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A Johns Hopkins Study Reveals the Scientific Secret to Double How Fast You Learn  

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Prodigy
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November 18, 2020 8:32 am  

Here's the article:

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/a-johns-hopkins-study-reveals-the-scientific-secret-to-double-how-fast-you-learn?utm_source=pocket-newtab

The cliffnotes is:
Practicing helps to improve your skills with anything.  If you practice the same way every single time (i.e. playing scales on an instrument) without any variance, you can actually get worse.  The key to improving the skill is to add variance (i.e. play scale forward and backward, add trills or flair, play faster or slower).

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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CoachDP
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November 18, 2020 10:35 am  
Posted by: @prodigy

If you practice the same way every single time (i.e. playing scales on an instrument) without any variance, you can actually get worse.  The key to improving the skill is to add variance (i.e. play scale forward and backward, add trills or flair, play faster or slower).

Which is how you keep your practices from going flat (i.e., variance).  Problem is, many believe that variance is practicing hard one day, and going light on another.  Grinding on one day, and having water balloon fights on another.  What I'm advocating is how many different approaches you can use to teaching a particular fundamental(?)

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Prodigy
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November 18, 2020 11:47 am  

@coachdp there's a very popular method of training in powerlifting circles called "the conjugate method" and part of it is a maximum effort day where you do an exercise that's LIKE a bench press or LIKE a squat or deadlift but is not.  For example, on a bench press maximum effort day you might do: inclines, declines, floor presses, board presses, pin presses.  The thought behind this was that you can lift at 90% intensity or higher 52 weeks a year without regressing.  Louie Simmons, the man most often credited with taking the idea from Eastern Bloc olympic weightlifters, always said that if you are training at 90% intensity or higher for more than about 6 weeks with a particular movement, you would regress.  Part of the way around this is by rotating special exercises (incline, decline, overhead press, floor press, board press) every couple of weeks, always trying to beat your previous best.  The second way around this is to build explosive strength by lifting approximately 50% of your maximum but trying to exert 100% force on it -- confusing to a lot of people but if you have a bar with 100 pounds on it, how much force does it take to move it?  Most people will say 100 lbs. but 100 lbs. vs. 100 lbs. = no movement.  If a lifter exerts at least 101 lbs. of force on a 100 lbs. barbell it will move...slowly, but it will move.  This proves that when you lift X weight you're actually exerting more force than is actually on the bar.

Anyhow...little variances in training apparently help people to learn quicker and also when we're talking about lifting weights and building strength, to get stronger. 

 

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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