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Building an inexperienced team


olderdog
(@olderdog)
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I am head coach of a 9U team this year that has very little experience. The team last year played in the championship (lost), but I took over this year after the coach moved up a division and there are only three returning players from last year’s team. Over half my players played their first tackle football game this past Saturday.

I have so much to teach these new players, I’m having to start at the basics of blocking and tackling. While other coaches were installing offense the first three weeks, I was teaching lineman to take their first two steps, principles of leverage, and wide base on board drills. On defense, We spent most of our time desensitizing them to contact with splatter tackling, form fit, on up to tee time. They actually tackle pretty well at this point in drills, but when they get lined up, they forget everything they were taught.  On the field they are confused and timid.  As a result, I installed the basic plays and defensive scheme later than I would like, focusing on building fundamentals. 

At our first game, we played a team we could have beaten. We were not physically overmatched, we moved the ball ok, but stalled at key points with mistakes and missed assignments. Our defense was really good at points, but again, key missed tackles (bad angles) led to a few cheap touchdowns. Bottom line, we had kids who were confused about their roles and made mistakes. Lost 22-0.  

If they’re confused, they aren’t aggressive. If they aren’t aggressive they play timid. They were confused due to lack of reps. In the end, that’s my fault  in preparing them.

Tonight at practice we backed it all up and ran defensive units and reviewed/drilled assignments for 90 minutes in detail. Every player got specific attention, every question was answered that was asked. Then we spent 30 minutes running the same offensive play repeatedly until blockers understood their assignments and the back could hit the hole. That’s as far as I got. 

I feel like it was a good practice, but it was a grind. The pace is slow. There really are bright spots, but we are raw. My question is, can I afford to keep this slow pace? Can I afford not to? If they can’t run our base play with confidence, how can I move on?  Am I right to gut this out and continue grinding and teaching until the light bulbs pop? Will patience on my part pay the biggest dividend for them and for the team, even if they can only run three plays effectively next week? 


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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IMHO, stay the course. You can't build a house without a solid foundation. Not many coaches are where they want to be at this point in the season.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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terrypjohnson
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I hear you, Coach! I'm in the same boat -- only the team I inherited went winless. We're only two weeks in and I feel like we're miles behind. All we can continue to do is teach the basics. Eventually, the rest of it will click.

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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Coyote
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Posted by: @olderdog

If they can’t run our base play with confidence, how can I move on?  

Better to run 3 plays well, than 20 plays sloppy.  Gumby is correct, not many of us are where we'd like to be at this point. 

Some plays we installed 2 weeks ago, we have yet to run due to kids not being confident in them.   We've more than the usual number of kids who are still asking what to do on some plays come game time, in practice, no problem, in the game - blank stares.   The learning curve is on their abilities, not ours.  Its their light bulb, not ours. 

From my side of the computer screen, it seems you're on the right track. 

Good luck

This post was modified 4 weeks ago by Coyote

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
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Posted by: @olderdog

I feel like it was a good practice, but it was a grind. The pace is slow. There really are bright spots, but we are raw. My question is, can I afford to keep this slow pace? Can I afford not to? If they can’t run our base play with confidence, how can I move on?  Am I right to gut this out and continue grinding and teaching until the light bulbs pop? Will patience on my part pay the biggest dividend for them and for the team, even if they can only run three plays effectively next week? 

Welcome to football.

I'm in a similar position this year, but as AC and with much older players but a "younger team".  On our roster of 19, 8th grade and under, about a third are carryovers (including one coach's son whom I've coached since 2017) while the rest have never played football, and a few have very little idea of the game.

I think you're mostly doing the right thing, but I differ in that on offense I would walk thru more plays, to give them an idea of why they're practicing the offensive fundamentals they do.  They need to see the big picture, even if few plays are actually installed yet.  Do it slowly, with the role of each position explained (demonstrated if you've got the bodies for it).

You'll also discover the 20% of drills that contribute 80% of their competitiveness at their stage.  Pursuit angles is one of the toughest things to learn, but also the most fun if you do it right, as well as paying off big on the scoreboard.  IMO doing it right means a drill where you mix in different players trying to cut one off running down a sideline.  Let them learn angles to take when they're faster, slower, or equally fast as the runner they're trying to cut off.  Do it "touch" fashion at first if you want to minimize contact, but at some point go "live".  Remember that although the players are running a long way into the hit, it's not coming anywhere close to head-on; also a runner's being forced out of bounds is as good as a tackle.

