello Coaches,

I have been an assistant coach for some years and now have stepped into a head coach for a 5th & 6th grade team, I still assist the 7th & 8th grade team.  I have a lot of first year players on the 5th & 6th grade team.  We teach crawl, walk, run...we rep it as much as we can and send those that aren't getting the drill with a coach to get trained up, while we keep the rest getting reps.  I would love to get feedback on what other coaches do to get kids to be aggressive against an opponent.  In practice, they are really aggressive with each other, however come game day, I've had kids fight to come off the field vs complaining about not getting playing time.  We get smacked in the mouth.  I can see in the game and especially on film the kids are in position to make the tackle but will slow up, reach, or just slide pass the runner instead of making the tackle.  I really am at a loss of why they are so aggressive in practice with their own teammates but not against an opponent this year.  Any and all feedback is greatly welcomed.

Search out post by Dave Potter. Resident smack you in the mouth installer.  😀 The guy is the real deal when it comes to getting the most from his players.


ReplyQuote
Pearls of Wisdom
(@pearls-of-wisdom)
Platinum
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 4446
 

From an intangible standpoint, it's about things like effort, mental toughness, the ability to stay focused and execute, and be a little relentless in the way you try to go about your work, ... We're gladiators out there. We're modern-day gladiators and that mental toughness has got to permeate your team.

FROM ALABAMA:

Beyond speed and strength, the Crimson Tide are serious about training their minds, too. In fact, mental training is probably what separates them from the rest—the fact that they prepare their minds to deal with the adversity that arises on the field during competition. “Ninety percent of what the athletes deal with is just being in a situation where it is not easy, so we switch things up [in their training] to make it more difficult,” Cochran says. “You can’t be satisfied with what you just did. This next one has to be better. We use this statement a lot when training: ‘You haven’t seen me this good. I am better than I was last group. I am better than I was last rep.’ It is a state of mind.”
Cochran offers an example of how he develops the players’ mental toughness. “You do heavy legs, and then you go try and run. We start off light, and the program builds, so the guys have to become tougher. So when it comes to the game, they are climbing that mountain; and as they go, they get better and better. That is Coach Saban’s whole plan.”
To further develop their mental toughness and increase their capacity to handle adversity in the off-season, Saban makes all his players participate in a character development program twice a week. “Our character development program is basically getting them in the classroom and teaching them how to use their minds, how to talk to themselves,” Cochran says. “Coach Saban wants the guys to learn what to say to themselves when the going gets tough. What are you telling yourself? Are you saying it’s hard? That it’s hot outside? That you’re tired? Or are you saying, ‘I feel great. I am going to dominate this rep; this rep is going to count right here, right now.’”

My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 18418
 

mental training is probably what separates them from the rest—the fact that they prepare their minds to deal with the adversity that arises on the field during competition.

Agree 1000%.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
RoHi
 RoHi
(@rhoibcekrst)
Copper
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

Search out post by Dave Potter. Resident smack you in the mouth installer.  😀 The guy is the real deal when it comes to getting the most from his players.

I definitely will...

"Hook'Em"


ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 2
Share: