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TigerMOJO
(@infccoach)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 524
Topic starter  

I dont know much about baseball honestly. But I do help on my sons team at times basically cuz their all my football boys also.

Question:
How do you pick the catcher in order of athletic ability? Say you have 11 players...should your primary catcher be in top or bottom half of the 11 in athletic ability? What do you look for in a catcher?

When I say athletic ability I'm  talking about throwing amd catching for the most part. I ask cuz the HC son is the catcher and prolly is #9 on catching and throwing. I had to break him of his "trying" to daddyball his son on my football team. And this has nothing to do with my son...he doesn't want to play catcher at all and has his spots on the team. Just curious how someone picks their catcher cuz our backup catcher is better and there is another kid which is a top 4 on the team that wants to catch but hasn't had a chance yet.

Pain is Temporary...Pride is Forever!

A Champion will do what a loser won't do to succeed!!

Who Am I?


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Steve
(@steve)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 122
 

I dont know much about baseball honestly. But I do help on my sons team at times basically cuz their all my football boys also.

Question:
How do you pick the catcher in order of athletic ability? Say you have 11 players...should your primary catcher be in top or bottom half of the 11 in athletic ability? What do you look for in a catcher?

When I say athletic ability I'm  talking about throwing amd catching for the most part. I ask cuz the HC son is the catcher and prolly is #9 on catching and throwing. I had to break him of his "trying" to daddyball his son on my football team. And this has nothing to do with my son...he doesn't want to play catcher at all and has his spots on the team. Just curious how someone picks their catcher cuz our backup catcher is better and there is another kid which is a top 4 on the team that wants to catch but hasn't had a chance yet.

If your playing house ball who cares.
If your doing travel ball he should be your smartest best athlete.


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CoachCalande
(@www-coachcalande-com)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7059
 

I dont know much about baseball honestly. But I do help on my sons team at times basically cuz their all my football boys also.

Question:
How do you pick the catcher in order of athletic ability? Say you have 11 players...should your primary catcher be in top or bottom half of the 11 in athletic ability? What do you look for in a catcher?

When I say athletic ability I'm  talking about throwing amd catching for the most part. I ask cuz the HC son is the catcher and prolly is #9 on catching and throwing. I had to break him of his "trying" to daddyball his son on my football team. And this has nothing to do with my son...he doesn't want to play catcher at all and has his spots on the team. Just curious how someone picks their catcher cuz our backup catcher is better and there is another kid which is a top 4 on the team that wants to catch but hasn't had a chance yet.

you need a catcher that will block the ball, has enough quickness to shed his mask and make a catch and most of all, hes got to throw accurately to second base.

MOJO    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtcRmKnRcsA

Go to WWW.COACHCALANDE.COM  for Double Wing DVDs, Playbook, Drills Manuals, Practice footage and emagazines. Ask me about our new 38 special dvds!


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patriotsfatboy1
(@patriotsfatboy1)
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Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 3260
 

Not sure what age you are talking about, but catcher is very important. Our best 3 players typically rotate between P, SS and C.

You need to have a good defensive catcher or teams will run all over you.


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Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
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Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 7683
 

I played the Position for years.  Not saying I was great but in youth ball you need a kid who is a WALL to keep walks from being like a triple in 2 pitches!  Nothing hurts a team more than a kid who chases every other ball to the back stop.  That being said everything can be taught!  One the hardest things to overcome is the tendency to turn their head when the bat comes through.  Just like hitting focus on the ball and don't anticipate the swing!  The second thing a Catcher must lear is where to put is throwing hand!  NEVER leave it dangle.  I was most comfortable with grabbing the Thigh with my thumb In the Crease made by the squat.  I also used tucking my finger tips in my belt behind my back.  There is always the two handed catch placing the throwing hand on top of your glove.  This is the quickest release of all. 

Having watched numerous little league games the 2 things that stick out in my mind is the ability to stop the ball and the presentation of a decent target!  Even after I played Baseball I was a Catcher in Softball.  I had more people get mad at me for Talking to the batter and the umpire. 

Here comes a FAT PITCH don't miss it!  I think you missed that one Blue as I threw it back. 