There's also a drill our team uses that I consider doing it wrong, though it's better than nothing.  We do it because the high school does it and it looks cool.  The defense lines up in their positions and stances at the snap, and on "go" each runs to a cone on the sideline.  Each position has its own cone to run to.  The idea is that you have the whole sideline covered, but do you see the disadvantage here?  It may be fine for interscholastic teams freshman and above, but actually they use it mostly for conditioning.  With inexperienced players on an all-comers team, what makes you think that particular cone is going to represent the best pursuit angle for a given defender when a player breaks away on the sideline?  Plus, I think kids need more drills that are a body against a body, not cones or bags.

Also I would do at least some of a drill, if you can call it that, which I think was overdone where I first coached (compared to work on form) but which has teaching value and fun, and that is to break the team into a few squads and run mini-scrimmages of Oklahomas or whatever you call it.  A few players on each line plus a runner and linebacker, and let them go at it in rapid sequence, over and over.  Will it get ragged?  Sure, it'll be like sandlot ball but with helmets and pads.  But it will give the players experience at what they can do that works and what doesn't.  Don't try to control it too closely, this is how the inexperienced will get the feel of play, just police rule violations.  In Olderdog's case, since they've already played a game, it may not be necessary (though I wouldn't dismiss it completely), but this is advice for others who may be in pre-season, this or some subsequent year.


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @olderdog

I have so much to teach these new players

--Actually, you don't.  And if you try to, you will be overfilling them with info they can't use, won't need or will overwhelm them.  If you can block and tackle, it doesn’t matter what scheme you run, you will be successful.  If you can’t block and tackle, it doesn’t matter what scheme you run, you will not be successful.  Do not try to pour a gallon's worth of info into a glass that can only hold an ounce.  You are trying to explain a game to kids who can't even name all of the positions on the field, let alone understand the what and why of the positions' responsibilities. The challenges of coaching players this age are legion, however scaling down the info while amping up the reps is mandatory.  

I’m having to start at the basics of blocking and tackling.

--Good!  That's where you should be starting, regardless of the age and experience of your players.  Do you think you should be starting somewhere else?

While other coaches were installing offense the first three weeks

--You can't fall into the trap of looking around you and feeling pressure based on what you're seeing other teams doing.  I'm coaching a 10u.  Next to us on our practice field is a 9u.  They were "running plays" in their first week of practice.  We didn't begin to put in one play until Week 3.  Did players ask when we were going to put in a play?  Yes.  Did parents wonder aloud why the 9u was scrimmaging and running plays while we were doing an Enduro Drill for 30 minutes?  Yes.  Did that concern us?  No.  At this age group most coaches will start to install their offenses in Week 1.  I understand it, but I don't agree with it.  And their various "plays," are really just variations on the same play: RB runs outside while o-line base blocks; RB runs inside while o-line base blocks; Receiver goes out for a pass while o-line base blocks; Tricky Dicky play while o-line base blocks.  That's easy enough and we could do that, but we're teaching a systematic scheme that has authentic offensive plays. If you can block and tackle, it doesn’t matter what scheme you run, you will be successful.  If you can’t block and tackle, it doesn’t matter what scheme you run, you will not be successful. I reiterate this because too many coaches spend too much time on plays and not fundamentals.

I was teaching lineman to take their first two steps, principles of leverage, and wide base on board drills.

--Kids at this age are especially sensitive to the order of install, the number of reps and the primary goal (what the main thing in the drill?). If you screw up the order, add components that you could have left out or they don't understand the primary goal, then you will have an instant learning psychosis.  Example:  Teaching "steps" before they have been taught the "why" of those steps (the footwork) before they have been taught the primary goal will cause them not only to not learn "steps" but also make it harder for them to learn primary goal (because you've introduced something before the primary goal).  So in my instruction, while we progress from Learning Fundamental 1, to Learning Fundamental 2 to Learning Fundamental 3, I often see coaches teaching #3 and then #1 and then adding a couple of other aspects, before going to Fundamental #2.  Imagine trying to tell the kids a story from a book, but you're jumping from random chapter to random chapter.  This is what MOST coaches do, and it gets in the way of their teaching.

