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SingleWingGoombah
(@singlewinggoombah)
Gold
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 2070
 

Honestly Brian, I just do the best I can.  That's all I can do.  Whether what I do is of any value to my players or other coaches is for them to decide.  Opinions?  Everybody's got one.  You and I could both have entirely different opinions of the same coach.  Who's right?  As for my conversation with Arnie (Malibu), I was being tongue in cheek.

--Dave

Ok.  I mean I think you are a good coach, to the best of my knowledge.  I don't think a good coach has to have played the sport at all to be a good coach, especially at the youth level. 


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Michael
(@michael)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 12890
 

One thing that sort of relates to all this is when people wonder why, supposedly, people who played professionally at a very high level aren't more successful as coaches.  I think it's become sort of a cliche, and people probably overstate things a bit.

But people tend to attribute it to everything coming easy to the best players, and therefore they don't know how to teach it, and such.  I think that's ridiculous, though.  Like somehow the harder you work the better you become, unless you're really good, in which case it just comes easy.

I think the big difference is that there are so many things to learn about running a team, and dealing with all sorts of issues that come up, that playing professionally doesn't lend itself to.  Someone might play in the NFL until he's 40, but meanwhile a lot of other 40-year-olds have been coaching since they were 21.  Earl Weaver started managing in the minors at 25.  Bill Belichick was working for the Colts when he was 23, and he learned about scouting from his dad long before that.  Jack Lambert, Nick Saban, and Gary Pinkel all played together at Kent State.  In 1974, Lambert won the Super Bowl and Saban and Pinkel were GAs.

And I think a lot of that sort of experience doesn't have to be in the same sport, especially at the lower levels such as youth and maybe high school.  There are a LOT of things you can learn that are very useful when coaching a football team that can be learned while coaching other sports.  There's a lot more going on than just reading the safety.  And I think the issue at higher levels is just that you fall so far behind developments in the sport if you're not in the room or on the field every day.  So you need to learn the non-football-specific lessons while coaching football, because you miss too much new football if you're learning them elsewhere.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
Diamond
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 7683
 

I can state with 99% surety that 100% of the "Good" and Excellent Coaches have developed, earned, or garnered, that reputation under some tutelage and/or similar experience process. They just didn't spend the night at a Holiday Inn Express and come out Genius.

Clinics, Observance, Books, Tape, Presentations are all part of that.  There are also ways to incorporate Business or Battlefield examples as well.

To my thinking, its all out there for reference.  Some of it makes sense to one person but not another and vice versa.  Its not that dissimilar to picking your philosophy you do what suits your personality or abilities.  Then add and subtract from there.  If you pour through enough material, eventually you learn and ultimately realize, nothing is 100% new.  Its Rev2 or Rev10 with material some dropped and some added.  Does Rev1 still work?  If the material has merit it will! 

A Prime example of this was the A11 "Offense".  No one talks about it anymore.  Hell the Single Wing has been around for a Century and is still viable. 

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17794
 

Ok.  I mean I think you are a good coach, to the best of my knowledge.

--Thank you Brian.

I don't think a good coach has to have played the sport at all to be a good coach, especially at the youth level.

--Well Arnie and I were just being sarcastic about it.  No biggie.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 23130
Topic starter  

I have to keep posting on this thread because it keeps me from going on the DW thread and pointing out that I thought the whole point of the DW was having a traffic jam.

LOL !  😀

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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dcooz
(@dcooz)
Bronze
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 142
 

Lol not in the backfield before you get the hand-off 😀


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Dimson
(@dimson)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 7457
 

I can report that all is well on the numbers front with my current Org, which used to be my original AAU org. The only numbers we are low-ish on is 14U but that is the norm for teams in our county. But they aren't in danger of not playing they are just not where they want to be numbers wise.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4423
 

One thing that sort of relates to all this is when people wonder why, supposedly, people who played professionally at a very high level aren't more successful as coaches.  I think it's become sort of a cliche, and people probably overstate things a bit.

But people tend to attribute it to everything coming easy to the best players, and therefore they don't know how to teach it, and such.  I think that's ridiculous, though.  Like somehow the harder you work the better you become, unless you're really good, in which case it just comes easy.

I think the big difference is that there are so many things to learn about running a team, and dealing with all sorts of issues that come up, that playing professionally doesn't lend itself to.  Someone might play in the NFL until he's 40, but meanwhile a lot of other 40-year-olds have been coaching since they were 21.  Earl Weaver started managing in the minors at 25.  Bill Belichick was working for the Colts when he was 23, and he learned about scouting from his dad long before that.  Jack Lambert, Nick Saban, and Gary Pinkel all played together at Kent State.  In 1974, Lambert won the Super Bowl and Saban and Pinkel were GAs.

And I think a lot of that sort of experience doesn't have to be in the same sport, especially at the lower levels such as youth and maybe high school.  There are a LOT of things you can learn that are very useful when coaching a football team that can be learned while coaching other sports.  There's a lot more going on than just reading the safety.  And I think the issue at higher levels is just that you fall so far behind developments in the sport if you're not in the room or on the field every day.  So you need to learn the non-football-specific lessons while coaching football, because you miss too much new football if you're learning them elsewhere.

Multiple paragraphs
No sarcasm
Clearly stated position

Okay, Michael's been hacked.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4423
 

Back to the original point. Had our first practice last night that was actually part of "THE CAMP". I think there were at least two kids who played last season (perhaps as 1st graders). Both are now with us because the club they played for last season isn't fielding a 2nd grade team. That's alarming and heavily supports Cisar's position. With the fear surrounding the game, the margin of error has all but vanished. You get one chance to win over the parents. If you fail, enough walk away that you no longer have a team.