I swear a decent catcher will save 3 or 4 runs per game at the youth level.    😉

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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COACH JC
(@winged)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 6999
 

Well, 2 years ago our star RB/QB, was also the catcher of the All American 13u baseball team. He was the fastest best athlete on the team, and could throw a football 50 yards on a dime.

Some of it depends on age. But i think on most youth baseball fields, you'll find the best athletes at SS, P, C, & CF. Probably in that order.

It's all about having fun.  But losing aint fun!


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J. Potter (seabass)
(@seabass)
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Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1262
 

Intelligence and savvy can make up for a lack of athleticism at catcher. Our catcher plays qb on his football team. Our starting ss plays qb on his football team. Our #1 pitcher plays qb on his team as well. The 3 of them rotate between those 3 spots when one or the other is on the mound. Seeing a theme?


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DREagle
(@coyouthcoach)
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Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 897
 

If you are playing all out baseball then you better have a solid catcher or every single will be a triple and every kid in third will score on a passed ball. He needs a solid glove, a big arm and one of your better heads for the game. Leg speed not a big deal but he has to be able to move to stop balls and to get to the ball and make a play when there's a player on third and the pitch is in the dirt and off of the backstop.


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TigerMOJO
(@infccoach)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 524
Topic starter  

Thanks I was thinking that would be the case also.

We are 9u travel A team. 1st yr in kid pitch. Last yr was first yr together. Coach is a pretty good coach!! He's does know baseball amd been coaching for a few yrs. I would do some things a lil different "mostly cuz my 3yrs on thia site" 😉 but he knows the game. Just was wondering that.

LOVE THE KID THOUGH!!! been coaching him 4 yrs now in something..best balanced kid I've ever seen...i installed a jet wedge series offense and he was my wedge back. Avergae speed but hard to bring down in a crowd lol. It's just he's about .500 at stopping balls in practice and cant make 2nd base throw all the way and not very quick.

We've also coached together for 4 yrs. Good guy just overly favors his son at times last couple yrs. But i just thought I'd ask.

Pain is Temporary...Pride is Forever!

A Champion will do what a loser won't do to succeed!!

Who Am I?


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PioneerCoach
(@pioneercoach)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 321
 

We're talking about 9u so:

The spring and summer seasons are long.  At 9u, you have re-entry, there's no reason to anoint one player as "the catcher".  Trust me, the catchers can rotate through every couple innings, play one infield position and one outfield position without hurting the team.  Remember, you're job is to help the kids learn to play the game.  Don't be in a hurry to win it all, they don't need to be a finished product at 9 years old.    I'm guessing you will likely be following this group as they age.  If you think of it as a four-year project, it will pay off by the time you get to 12u, which is the peak year for LL and Cal Ripken.

The first criteria is " Does the kid actually WANT to play catcher".  He has to want to continue blocking balls in the dirt and chasing wild pitches back to the screen when the temps get above 90 and the humidity becomes unbearable.  I coached town travel baseball from 8u-12u and was blessed with several kids who loved it.  I  actually had to force them to play other positions at times just to give them a break, but I've seen other teams who had to force kids to put the gear on because no one wanted any part of it.

The second criteria is "Can he actually catch".  At 9u there will be enough wild pitches that the runners will advance seemingly at will.  You don't need passed balls helping them out as well.  If the pitcher throws a catchable ball, the catcher needs to catch it every time.

Don't worry about throwing runners out at 2B.  It's not going to happen yet (smart coaches just wait for a wild pitch, they come frequently enough).  You might be able to pick off a baserunner at 1B or 3B who's not paying attention, but that's about it.

Biggest piece of advice is to keep defensive stats (passed balls, fielding errors, throwing errors, mental errors) for all positions.  Every team keeps offensive stats, but very few keep defensive stats at this level.  That's where you can help your team improve the most.  It's also helpful when you have to defend your decisions to the parent agents...parent agents hate stats.  I have had several situations over the years where a few key stats would have saved me a lot of headache.

Good luck and enjoy the ride.

-Craig

"February: I want to run triple option from the single wing, but with a pass option, too. Should the end run a post or a corner?
September: Any advice on how to get my center to snap it properly?"