--I haven't seen your practices.  I do not know what/why/how you teach.  But let me give you an example of probably the most common mistake that I see in teaching the fundamentals of blocking.  This is the progression I usually see:

1. Repping stance.

2. Repping stance, steps. 

3. Repping stance, steps, angle.

4. Repping stance, steps, angle, contact.

5. Repping stance, steps, angle, contact, drive.

In this example, what has been repped the most?  (Stance.) What has been repped the least? (Drive.) What is the most important of these when it comes to successful blocking? (Drive!)  But it gets repped the least.  Why is the most important aspect of line play getting repped the least amount?  Because coaches are teaching their fundamentals out of order.  There's an incredible amount of time that's wasted in teaching stance.  I've had kids with lousy stances who were good blockers.  And I've had kids with great stances who were terrible blockers.  What does that tell me?  That stance (at this age) has little to do with how good of a blocker you are.  So why do pro and college coaches teach stance as their first o-line fundamental?  Because at that level, where the playing field is at the most even and everyone has exceptional athletes, they have to try to find minutia in the smallest of details that could possibly give them an advantage.  Why do high school coaches focus on stance first?  Only because the pros and colleges do.  High school coaches are the biggest copiers of non-applicable drill work and application out there.  But that doesn't mean that youth coaches should do that.  The pro/college coach is looking for the tiniest of advantages because every opponent is so good.  In youth ball, a tiny advantage will not make a difference where the talent gap between one player and another is huge.

On defense, We spent most of our time desensitizing them to contact with splatter tackling, form fit, on up to tee time. They actually tackle pretty well at this point in drills,

--That tells me that you've been successful in keeping it simple, and with enough reps.  Defense will always be ahead of offense in the early stages because 99.9% of coaches out there teach defense as reactive instead of proactive.  This means they are simply waiting to see what the offense is doing before they react/respond.  This is very simple.  (Although I am in the 0.1% of coaches that teach defensive play as proactive instead of reactive, which means my install is longer but their application of it is shorter.)

but when they get lined up, they forget everything they were taught.  

--They either:

Don't really understand the scheme.

You haven't taught it well.

You haven't repped it enough in Stressers.  ("Stressers" are a simulated high-pressure situation that you mimic, in order to tell how they will perform under pressure.)

The distractions of game day (venue is different from practice, different kids lining up against them, referees getting in the way, and all of the disorganized hoopla of game day).  

ALL OF THESE are addressable and solvable.  But let me give you an example of how players can unwittingly lie to you:

I was teaching my Tight End (10u) his responsibility on Power.  (i.e., his Down Block which we refer to as an "Inside Gap Block").  

Me:  You will ALWAYS hit the defender who is lined up closest to you, on your inside gap.  So where do you go?

TE:  To my inside gap.

Me:  Where is that?

TE: (He points)

Me: Do it.  Show me.

TE;  He blocks down, taking 5 or 6 steps.

Me:  Good.  This is what you do every time.  There will never be a time when you hit a man who is on you (I stand "on" him to indicate), or outside of you (I stand outside of him to indicate).  Do you understand?

TE: Yes.

Me: Any questions?

TE: No.

Me: Who do you hit?

TE: The man closest to my inside gap.

Me:  Good.  Do you ever hit anyone else?

TE: No.

Then I proceed to stand inside of him, on him, outside of him and have him indicate when he would block me and when he wouldn't.  He gets it right every time.

When we get ready to actually run the play, I move out of the way standing approximately 15 yards outside of him.  When we run the play, as soon as the ball is snapped, he runs directly to where I am.

Me:  WHY ARE YOU RUNNING TO ME?

TE:  You were standing over here.

Me:  Who are you supposed to hit?

TE: The man inside my gap!

Me: AM I INSIDE YOUR GAP?

TE:  No.

Me:  THEN WHY ARE YOU RUNNING TO ME?

TE:  (Pause)

So I understand the dilemma, but this is on me.  The kid wants to please, wants to be right, and wants to do well.  My responsibility is to teach him, so I have to simplify what is already simple.  That's on me.

We were not physically overmatched, we moved the ball ok, but stalled at key points with mistakes and missed assignments.

--You don't say what the mistakes were (fumbles, penalties, something else?)  If you're teaching 2-3 snap counts, that's a problem.  If you aren't teaching effective ball-carrying drills, they WILL fumble.

They were confused due to lack of reps. In the end, that’s my fault  in preparing them.

