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CoachDavidP
(@fizzlife)
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Joined: 9 years ago
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Reserve time at a cage and divide the cost between each player. Any team I've helped on and any team my sons or daughter has been on does this. Parents never complain as long as their kid gets time in the cage.

And I forgot an important part about what I said about running if you drop the ball in warm ups. Turn it into a competition. The last duo that doesn't drop it are the winners. Get the coaches throwing too. But even when I did it, I never won, but did run. Lol

David (Fizzlife)Extreme Ownership -- Jocko Willink and Leif Babin


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davecisar
(@davecisar)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7679
 

This is off tangent a bit

One of my combination drills/games:

Line up all your kids from home to the outfield fence along the first base line in equal distance apart from each other. Have about 4 kids "on deck"
The batters hit from a T- soft or short toss

A ball is held by the player at the fence. Once the ball is hit, the kid with the ball at the fence throws the ball to the next player in line- he throws it to the next, so on and so forth until the ball gets home.

The "batter" runs all the bases and tries to make it home before the ball makes it to the plate or second base- etc- you set the distance so that it is a close call.
Once a player has had his turn he goes to the last spot on the fence- everyone moves up a spot so everyone gets a turn.
Teaches: catching quick ball transfer, teamwork, baserunning.

YOu can divide into teams and do the 3 outs thing as well if you have larger teams
Our kids loved it

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


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CoachDavidP
(@fizzlife)
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That's a nice sounding drill/game Dave.

Another thing we did to close practice. Lined up the team on the baseline in the outfield. In a stance as if they were standing on first. A coach simulating a pitcher across from them.  Coach either steps as if delivering the ball to the plate or simulates a pick off move or just "steps off". The team sprints to roughly 2nd base area on any simulated pitch. A second coach/dad on the other side for the return sprint. Have a good practice, maybe only run 3 or 4 times. But normally run a few more than that (especially if you don't see 100% effort on the sprints) Really taught them to recognize the pick off moves to improve base stealing.

David (Fizzlife)Extreme Ownership -- Jocko Willink and Leif Babin


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Malibu
(@idaho-coach)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 877
 

Reserve time at a cage and divide the cost between each player. Any team I've helped on and any team my sons or daughter has been on does this. Parents never complain as long as their kid gets time in the cage.

And I forgot an important part about what I said about running if you drop the ball in warm ups. Turn it into a competition. The last duo that doesn't drop it are the winners. Get the coaches throwing too. But even when I did it, I never won, but did run. Lol

Agree with the cage time.  You can get more done in one day hitting in three chutes than in 3 days on one field.  As far as warmups, I respectfully disagree.  I don't want my kids acting like it is water balloon toss to not get knocked out.  I want them pushing themselves, which leads to mistakes, which leads to them getting better.  Just my 2 cents.


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CoachDavidP
(@fizzlife)
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Joined: 9 years ago
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Agree with the cage time.  You can get more done in one day hitting in three chutes than in 3 days on one field.  As far as warmups, I respectfully disagree.  I don't want my kids acting like it is water balloon toss to not get knocked out.  I want them pushing themselves, which leads to mistakes, which leads to them getting better.  Just my 2 cents.

In my two seasons with these guys (they all coached together for seven years, not sure how long they used this) no kids were ever afraid of running. And they were encouraged to push themselves. If they didn't start expanding their range, they were instructed to. They all enjoyed the challenge and they all really improved quickly. And the effort to catch a throw that wasn't right on target was above and beyond. Maybe not for everyone. Perhaps it's the environment they created and how they instituted it.  They didn't start it the first week but they got it going pretty early and the benefits did show. These were 13 and 14 year olds most with at least 2 years experience, some with much more. Could be it also. I definitely wouldn't do it with 8's.

David (Fizzlife)Extreme Ownership -- Jocko Willink and Leif Babin


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cbrm
 cbrm
(@cbrm)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 591
 

I might have to head coach rec league baseball this year. Ages 11-12, very non select team of 10 or 11 kids. I have helped coach but never been head man.

Looking for ideas for fast paced practices for an hour or a little more. Ideas?  Stations?

Thanks

Coach,

When you say very non-select team, I am almost certain you will have an extremely broad range of interest level across your players.  After 7 years of coaching Little League from ages 6-12, I have always found this to be true (even with regular-season major teams).  IMO there are several non-technical things to integrate (and avoid) in building your program.

Design practices where kids are engaged and performing a baseball movement or activity a maximum amount of time.

Avoid team batting practices with everyone standing in the field for two hours while someone "learns" how to make contact (teach this safely off to the side with wiffle balls while the field is used for other activities).  When you must do a batting practice, consider rotating fielders with each batter (9-8-7-5-6-4-3-tee work/soft toss, at bat, back to the field).