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Shamrocks
(@shamrocks)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2354
 

Need a catcher who can actually catch and keep the ball in front of him.  At that age, if you have a catcher who cannot keep the ball in front of him, a single or a walk means that runner will be on 3rd in 2 pitches pretty much.

I also want a catcher who can accurately get the ball to 2nd and 3rd and it doesn't even have to be a perfect line-drive throw, instead, I will take a few hard bounces that are on the money then a lollipop that is in the 2nd baseman's mitt a few seconds after the runner slides into second safely.  It also helps that the kid actually wants to be a catcher as well.


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paccoach
(@paccoach)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 173
 

I've coached travel baseball for years.  I won't go on a tangent so I keep it short.  It depends on the rule set how important catcher is.  Once you can lead off and steal, the catcher can and will be a game changer. 

Your best players should be your catchers.  You have to be careful because usually your best players pitch too but that's where a good rotation comes into play. Nothing worse than a walk turning into a triple.  Again, put your best players at catcher.


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Malibu
(@idaho-coach)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 877
 

It depends.  First, there are 9 year olds that can throw kids out at 2nd.  No question.  The short answer is that ideally you develop a catcher (or 2) over time that isn't necessarily your best athlete, but can become a good catcher.  That allows your best athletes (who are usually your best pitchers, ss, cf, etc.) to play other positions and not use up their arm and stamina (especially playing 3 games a day in 100 deg heat).  We rotated our top 3 guys thru pitcher and catcher when they were younger (which was tough and maybe a mistake) on one of our teams.  When they were 12, we made it to the CR World Series because a less "athletic" kid became a very good catcher (through hard work) and our best pitchers were freed up to play other positions and conserve their energy/arms.  He was a defensive liability in the field before he became a good catcher, but could swing it.  I don't think we make it there if he didn't become a good catcher and we had to put together the puzzle differently.


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TigerMOJO
(@infccoach)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 524
Topic starter  

It depends.  First, there are 9 year olds that can throw kids out at 2nd.  No question.  The short answer is that ideally you develop a catcher (or 2) over time that isn't necessarily your best athlete, but can become a good catcher.  That allows your best athletes (who are usually your best pitchers, ss, cf, etc.) to play other positions and not use up their arm and stamina (especially playing 3 games a day in 100 deg heat).  We rotated our top 3 guys thru pitcher and catcher when they were younger (which was tough and maybe a mistake) on one of our teams.  When they were 12, we made it to the CR World Series because a less "athletic" kid became a very good catcher (through hard work) and our best pitchers were freed up to play other positions and conserve their energy/arms.  He was a defensive liability in the field before he became a good catcher, but could swing it.  I don't think we make it there if he didn't become a good catcher and we had to put together the puzzle differently.

This right here may be he's thinking. Just like I demand that my coaches trust me during football I want to do the same. Just dont know much about coaching the game. So this makes since to me cuz our top athletes play those positions primarily pitchers, ss, cf. And he's plan its to build this team for the future so this makes since to me.

Pain is Temporary...Pride is Forever!

A Champion will do what a loser won't do to succeed!!

Who Am I?


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CoachDoc
(@collin)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 340
 

Daddy ball catching is the worst thing IMO.  Nothing is more annoying than a kid who can't catch playing catcher, and everybody knowing it is because of Daddy ball.  To protect myself from this, I have catcher tryouts, and use hard numbers to make the decision of who will be my catcher, which can include up to four kids.  Throw them a bunch of pitches, some good and some not, and keep track of the numbers of the different types they catch (for good) or stop (for bad).  For instance, 5/5 catching 'good' pitches and 3/5 stopping 'bad' pitches.  If the pitches are really bad, I don't count them either way.  Then have them do 5 throws (3 to 2nd and 2 to 3rd), keeping track of their POP time (look up catcher POP time) and the accuracy.  If there are tryouts, then only people who want to do it will do it.  It is always obvious who your best 2-4 kids are.  You NEED at least 2, but I'd suggest at least 3.  Maybe have a kid who wants to develop as a catcher as 3 (coach's son), giving him time in practice and/or a few games. 


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