--While I can appreciate that you're in the less than 5% of coaches who actually take responsibility for their team's demise, are you sure of where their confusion comes from (Lack of reps?  How do you know?)  And if you're guessing, you can only guess at the solution.  Perhaps, like my TE, he "knows" his responsibility but the "stresser" of the play caused him to go blank.  This isn't a lack of reps; it's a lack of stressers.  5 stressers can trump 50 easy repetitions every time.

Tonight at practice we backed it all up and ran defensive units and reviewed/drilled assignments for 90 minutes in detail. Every player got specific attention, every question was answered that was asked. Then we spent 30 minutes running the same offensive play repeatedly until blockers understood their assignments and the back could hit the hole. That’s as far as I got. 

--That may be all you need.  We had only 2 plays going into our first game (Power and Wedge).  But I installed 3 last night.

I feel like it was a good practice, but it was a grind. The pace is slow. There really are bright spots, but we are raw. My question is, can I afford to keep this slow pace?

--I would suggest it.  When I was a youth header I was notoriously inefficient at my practices (I don't say that with pride or as a suggestion).  But I was determined to get blood from a turnip before that practice was over.  We were very successful with that, so it can work.  However, the reason I'm much more efficient now and can cover more ground is that I've learned which chapters of the book to throw away, so I can cover "David Copperfield" in 3 chapters now instead of 64.  Back then, I'd bog through all 64 chapters.

Can I afford not to? If they can’t run our base play with confidence, how can I move on?  

--You CAN'T.  But, you can learn to teach the base play with fewer steps and making the main thing the main thing AND you can install other plays off of it that don't change the rest of the offense.

Examples:  When I teach Power from the Double Wing, it can be a wordy and time-expensive process because unlike "Block Somebody" offenses, the play has a specific responsibility for every player.  How to teach it efficiently?  We teach from the end of the play, showing all the players where they are to end up to make this play work.  Next we only have to see that they get there. Believe me, it's much simpler/easier/faster to teach a play where they already know where they have to be than if you are showing them where they have to go and what their responsibility is.  it's like teaching a novel:  Make them read the last chapter, before reading the story from the beginning.  They'll understand it better.  A math analogy would be to give them the answer before giving them the question; then when the question is asked, they already know where the answer is headed.  I spent 13 years as a teacher and what works in the classroom works in the field.

The other suggestion is the simple add-on.  We teach Wedge (which can be a time consuming play), but "Wedge Fake 17 (or 18)" is the exact same play by 10 players with only the QB faking the handoff while keeping on a Sweep.  That's simple, fast and easy.  Once Power is in, Counter can be identical except for the hand-off man.  Once we learn Power, then we can sweep with a WB, and then adding it with the QB is easy. Since we only had Wedge and Power in until last night, I added Wedge Fake, a QB Sweep and WB Counter.

Another suggestion is a partial-install where you rep a play with your backfield this week and rep the play with your linemen next week.  It's not a fast way to work, but it allows you to move forward while taking smaller bites.

Am I right to gut this out and continue grinding and teaching until the light bulbs pop? Will patience on my part pay the biggest dividend for them and for the team, even if they can only run three plays effectively next week? 

--At your age-level, 3 plays (if they are run well) can work.  But how well do you run them?  You only need an inside play, an outside play and a misdirection.  You may be better off by keeping just those three plays and then running them from 2 different formations.  How we made it work last week was that our Wedge is an inside AND a misdirection play, while Power is an off-tackle play which can hit wider if the defense decides to keep packing it in.

--Sorry for the novel-length answer, but I thought your question deserved a deep dive.  If you feel that I can help you, feel free to give me a call.

--Dave

 

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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terrypjohnson
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Thank you for this counsel @CoachDP!! I can already see some areas that I could be doing better in.

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Posted by: @terrypjohnson

Thank you for this counsel @CoachDP!! I can already see some areas that I could be doing better in.

You're welcome, TPJ.  I hope there's something for the OP in there.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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olderdog
(@olderdog)
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Posted by: @bob-goodman
Posted by: @olderdog

I feel like it was a good practice, but it was a grind. The pace is slow. There really are bright spots, but we are raw. My question is, can I afford to keep this slow pace? Can I afford not to? If they can’t run our base play with confidence, how can I move on?  Am I right to gut this out and continue grinding and teaching until the light bulbs pop? Will patience on my part pay the biggest dividend for them and for the team, even if they can only run three plays effectively next week? 

