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mahonz
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Ronin
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The half that don't want their kids to play are called moms.

Kidding (sort of...)

At the youth level, football is one of the safest sports.  Wish somebody could do a story on that!

At the High School level... in Oklahoma, seems like we saw a surge in injuries this year.  I blame the fact that they won't allow the kids to practice until right before the season.  And even then, no contact until a week before the first game.  Stupid!  How can they practice safe tackling techniques if they cannot practice contact at all?


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mahonz
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The half that don't want their kids to play are called moms.

R

That's the part that kinda hit me....us youth coaches need the Moms to say yes.  :'(

I have always recruited kids that have never played before in the off season. Same general concerns now that I got 20 years ago but now its getting harder to close the deal.

It used to be Mom would cave in because Jr wants to play with his friend(s). Not the way it goes anymore.

Had a kid move to my Grandson's school last year from Germany at Christmas time. He befriended my Grandson immediately.  The perfect football specimen so this was going to be a slam dunk so we opened up the lines of communication but Mom and Dad were confused. When Mom found out we were trying to recruit him to play football and not futbol the answer was hell no....way too dangerous. He will be playing futbol. Jr was crushed.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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jrk5150
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Granted it's a small sample, but of the 5 or 6 families where I know there is an argument about Jr. playing, in all but one it's the Moms arguing for and the Dads arguing against.


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Ronin
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Granted it's a small sample, but of the 5 or 6 families where I know there is an argument about Jr. playing, in all but one it's the Moms arguing for and the Dads arguing against.

Funny you say that because I have two on my team whose mom's love football and dad's prefer they played baseball/soccer in the Fall.

Though I did lose three kids going from flag to tackle because their mom's thought it was too dangerous.  Two of them are requesting to play with us this next season after watching us play. 


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mahonz
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Granted it's a small sample, but of the 5 or 6 families where I know there is an argument about Jr. playing, in all but one it's the Moms arguing for and the Dads arguing against.

J

That is crazy.  >:(

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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Malibu
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Funny you say that because I have two on my team whose mom's love football and dad's prefer they played baseball/soccer in the Spring.

Though I did lose three kids going from flag to tackle because their mom's thought it was too dangerous.  Two of them are requesting to play with us this next season after watching us play.

I agree with the dads on this one (assuming they are playing football in the fall).


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Ronin
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I agree with the dads on this one (assuming they are playing football in the fall).

  Meant Fall.  I corrected it.


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patriotsfatboy1
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Ditka just had an interview where he said that he would not have his 8 year old play football. Peter King talked about it in today's MMQB.


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Michael
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Bob Goodman
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http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2014-12-10/bloomberg-politics-poll-half-of-americans-dont-want-their-sons-playing-football

Interesting, but do you think the poll result would've been much different 50 or 100 yrs. ago?

Also, the "generational divide" may reflect not a cohort difference but merely an age difference.  Don't grandparents tend to let you have more fun than your parents do?  On 2nd thought, the numbers seem to run the opposite way in this poll, with the old folks being more conservative with the kids; maybe grandparents aren't like they used to be.


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jrk5150
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J

That is crazy.  >:(

Actually, I was one of them.  I was adamantly against my son playing youth football, my wife signed him up without telling me when he was 7. I was primarily afraid that he'd take a huge hit and be afraid of football and never play again.  I didn't think he could intellectually overcome the emotional impact of a big hit at that age. And I didn't feel like it was important - I didn't play until HS, and I started as a soph, so how important could it be?

I was wrong.  Really, really wrong. He got the big hit (a couple of them, actually), and he got up and eventually got back in there. YOUTH football changed his life for the better.  And I also didn't realize at the time that youth football has nothing to do with HS football whatsoever.

And by the way - I saw kids spooked by that big hit, quit and never play again. Maybe that would have happened when they were older, who knows.


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tiger46
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Actually, I was one of them.  I was adamantly against my son playing youth football, my wife signed him up without telling me when he was 7. I was primarily afraid that he'd take a huge hit and be afraid of football and never play again.  I didn't think he could intellectually overcome the emotional impact of a big hit at that age. And I didn't feel like it was important - I didn't play until HS, and I started as a soph, so how important could it be?

I was wrong.  Really, really wrong. He got the big hit (a couple of them, actually), and he got up and eventually got back in there. YOUTH football changed his life for the better.  And I also didn't realize at the time that youth football has nothing to do with HS football whatsoever.

And by the way - I saw kids spooked by that big hit, quit and never play again. Maybe that would have happened when they were older, who knows.

It happens.  I saw my son take one of the biggest hits that I've ever personally witnessed in youth football.  No kidding.  The kid that hit him was probably the best player in the league.  You should have seen him run through every defense thrown against him.  Think mini- Earl Campbell.  He blindsided my son (was a perfectly legal block) while my son was trying to chase down a runner on a kick-off.  I'm sure all of you coaches have seen similar hits at higher levels on Youtube, or whatever.
LOL! I thought I was going to have to scrape my son up with a shovel.  But, after awhile he got up- hurt, to be sure- and, wanted to keep playing. He even took another big hit from the same kid when he tried to half-heartedly tackle him across the legs.  Obviously, that first hit made quite an impression on him.  I figured he'd be scared of that kid for the rest of his life; let alone the rest of the game.... Nope. Fast forward to the 2nd game against them later in the season.  My son was trying to blast all of the equipment off of that big kid on any tackle he made against him.  No one in the stadium could have been more shocked than I was.

The way that I deal with my players taking big hits is to tell them about one of the times that I had my bell rung as a player.  The feel. the stinging sensation in the nose. Disorentation, etc.. Then I do a Ray Lewis and yell, "Welcome to football, boy!"  I clap them on the back and treat it more as a right of passage than something to go to the sideline and be ashamed of having happened to you because it happens/have happened to all of us.

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass


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mahonz
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Interesting, but do you think the poll result would've been much different 50 or 100 yrs. ago?

Also, the "generational divide" may reflect not a cohort difference but merely an age difference.  Don't grandparents tend to let you have more fun than your parents do?  On 2nd thought, the numbers seem to run the opposite way in this poll, with the old folks being more conservative with the kids; maybe grandparents aren't like they used to be.

B

I agree....as a Grandpa myself my Grandkids get away with a lot of stuff when Im in charge.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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patriotsfatboy1
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Actually, I was one of them.  I was adamantly against my son playing youth football, my wife signed him up without telling me when he was 7. I was primarily afraid that he'd take a huge hit and be afraid of football and never play again.  I didn't think he could intellectually overcome the emotional impact of a big hit at that age. And I didn't feel like it was important - I didn't play until HS, and I started as a soph, so how important could it be?

I was wrong.  Really, really wrong. He got the big hit (a couple of them, actually), and he got up and eventually got back in there. YOUTH football changed his life for the better.  And I also didn't realize at the time that youth football has nothing to do with HS football whatsoever.

And by the way - I saw kids spooked by that big hit, quit and never play again. Maybe that would have happened when they were older, who knows.

Me too. My son started wrestling because his friends were doing it. Then those kids wanted to play football. My wife and I were not for it, but we supported his choice because he wanted to be active and be part of a team. That was 4 seasons ago.

My wife and I were talking about it the other day. We were wrong about considering not letting him play football. Yes, there are injury concerns, but that happens with riding a bike and just living your life. Rather than protecting him by keeping him away, we chose to get involved and learn how to make him less likely to get injured while he played.

Youth football has been very positive for him. I am not sure if he will play in HS, but I will support his choice.


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