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coachmiket
(@coachmiket)
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We are clearly going around in circles here with no end in sight.  As I said before, in my opinion, it's a chicken/egg thing.

I don't believe that you can 100% definitively say that the understanding of the importance of their role and responsibility MUST come before the enjoyment.

Now let's all just agree to disagree.
🙂


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Wing-n-It
(@robert)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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it's a chicken/egg thing.

Wait, the chicken egg thing was solved.
Science proved back in 2015 that the protein from the shell of the egg could only come from a chicken so the chicken has to be first.

LOL
Just bustin your chops

I don't think we disagree much, its mearly a different understanding of semantics

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Topic starter  

I have a genuine care for them and in turn they give me some pretty good effort and attention and our practices are usually very spirited and productive.

^ Which is a crucial component in coaching success.  But I can tell you that I've heard a hundred coaches talk about how much they cared for/about their players, when they actually demonstrated otherwise.

Having genuine care for players so that they know, understand and actually feel it is why so many daddy-ballers find success difficult to achieve.  They're there for their son and to insure his success.  It's hard to get the rest of the players to feel his care when he is so singularly focused on his own boy (youth level), or perhaps trying to prove that he is the next Bill Walsh (high school level).

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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coachmiket
(@coachmiket)
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Wait, the chicken egg thing was solved.
Science proved back in 2015 that the protein from the shell of the egg could only come from a chicken so the chicken has to be first.

LOL
Just bustin your chops

I don't think we disagree much, its mearly a different understanding of semantics

Probably.  Gotta love the struggle of communicating on a message board.  If we were in person we probably would have high fived or something by now and moved on to another topic!

If we were on another kind of message board, we might have already resorted to disparaging remarks about the one's we love.  ??? 8)


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coachmiket
(@coachmiket)
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^ Which is a crucial component in coaching success.  But I can tell you that I've heard a hundred coaches talk about how much they cared for/about their players, when they actually demonstrated otherwise.

Having genuine care for players so that they know, understand and actually feel it is why so many daddy-ballers find success difficult to achieve.  They're there for their son and to insure his success.  It's hard to get the rest of the players to feel his care when he is so singularly focused on his own boy (youth level), or perhaps trying to prove that he is the next Bill Walsh (high school level).

--Dave

Absolutely.  I don't remember who said it or where I read it.  There are good odds that it was on this board many years ago and you actually said it.  But kids are not dumb.  They can sense a phony.  And that includes sensing fake care from their coaches.


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
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Lar, I gotta say I've never taught off of a diagram or a piece of paper.  That leaves too much to chance.  Our header taught a new play off of a diagram and the player assured the header that he understood.  We ran it in the game for the first time with disastrous results.

If I want them to follow a path, they go through the path for real that I've made and I'm making them do it themselves as we instruct.  Not off of a diagram, a piece of paper or an explanation.  The ONLY way that I know if they know what I want and how to do it is if they've already done it.

And often getting them to do it needs one other unmentioned step.

A few days ago teaching down blocking I was sure they'd get it from my explanation, hand waving and pointing, as they were standing in front of the sled.  First two reps, I was nonplussed that none of them did.  So I got down and showed them once on the sled myself, and they all did it right.


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coachmiket
(@coachmiket)
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Lar, I gotta say I've never taught off of a diagram or a piece of paper.  That leaves too much to chance.  Our header taught a new play off of a diagram and the player assured the header that he understood.  We ran it in the game for the first time with disastrous results.

If I want them to follow a path, they go through the path for real that I've made and I'm making them do it themselves as we instruct.  Not off of a diagram, a piece of paper or an explanation.  The ONLY way that I know if they know what I want and how to do it is if they've already done it.

--Dave

One thing I try to do with my basketball teams in practice when we are scrimmaging is use a timeout and draw something up on the dry erase board and see if they can come out of the timeout and execute it.  Sometimes it will be something we have already worked on and sometimes it will be something a little newer.  I found out early on that there is a disconnect from seeing it on the clipboard vs acting it out in real life.  This method has helped with cure that.


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CHARLIEDONTSURF
(@charleydontsurf)
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Good post.

A smart guy once observed, "Our culture tends to put 'failure to learn' on the learner, but I think a lot of what we call learning disabilities in this country are really 'teaching disabilities.'"