Yes, small-group drills and high rep rates are very important.  However. do not discount the importance of situation baseball, so kids will know what to do when the spotlight is on them (most notably defense and baserunning).

Self confidence is PARAMOUNT in baseball, because so much of it is individual (build player confidence in any way possible).

Be enthusiastic and fast paced... do not allow the kids to become bored.

Create competitive contests with winners and losers (indian ball, 5 on 5 coach pitch with batters starting with one or two strikes already on them)

They must be pressured to perform with intensity and "in the moment"; Think of diverse ways to challenge them, and as a coach you must create this environment.

You know... it's much the same as what coaches should do in any sport.

Vince Lombardi was also a successful high school basketball coach (105-57), but I don't think it was due to his technical knowledge of the game.
http://www.bergen.com/photo-galleries/vince-lombardi-remembering-a-beloved-sports-legend-1.773587

Good luck,
Brian

Do right by Him, and you'll do right by them.


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Pearls of Wisdom
(@pearls-of-wisdom)
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Joined: 7 years ago
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Batting Fundamentals

by Ty Cobb (1938)  Lifetime Batting Average = .366 (highest of All-Time):

Batting Tip:

1
DON'T GRIP YOUR BAT AT THE VERY END; leave say an inch or two. ALSO, LEAVE AT LEAST AN INCH OR MOE SPACE BETWEEN YOUR HANDS; that gives you balance and control of bat, and also keeps hands from interfering with each other during swing.

2
Take position at plate, especially against right hand pitchers, BACK OF PLATE, and against a man with a real curve, YOU CAN STAY ON BACK LINE OF BATTING BOX. Now try to hit to right-center. I don't mean you should place the ball in any one spot, but start now practicing to hit your righthanders to the opposite field. An inside ball from a right-hand pitcher you will naturally pull, say, to left-center.

3
DON'T SLUG AT FULL SPEED; LEARN TO MEET THEM FIRMLY, and you will be surprised at the results.

4
Now, to hit as I ask, to right-center or center. YOU STAND AWAY FROM PLATE the distance you can see with mind's eye that you can hit the ball that curves on inside corner, to center. This distance away from the plate will allow you to hit the outside ball to right. In other words, you protect the plate both on inside pitches and outside.

5
Remember, THE PLATE IS THE PITCHER'S OBJECTIVE AND HE HAS TO COME TO IT. I use 'back of plate' expression to mean towards the catcher, away from plate to denote distance from plate towards outside of box. Now, USE A SLIGHTLY CLOSED STANCE, AND KEEP A LITTLE MORE WEIGHT ON YOUR FRONT FOOT THAN BACK. That gives you balance and won't pull you away from curves. You are always in position to give maximum drive.

6
DON'T PULL A CURVE BALL FROM A RIGHTHANDER. The ball is revolving away from you. He with the revolution and to right-field.

7
KEEP YOUR LEFT ELBOW COCKED ON LEVEL WITH YOUR HANDS OR EVEN HIGHER. Never let the elbows down below the hands, and keep your hands always well away from the body - keep pushing them out, even with your body or back.

8
KEEP YOUR BACK LEG STRAIGHT. Of course, if you put your weight more on the front leg, then the back leg will be straight.

9
IF HIGH FAST BALLS INSIDE REALLY BOTHER YOU: crouch over from waist and pass them up. Don't bite, in other words. In crouching, you make the pitcher throw lower, which forces him away from the position that bothers you. But I think with the instructions I have given, you will hit them wherever they pitch.

10
AGAINST A SPEEDY LEFT-HANDER DON'T PULL. Use same stance I have given you, and when he throws you his curve, knock him down with it or you will naturally pull it, as the ball is breaking in to you. BUT AGAINST A LEFT-HANDER OF FAIR SPEED: Move up in the box, also closer to the plate, and PULL THIS STYLE OF PITCHING.

Batting Fundamentals by Ty Cobb

My Contact Info: Coach Bill Mountjoy phone: 804-716-7038 EST /  Email: butzadams@hotmail.com


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davecisar
(@davecisar)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7679
 

My son will be playing for this guys dad this season:
https://www.perfectgame.org/players/playerprofile.aspx?ID=292615
Jakson Reetz is local kid-who is top 100 MLB draft this year right out of HS
He led state in batting as a Frosh and was hitting at .600 clip last I looked
The dad coached him all the way through HS
Guy knows his stuff- is now coaching his 4th son through Little LEague- understands little guys baseball
Kid was on US National team last 2 years
Im all ears

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


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justaparent
(@justaparent)
Copper
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9
 

My 2 cents, for 10 year old rec league.

