Fun Meaningless Soc...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Fun Meaningless Soccer vs. Football Debate....

Page 1 / 3

Coach D
(@coach-d)
Bronze
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 359
Topic starter  

I have been in a mild and ongoing debate about the difference between soccer and football with several friends of mine, and even saw a bit of a stir on a different thread on this website which prompted me to start this.  I don't really want to start a debate here but it does get me thinking about what other coaches say (helps me determine just how crazy I am).  I have already jokingly mentioned my disdain for soccer on other threads and don't wish to beat on that one more. 

The issue was soccer being tough (or "just as tough as football") because kids get hurt playing it just like football.  My buddies both played D1 soccer for some great teams and swear that it is "every bit as tough if not more than football".  Comparing the two is crazy to me, but it made me think about why I so adamantly argue football as being the tougher sport, and its this.  Injuries happen in soccer but they are accidents that for the most part are avoided as best as possible.  Injuries happen in football because it is part of the nature of what we are doing.  Soccer is taking the 'Hotwheels' track and making a nice oval to race your toy cars around.  Do they come off the track sometimes? Sure.  Football is making the track into a figure eight with the intent to cause collisions.  The sport is designed to break each other, and the team less broken wins..... 

With that being said, do we "want" to hurt the other team?  It is a fair question and everyone of us will diplomatically say "no" - "we teach proper tackling techniques and skills and hard playing within the rules".  I certainly don't enjoy seeing a kid get hurt - I promise you that!  But do I promote the hard physical play that will inevitably end up with the chance of getting hurt being high?  Yes.  Do I teach still hitting an optioning QB after he has pitched the ball to demoralize him a bit and get him pitching too soon?  Yes.  What about the goosebumps we get when we see one of our kids pancake block a kid on special teams or on a crack, or when our light weight safety finally punishes a guy catching one over the middle?  When I played, did I want to hurt the other team - Flippin right I did!  Did they want to hurt me?  You better believe they did. 

It is for me the thing about football that makes it so different and wonderful.  It is the ultimate team game.  Name another sport (perhaps there are a few) where if one guy quits on a play, it could be disaster for another player?  I have seen season and even career ending injuries because of it.  It's what makes football radically tougher than soccer! 

Anyway - that's my - albeit - unnecessary argument  ;D  Who cares right?   

So I am just wondering for fun - what is your take?  Do we want to hurt other teams?  Do you think I am too hard on soccer?  Should I just get new friends who appreciate football more?  ๐Ÿ˜€


Quote
Test Account
(@test-account)
Kryptonite
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 13421
 

do i intentionally teach my players to hurt other people? NO! absolutely without a doubt no......But I do want to hurt them. And the way I can do that is to make them submit, quit, have them cower to fatigue......which cause lapses in fundamentals, which causes them to get hurt.

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


ReplyQuote
Coach D
(@coach-d)
Bronze
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 359
Topic starter  

do i intentionally teach my players to hurt other people? NO! absolutely without a doubt no......But I do want to hurt them. And the way I can do that is to make them submit, quit, have them cower to fatigue......which cause lapses in fundamentals, which causes them to get hurt.

That's a pretty good way of putting it!  Totally agree! 


ReplyQuote
seeindouble
(@seeindouble)
Gold
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 1590
 

The thing I hate about soccer is the offsides rule, that makes soccer the only sport that DISCRIMINATES against speed.
The thing I like about soccer...Hope Solo...She's HOT  :P!!!


ReplyQuote
jrk5150
(@jrk5150)
Diamond
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 6431
 

I played 5 years of youth soccer, 3 years of HS football.

I went to a college with no football team, but their soccer teams were very good - women went to Div 2 final 4 two of the years I was there. 

One of my best friends played in the old NASL, so he was pretty good in the day.

So yeah, I feel like I know a bit about the game, and have been around it quite a bit.