I agree 100%, and I especially agree in youth sports where there's little or no accountability, and, like modern parenting, we're all engaged in a mass delusion that let's adults take credit for all the good stuff, but none of the blame for the bad stuff.  Unless, of course, one of those adults is teaching/coaching our kid, in which case he deserves all the blame since we're experts at identifying and fixing other people's problems lol.


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SingleWingGoombah
(@singlewinggoombah)
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I think it is important at the youth level to explain why something is important.  Football IQ is important.  Incredibly important.  You can get kids in perfect form for blocking or tackling all you want, but puberty is going to come eventually, and there bodies will undergo massive changes that often times are going to change their movement, ability to move, etc.  It will not change the football IQ though.  And I can guarantee you on thing, their high school coaches will be incredibly appreciative of you if you are sending them kids with high football IQ.

I


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bxdefense
(@bxdefense)
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On the other hand, I finally resorted to bird-dogging the defense. I hate bird dogging and had vowed to never do it again. This team needs it. CB's job is to take 3 back pedal steps and play football. One corner kept coming forward . . . in bird dog. 3 steps, freeze. It took us 4 reps to fix him. I am not confident that he will take 3 back pedal steps in the game. Is there a magic way to explain to a kid to take 3 steps backward instead of forward? Other than "Aiden, stop walking forward at the snap. Take 3 steps backward. Every time."?

It's an unnatural movement with very little return on the investment required to get it right at corner. Why exert the energy into something that doesn't translate anywhere else? What do you want him to do after the backpedal? Probably, shuffle,turn and run,  correct?

What's the worst thing to happen to a corner? IMO, being stuck in a pedal when he should be running. That's why I stopped teaching it to my corners in favor of the shuffle technique. If they've played basketball or baseball before they already know the move. At a 45 degree angle and told to shuffle, he will head into the direction you want him to without thinking.

Just my $0.02

Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard


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bxdefense
(@bxdefense)
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Some of us are natural teachers, others have to work hard to fine tune the skill. Put yourselves in your players shoes and ask yourself does what your saying even make sense to YOU? Before you teach a drill, try it. Walk yourself through all the drills and techniques you think works. Chances are if you can't get it yourself within a few minutes, your players won't either so you have to find another way.

Youtube and clinics are great but that doesn't mean it will fit the level you are coaching. I can't tell you how frustrating it is to work with a coach that wants to implement a technique he sees on Sundays to a group of players who are just trying to get some meaningful reps on Friday night.

Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard


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patriotsfatboy1
(@patriotsfatboy1)
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A good coach is a good teacher. I think it was Red Auerbach who said that he had to be part teacher and part psychiatrist. Some players need a public kick in the butt and some needed quiet encouragement.

Different players learn in different ways. Some can see it on film, some can see it on paper, and some have to be all hands on. We need to learn that we need to teach across multiple methods, particularly with younger kids if we want to be successful. It does take patience and perseverance, which I also think are characteristics of good teachers.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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It's an unnatural movement with very little return on the investment required to get it right at corner. Why exert the energy into something that doesn't translate anywhere else? What do you want him to do after the backpedal? Probably, shuffle,turn and run,  correct?

What's the worst thing to happen to a corner? IMO, being stuck in a pedal when he should be running. That's why I stopped teaching it to my corners in favor of the shuffle technique. If they've played basketball or baseball before they already know the move. At a 45 degree angle and told to shuffle, he will head into the direction you want him to without thinking.

Just my $0.02

I'm typically right with you on this, but it was simply a matter of which direction to go in and he was the only kid out of about 6 who couldn't or wouldn't do it. We did end up scrapping the 3 step drop, but this kid would defy us on the next technique no matter what it was.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Topic starter  

We did end up scrapping the 3 step drop, but this kid would defy us on the next technique no matter what it was.

Instead of a 3-step drop, why not start him out 3 steps deeper?  Then he's already where you're trying to get him to be.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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coachmiket
(@coachmiket)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 1371
 

Instead of a 3-step drop, why not start him out 3 steps deeper?  Then he's already where you're trying to get him to be.

--Dave

And therein lies another issue of being a good teacher/coach.  Troubleshooting and being open minded to alternative solutions.  I did this in basketball with my press breaks and zone offense.  Instead of teaching kids different patterns to remember to get to the areas we need them in, we just start them out right in the area they are supposed to end up in.  A trapping press defense or a halfcourt zone defense is going to be moving and rotating but now our guys are already where we want them to be and there is less waiting and hesitation when we move the ball.

Sometimes taking all the technical stuff out of it and just simplifying things in real world terms to the kids is the best route.


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