I don't know the full story, though. Our league had a "rookie" division, 1st graders I believe. From what I heard, it was a bit of a shit show with only 2 or 3 games getting played. Haven't spoken to these kids' parents to see what they thought of their experience last season. For now, I'm officially "banned" from talking to parents.  😛

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachBrian
(@coachbrian)
Gold
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 1052
 

13u numbers are down in my area this year.  They've been down each year for the last three years.  Other ages levels are about the same, except that we are down one team in the 9u.


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
Gold
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 1670
 

Look, if they’re a working stiff, administrator, great coach, and still a good father & husband, give me their phone numbers so I can worship at their feet.

The successful ORGS in our area are usually run by retired/semi retired guys.

I’m married with a one month old son at home, full-time corporate finance manager and currently launching my own CPA practice. I am not our org head but assume much of that responsibility. One AC actually thought I was President for a full year lol. I am also the 14U HC and have been to the last 3 championships despite our 12U going 0-24 over that span. So we’ve been pretty successful.

Our President is HC of the 12U so as you can imagine, if I left these things to him, we’d be in rough shape. I don’t care for the title or “credit” so I’m fine with getting sh*t done behind the scenes. I manage but it is A LOT.

One change this year with the newborn is my approach to delegation. In the past I would delegate but when others dropped the ball (and in my org like many that is a regular occurrence), I’d swoop in and get it done. Unfortunately some take advantage / see that as a green light to drop the ball.

This year, while I am willing to help, I am refusing to pick up slack for grown men. So if Coach X agreed he would be responsible for setting up scrimmages and drops the ball, he can explain to the players why we don’t have scrimmages (where in the past I’d fix it in the 11th hour). Just one example but you get the idea - no more bailouts!

We’ll see how that goes but it is doable esp if you have competent people willing and able to help with all the behind the scenes stuff that goes into running a successful org. Most just don’t grasp what it really takes esp if the program is new or has historically struggled as a whole.

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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COACH JC
(@winged)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 6999
 

I’m married with a one month old son at home, full-time corporate finance manager and currently launching my own CPA practice. I am not our org head but assume much of that responsibility. One AC actually thought I was President for a full year lol. I am also the 14U HC and have been to the last 3 championships despite our 12U going 0-24 over that span. So we’ve been pretty successful.

Our President is HC of the 12U so as you can imagine, if I left these things to him, we’d be in rough shape. I don’t care for the title or “credit” so I’m fine with getting sh*t done behind the scenes. I manage but it is A LOT.

One change this year with the newborn is my approach to delegation. In the past I would delegate but when others dropped the ball (and in my org like many that is a regular occurrence), I’d swoop in and get it done. Unfortunately some take advantage / see that as a green light to drop the ball.

This year, while I am willing to help, I am refusing to pick up slack for grown men. So if Coach X agreed he would be responsible for setting up scrimmages and drops the ball, he can explain to the players why we don’t have scrimmages (where in the past I’d fix it in the 11th hour). Just one example but you get the idea - no more bailouts!

We’ll see how that goes but it is doable esp if you have competent people willing and able to help with all the behind the scenes stuff that goes into running a successful org. Most just don’t grasp what it really takes esp if the program is new or has historically struggled as a whole.

Props to you sir! Well done. It is kinda funny tho, the President is the one w/ the horrible team. Which is basically my point. And while i’m sure you do a lot of it, like I do, the guy carrying the title almost alway carries the much heavier burden.

You’re basically a lot like me (except I have 4 kids at home). You can be a great father/husband. Great coach & make sure your team is legit. Help out w/ the league. But you can’t get the rest of the league where it needs to be. I think that’s about the best you can hope for. I’m sure there’s one or two exceptions to the rule, but not many.

In my area, where football is dying fast. I think your Pres has to be a non coach that devotes all their football related energy to the league. They need to be a marketing guy w/ a decent amount of spare time/flexibility on their hands.

Like, if I put the same hours into running a league that I do into coaching, and had the same level of love for administrating as I do for coaching. There’s no doubt in my mind we’d be a bad ass ORG. full top to bottom. But I also know there’s no way in hell I could be a great coach, administrator, and a good family man & employee.

It's all about having fun.  But losing aint fun!


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
Gold
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 1670
 

Our 12U spent the first half hour of practice yesterday running our President's favorite "drill" where every kid on the team is in one line taking turns running Post or Corner routes with him (our President) throwing to them.

They were clocking about 2-3 reps a minute so with 15 kids in attendance, each kid gets a rep every 5 mins at best. The other "coaches" are policing the lines telling the kids to shut up and pay attention.

I'm having trouble providing a description that adequately portrays how horrendous it was. Picture backup tackles running corner routes looking over the wrong shoulder with a heavy set guy in his 50s throwing ducks to them with zero instruction.

Sent a video to Joe of 1 min of it - his response "WTF? No wonder they never win." So in fairness I wouldn't chalk it all up to him being so busy with admin duties  😛

Kid walked by before practice - looked like an athletic 14 year old. I speak w him and his parents, turns out he's 11!

Introduce him to their AHC (also a board member), first thing he tells the kid "well we ain't lookin too spectacular this year."  At least he's honest? Shocking that my efforts to help them recruit seem wasted.

Again point being - while I get what you're saying, their lack of success is def not driven by being too busy with admin duties. I put in more time than either of them. They're good guys just not good coaches - wouldn't win if they were 100% retired and had zero admin responsibilities.

I'm sure there are other instances that support your assertion - this just ain't one lol.

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
Gold
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 1670
 

And props to you on managing four! I already told my wife two is my absolute cap.

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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MHcoach
(@mhcoach)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 7637
 

GP

I haven't seen bad passing lines since the 70's. This was even worse than those were, at least back then they would run 2 lines with the coach throwing.

This is all about him & his ego. He has no concept of what it takes to be good.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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