Welcome to football.

I'm in a similar position this year, but as AC and with much older players but a "younger team".  On our roster of 19, 8th grade and under, about a third are carryovers (including one coach's son whom I've coached since 2017) while the rest have never played football, and a few have very little idea of the game.

I think you're mostly doing the right thing, but I differ in that on offense I would walk thru more plays, to give them an idea of why they're practicing the offensive fundamentals they do.  They need to see the big picture, even if few plays are actually installed yet.  Do it slowly, with the role of each position explained (demonstrated if you've got the bodies for it).

You'll also discover the 20% of drills that contribute 80% of their competitiveness at their stage.  Pursuit angles is one of the toughest things to learn, but also the most fun if you do it right, as well as paying off big on the scoreboard.  IMO doing it right means a drill where you mix in different players trying to cut one off running down a sideline.  Let them learn angles to take when they're faster, slower, or equally fast as the runner they're trying to cut off.  Do it "touch" fashion at first if you want to minimize contact, but at some point go "live".  Remember that although the players are running a long way into the hit, it's not coming anywhere close to head-on; also a runner's being forced out of bounds is as good as a tackle.

There's also a drill our team uses that I consider doing it wrong, though it's better than nothing.  We do it because the high school does it and it looks cool.  The defense lines up in their positions and stances at the snap, and on "go" each runs to a cone on the sideline.  Each position has its own cone to run to.  The idea is that you have the whole sideline covered, but do you see the disadvantage here?  It may be fine for interscholastic teams freshman and above, but actually they use it mostly for conditioning.  With inexperienced players on an all-comers team, what makes you think that particular cone is going to represent the best pursuit angle for a given defender when a player breaks away on the sideline?  Plus, I think kids need more drills that are a body against a body, not cones or bags.

Also I would do at least some of a drill, if you can call it that, which I think was overdone where I first coached (compared to work on form) but which has teaching value and fun, and that is to break the team into a few squads and run mini-scrimmages of Oklahomas or whatever you call it.  A few players on each line plus a runner and linebacker, and let them go at it in rapid sequence, over and over.  Will it get ragged?  Sure, it'll be like sandlot ball but with helmets and pads.  But it will give the players experience at what they can do that works and what doesn't.  Don't try to control it too closely, this is how the inexperienced will get the feel of play, just police rule violations.  In Olderdog's case, since they've already played a game, it may not be necessary (though I wouldn't dismiss it completely), but this is advice for others who may be in pre-season, this or some subsequent year.

Thanks, I like the idea of painting the big picture for them of what we are trying to accomplish. I could do that better for sure.

I Also like the idea of doing the body on body drills. Game speed drills that recreate game situations could be helpful to build that confidence. 


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olderdog
(@olderdog)
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@coachdp I can’t thank you enough for your detailed response.  Your story about your tight end doing “exactly” what he was told to do rings so true. I was showing a defensive player how to take on a lead blocker and create separation to defend the sweep. The next play, he attacked the lead blocker and blew him up while the running back sailed by untouched. I asked why he didn’t go after the ball carrier, and he told me “you said to take on the lead blocker.”  true, but not the point. 

On working backwards from the goal, I see the wisdom in your advice. Another example from the same practice: I was trying to figure out why my defensive tackles were not making any tackles on inside runs. The running back would run right by without being hit, have time to pick through the line, and then get to the second level. I started watching the eyes of one of the defensive linemen, and they were completely locked on the offensive lineman in front of him and he was driving him four yards into the backfield while the ball carrier ran by untouched. I asked him “what is your job?” He said “to get penetration into the backfield.” Now, I can’t say he was wrong because he has been told by coaches that we want the DTs to do that. But that was not the goal. I said, “no your job is to get our ball back! The runner has the football so he is our ultimate goal!” I realized at that moment that I had to redefine the goal for the whole defense. He was so focused on beating the O-lineman that he didn’t think to go after the ball. The drills we did were too oriented toward defeating the other guy, but we didn’t link it to the goal- getting the ball back. 

I think there is a lot I have to learn about Stressers also. How do you go about setting up those situations? 

I would like to take you up on the call. I can go into more detail if you like. Can I send a direct message with my contact info?