All I can say is this - we had a guy who was a long time coach in our program and at the HS pass away a year ago.  They did a memorial for him before the varsity game, had all the youth players come out on the field with the varsity players for a moment of silence.  We were gathered in the hallway that leads to locker room (it was pouring out), lined up on both sides.  The kids were going to follow the varsity players out onto the field.  The varsity team came down the hallway in between all the kids, and man, that click clack isn't just an UA commercial, it's a powerful sound.  I got goose bumps.

The soccer team filing out just wouldn't have been the same.


ReplyQuote
CoachDoc
(@collin)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 340
 

I have my kids play both, and coach both.  It is obvious that they are way different. 

For the off-sides comment, it is also the case in hockey.  Hockey vs. football, now there is a much more interesting debate. 


ReplyQuote
DL
 DL
(@daniel-lyons)
Platinum
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 4984
 

The thing I hate about soccer is the offsides rule, that makes soccer the only sport that DISCRIMINATES against speed.
The thing I like about soccer...Hope Solo...She's HOT  :P!!!

I watch the world cup and I thought the same thing.  The offsides rule allows the entire team to play defense (gives them time to get back) so that you rarely see a great player dribbling through and around players to score.

Scores mostly happen off corner kicks and free kicks.  Occasionally, you will see a great pass that results in a score.  Take away the offsides or at least make it up to the goal box and you will see fast breaks and the teams forced to defend the whole field rather than just 1/4 of it.


ReplyQuote
Coach Kyle
(@coach-kyle)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 3935
 

I have been in a mild and ongoing debate about the difference between soccer and football with several friends of mine, and even saw a bit of a stir on a different thread on this website which prompted me to start this.  I don't really want to start a debate here but it does get me thinking about what other coaches say (helps me determine just how crazy I am).  I have already jokingly mentioned my disdain for soccer on other threads and don't wish to beat on that one more. 

The issue was soccer being tough (or "just as tough as football") because kids get hurt playing it just like football.  My buddies both played D1 soccer for some great teams and swear that it is "every bit as tough if not more than football".  Comparing the two is crazy to me, but it made me think about why I so adamantly argue football as being the tougher sport, and its this.  Injuries happen in soccer but they are accidents that for the most part are avoided as best as possible.  Injuries happen in football because it is part of the nature of what we are doing.  Soccer is taking the 'Hotwheels' track and making a nice oval to race your toy cars around.  Do they come off the track sometimes? Sure.  Football is making the track into a figure eight with the intent to cause collisions.  The sport is designed to break each other, and the team less broken wins..... 

With that being said, do we "want" to hurt the other team?  It is a fair question and everyone of us will diplomatically say "no" - "we teach proper tackling techniques and skills and hard playing within the rules".  I certainly don't enjoy seeing a kid get hurt - I promise you that!  But do I promote the hard physical play that will inevitably end up with the chance of getting hurt being high?  Yes.  Do I teach still hitting an optioning QB after he has pitched the ball to demoralize him a bit and get him pitching too soon?  Yes.  What about the goosebumps we get when we see one of our kids pancake block a kid on special teams or on a crack, or when our light weight safety finally punishes a guy catching one over the middle?  When I played, did I want to hurt the other team - Flippin right I did!  Did they want to hurt me?  You better believe they did. 

It is for me the thing about football that makes it so different and wonderful.  It is the ultimate team game.  Name another sport (perhaps there are a few) where if one guy quits on a play, it could be disaster for another player?  I have seen season and even career ending injuries because of it.  It's what makes football radically tougher than soccer! 

Anyway - that's my - albeit - unnecessary argument  ;D  Who cares right?   

So I am just wondering for fun - what is your take?  Do we want to hurt other teams?  Do you think I am too hard on soccer?  Should I just get new friends who appreciate football more?  ๐Ÿ˜€

In high school I went from cross country to football. I didn't find the transition very hard. I wasn't good at any of the skills, but I could hit. I don't think everyone on the cross country team could do that, but I was making the switch because I was probably too big to be doing cross country. I imagine the transition would be similar from soccer.