Find other dads that can coach or at least mimic what you are doing or saying.  We had 4 coaches, divide and conquer, hitting, fielding, pitching and base running.  Every coach had a practice, position and game responsibility.

Focus on putting the ball in play and throwing strikes, if you can't do that the rest doesn't matter.

Hitting - set up as many stations as you have coaches and facilities.  The leftovers rotate in/out of fielding or pitching stations.  Our max stations were 4, pitching machine, coach pitching, coach pitching - sitituational hitting & short quick toss.  Keys - quick swing, not a lot of head movement, loading.  Best thing - send your son to a good batting coach...take notes and ask "why" questions, then pass on what you learn to team.

Fielding - Best player is your catcher, lefty or righty. Pass balls and steals will eat you up at this age.  Get everybody an infield and an outfield position.  Drills - #1 put your infielders in the infield at their positions, hit them balls in rapid successions around the horn.  Have them field it and then toss it behind them, no throws.  By the time 3B has fielded, toss the ball and is ready you should have hit it to the 1B.  Give them quick feed back every time.  When you are done have them quickly gather their balls and put them in your bucket.  Focus on glove hand, back hand, right at them and unknown.  Hit to them at their level, bullets to studs and a little gentler to the others.  Killing them with the ball does nothing. #2 put infielders + catcher in infield (this can be done is a pasture or parking lot), throw it to one of them, when the ball is 1/2 way there yell where you want them to throw it next, keep repeating.  10 quick push ups for thrower and catcher who mess up, if they don't mess up 10 push ups for coach.  This gives them confidence in quickly making hard throws on command.  #3  one infield & two coaches.  Coach A hits to SS who goes to 2nd & Coach B hits to 3rd who throws to first.  Switch as needed.  #4  - #??? find or make up drills for double play (not very important), pass ball P covering home, C throw to 2B, P covering 1st on grounder to right side, 1st & 3rd plays, run downs.  #9 Hit the ball to the outfielders - catch it or field it correctly, back up the next guy, & throw to bag or cutoff.  Find out who can catch on the dead run and who can't catch at all. *Coach them to always backup every play, don't let them sleep, give them feed back when they do it right or fall asleep.

Pitching - keep it simple 4 seamer then 2 seamer then change up & then stop.  Read the Dr Andrews pitching rules and follow them, don't be that guy.  Most important thing is throwing strikes, you can't defend a walk.

Baserunning - practice it with coaches at 1st and 3rd.  Running home through 1st, home & turn, home to 2nd, home to 3rd, 1st to 2nd (slide), 1st to 2nd turn & 1st to 3rd.  Discuss and practice - 1/2 way on a fly ball (RF is different from LF), sliding, runner on 2nd two outs, coming off the bag the instant the ball crosses the plate or when ever you can leave the bag.  Practice them listening to the base coaches.  They have to run.

Misc. 
*Run on and off the field, 3/4 speed at all times during practice when not doing a drill. 
*5 vs 5 drill - coach pitching (base running coaches too)  with 5 infielders & 5 hitters.  They hit until 3 outs, then switch and keep score.  Do this at a rapid pace, it's fun, works on fielding and hitting situations, hitters aren't watching a walk fest.  Do it fast, as soon as the play is over the next batter should be standing in the box ready to hit.
*Most players will have 2-5 opportunites to make a play in the field during a game, we don't know which pitch out of 100 it will be.  Always give them feed back when a little thing pays off or doesn't (running to 1b after a walk, LF backing up a throw to 3rd, RF backing up 1B ect)
*We had a quick huddle before they sprinted to take the field every inning, let a different kid say "motto", quick way to refocus, give them the situation and let your least best player say "team" after he got a hit , did something and be recognized.
*Write out your lineup before each game based on who is pitching and what the score is.  Close game late and stud P #2 goes in vs.  you are way up stud P #6 goes in and the outfielders take the infield. 
*Have a public system for your batting order and keep stats.  If a parent asks you why Johnny is batting last "Well Mrs. Jeter based on your players OBP, BA and base running times he fits solidly in our #12 hole.
*Get at least two 5 gallon buckets of balls.
*Every player wears a cup at all practices and games.
*Make frieds with the umps, the same ones will be there all year and next year.
*If you've read Mike Leachs book, don't do what he did, at 10 years old it isn't about winning.  It is about getting better and not pissing off everybody else in your community.  Don't be the guy who thinks nobody knows his neat little tricks, slow play, bad hitters standing on the plate taking 2 strikes, ect


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