-Thanks 


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Posted by: @olderdog

I am head coach of a 9U team this year that has very little experience. The team last year played in the championship (lost), but I took over this year after the coach moved up a division and there are only three returning players from last year’s team. Over half my players played their first tackle football game this past Saturday.

I have so much to teach these new players, I’m having to start at the basics of blocking and tackling. While other coaches were installing offense the first three weeks, I was teaching lineman to take their first two steps, principles of leverage, and wide base on board drills. On defense, We spent most of our time desensitizing them to contact with splatter tackling, form fit, on up to tee time. They actually tackle pretty well at this point in drills, but when they get lined up, they forget everything they were taught.  On the field they are confused and timid.  As a result, I installed the basic plays and defensive scheme later than I would like, focusing on building fundamentals. 

At our first game, we played a team we could have beaten. We were not physically overmatched, we moved the ball ok, but stalled at key points with mistakes and missed assignments. Our defense was really good at points, but again, key missed tackles (bad angles) led to a few cheap touchdowns. Bottom line, we had kids who were confused about their roles and made mistakes. Lost 22-0.  

If they’re confused, they aren’t aggressive. If they aren’t aggressive they play timid. They were confused due to lack of reps. In the end, that’s my fault  in preparing them.

Tonight at practice we backed it all up and ran defensive units and reviewed/drilled assignments for 90 minutes in detail. Every player got specific attention, every question was answered that was asked. Then we spent 30 minutes running the same offensive play repeatedly until blockers understood their assignments and the back could hit the hole. That’s as far as I got. 

I feel like it was a good practice, but it was a grind. The pace is slow. There really are bright spots, but we are raw. My question is, can I afford to keep this slow pace? Can I afford not to? If they can’t run our base play with confidence, how can I move on?  Am I right to gut this out and continue grinding and teaching until the light bulbs pop? Will patience on my part pay the biggest dividend for them and for the team, even if they can only run three plays effectively next week? 

You have the privilege not to re coach players with bad habits from other teams. Your goal (or mine) would be ...leavem better than they showed up. Give them the gift of fundamentals and love for the game. No matter the outcome of the season, if that's the end goal you'll have the best most fun year of coaching. 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @olderdog

I think there is a lot I have to learn about Stressers also. How do you go about setting up those situations? 

--Stressers can be as simplistic or as elaborate as you want to make them.  "It's 4th in goal at the one.  You've got to shoot the gap and blow up the play!  You've got to!"  They can be one-on-one, half-line or full out scrimmages, but the ONE thing they CAN'T be is a regular scrimmage play with little to nothing at stake.  Ours are usually situational ("4th and 7 from the 10 yard line") but they can also be pure matchups where Donny is calling out Michael to match up against each other.  When I was a 1st Grade teacher and it was raining outside, we would have to have recess in our classroom.  So we would play, "Musical Chairs."  But this wasn't just any Musical Chairs...this was the "Texas Death Match World Championships of Musical Chairs, Winner Takes All."  The kids were so amped up to win at this because I amped it up, that they were crying and fighting when they couldn't win.  To see two kids slowly pacing around a chair ready to pounce on it (and each other) was amazing.  I was eventually told by the principal that we couldn't play Musical Chairs anymore because the kids were getting too focused on winning.  True story. 

I would like to take you up on the call. I can go into more detail if you like. Can I send a direct message with my contact info?

--I will reach out.

--Dave

 

 

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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olderdog
(@olderdog)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 10
Topic starter  

@bucksweep58 

Thanks for bringing the bright side! I definitely don’t have to break bad habits! 


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 9762
 

DP wrote something I've been complaining about for years:

High school coaches are the biggest copiers of non-applicable drill work and application out there.  But that doesn't mean that youth coaches should do that.  The pro/college coach is looking for the tiniest of advantages because every opponent is so good.  In youth ball, a tiny advantage will not make a difference where the talent gap between one player and another is huge.

It's one of the reasons I want to go from AC to HC, where I can get us out from under such nonsense.  I'd been hoping to this year, but life circumstance made me doubt I'd have the time, until it was too late and the guys visited me to get me to AC again.

Actually in my current club I'm not even sure becoming a team's HC rather than club president would get us out from under, because this club has been so fixated on following the footsteps of Newton (NJ) HS, whose football program has been so competitive for so long.  Admittedly, a high proportion from the club go on to play in that program, and yet for all the trophies and plaudits the HS team brings home, the youth club has not had outstandingly competitive teams on average in the league.


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