On the flip side, I couldn't go straight from football and start playing soccer with any success at all. I probably wouldn't have lasted the whole game, and I probably wouldn't have been very good. Does that mean I would leave soccer with more physical punishment on my body than football? No. I don't think so. I think football takes the cake in that area.

My point is, soccer turns you into an athlete, and an athlete is an athlete is an athlete. Football doesn't do that.

The hardest sport I think I've ever played was rugby. I'll bet wrestling was even harder but I only did that once.

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


ReplyQuote
JCYL
 JCYL
(@jcyl)
Copper
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 96
 

The hardest sport I think I've ever played was rugby. I'll bet wrestling was even harder but I only did that once.

took the words right out of my mouth! lets see soccer players take a couple lateral drops then say whos tuff.

soccer is a gentlemen game played by hooligans

rugby is a hooligans game played by gentlemen


ReplyQuote
Coach D
(@coach-d)
Bronze
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 359
Topic starter  

soccer is a gentlemen game played by hooligans

rugby is a hooligans game played by gentlemen

I was gonna mention rugby!  Totally BA!!! 

I have to say, if the argument becomes about athletic, then soccer players are right up there, shoot, I would even say basketball players are some of the most athletic guys. If its toughness (which is what my friends argue) then I would say Football and rugby and yes Hockey too.  I used to play a lot of hockey.  That can get brutal! 

As far as just physically grueling, the hardest thing I have done so far was race Mt bikes cross country for a while.  That got very tough.  Did the downhill thing too, but cross country mt. biking is downright painful (at least for an ex football player)...


ReplyQuote
JCYL
 JCYL
(@jcyl)
Copper
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 96
 

  The important thing with football is one athlete is not like the other, so just to say soccer players are athletes is moot. If you have nothing but thoroughbreds in the stable whatโ€™s  gona plow the field, football demands varying talents. Id say a sumo wrestler would transition to lineman easily how would our soccer athlete fair trying to drive block this mountain of an athlete


ReplyQuote
CRM1241
(@crm1241)
Copper
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 40
 

Hurt yes - injure no. Someone is going to be hurting after a game, and I tell the kids to make sure it is the other guy. Don't absorb the blow, deliver the blow, etc.

If God had wanted man to play soccer, he wouldn't have given us arms - Mike Ditka


ReplyQuote
Roden10
(@roden10)
Bronze
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 421
 

The difference between football and soccer is this. Football is a violent sport. Soccer has violent fans! ๐Ÿ˜‰

Tim

If your feet aren't moving, you're not blocking!


ReplyQuote
CoachCalande
(@www-coachcalande-com)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7059
 

A bit of background...

I lived in Italy for 3.5 years.( late elem school/jr high)  During that time I played tackle football and soccer, baseball and basketball too.  The beauty of soccer is that you really need NO equipment.  You dont need to speak the same language...wed play pickup soccer games on any surface using a variety of different types of balls. I can remember playing "foot tennis" with a soccer ball over a tennis net with the Italian kids in our neighborhood. (tennis but use a soccer ball and soccer rules, head ball, trap, kick etc).  WE could play a 1:1 or 2:2 soccer game in a small alley...you will have a hard time doing that in football.  Was it fun? absolutely.

But it was NOTHING MORE THAN SOMETHING TO DO UNTIL FOOTBALL SEASON.

In the states, I continued to play soccer and tackle football. In PE Class Id dominate the soccer action and the PE teacher would complain that I wasnt playing soccer , I was instead a backup tailback and corner on the football team. I dare say that if soccer was a spring sport, Id have played it instead of baseball, which I find boring for long stretches. 

As an adult, I coached soccer and football (had to coach girls soccer to get my first head coaching gig, blackmail...what can I say?)

In any case, my kids now play soccer. I watch the world cup and will sometimes watch bits and pieces of international friendly games. 

Some things that really stand out (and irk me) about the soccer experience my kids are getting.

* my child will come off the field, after struggling...I expect to see and hear some "coaching up" of the kid, so they can get better..instead I hear "good work" and nothing more. NO WONDER SOME KIDS CHOOSE SOCCER. Hollow praise...

* my other child will literally stand and DO NOTHING on the soccer "pitch" and the coach isnt chewing his butt out (I want to , but they dont allow parents to get on the kids or coach from the sidelines- I respect that)...the kids not even trying, barely even knows theres a game going on yet he stays on the field.  NO WONDER SOME KIDS CHOOSE SOCCER.  He also expects a trophy after the season.  I keep thinking "man, if he did that in a football game, hed get killed"...his teammates certainly wouldnt tolerate it.

* another one of mine scores a goal....inside im both happy and sick at the same time. Sick because THERE WAS NO GOALIE, GOD FORBID SOMEONE HAD TO BE TOLD "YOURE THE GOALIE, YOU DONT LIKE IT, TOO BAD!"...NO WONDER SOME KIDS CHOOSE SOCCER.

Seriously...its pretty sickening.  Trust me, the Italians always had a goalie, someone GOOD had to play goalie.

The puke that we call "coaching" is NOTHING MORE THAN CODDELING KIDS.  Is it fun? sure, the kids are running around and having fun, thats great.  But wheres the work ethic? wheres the ability to tolerate criticism and wheres the lesson that you have TO REALLY DO YOUR BEST OR LOSE YOUR JOB?

I even heard one coach tell one of his kids, who was head and shoulders the most dominant player in the league that he could no longer score goals so someone else could have a "turn" scoring goals? a "turn?"...are you KIDDING ME???... My soccer skills improved while I was in Italy getting EMBARASSED by little kids who had ball skills that I could only dream off...kids who were sometimes poor and hungry but who WORKED AT IT against ANY LEVEL OF COMPETITION THEY COULD FIND. It was common enough to find a field of people playing soccer, younger kids mixed with teens and even some adults....they played to win, they played hard and didnt "take turns" scoring goals...

Its not the game thats the problem, its the culture driving the sport and trying to deemphasize being competitive....deemphasizing the very things that made this country so great and the very things that make football such a valuable thing for our youth. Now, on the other hand, the positive things I have seen....I dont hear any coaches calling little kids "heartless" or "gutless" or unflattering names..those things are NOT NECESSARY to teach the game or life lessons.  I do see kids running and moving and thats positive...they could just as well be content to sit at home and play xbox. 

IM willing to accept that my disiterested child will probably stay that way, with just about any team sport...but we have pushed him some. Soccer gave him a chance to play a sport, with teammates, without being broken as a tackling dummy.

Football and soccer really shouldnt be compared...they are sooo different. Soccer is fun, football is a battle and the exhilaration of competing in football is so much different from the running around and kicking the ball in a soccer match. 

to put it bluntly, you have to face fear at a whole different level as a football player. Theres really no fear in soccer.

MOJO    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtcRmKnRcsA

Go to WWW.COACHCALANDE.COM  for Double Wing DVDs, Playbook, Drills Manuals, Practice footage and emagazines. Ask me about our new 38 special dvds!


ReplyQuote
Michael
(@michael)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 12890
 

Trust me, the Italians always had a goalie, someone GOOD had to play goalie.

Hope Solo was an All-American forward on a state champion team in high school.

My understanding is that as the pyramid narrows as kids get older, forwards tend to move up and midfielders and defenders tend to get dropped.  The best forwards stay at forward and the others become midfielders and defenders.  If you couldn't play forward in high school, it's tough to see the field in college.  That may not be how everyone does it, but that's how a coach at a top program explained it to me.

Kind of like baseball, I guess, in that a lot of major league players played pitcher and/or shortstop in little league.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


ReplyQuote
Page 1 / 3
Share: