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Gotta WANT It!

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GP
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(@gpenn44)
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So many on here SLAM other coaches for telling players "you've gotta want it!"

Granted, in youth ball it is rarely accompanied by any actual coaching which is the real underlying criticism. Nonetheless, over and over I have seen that phrase isolated as a surefire tell that you're dealing with an inexperienced Daddy Baller.

So imagine my glee as I am reading the Drive Blocking section of Rick Trickett's book and there it is..."He has to want it. He has to want to whip this defender."

8)

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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J. Potter (seabass)
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There is nothing inherently wrong with the the phrase. It's just often not the real issue.


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bigshel
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Coach Trickett gives a LITTLE more information than that. Lol. Point taken though.


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CoachDP
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"You gotta want it" is an observation.  But for some coaches, it serves as "coaching."

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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SmakAtak
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So many on here SLAM other coaches for telling players "you've gotta want it!"

Granted, in youth ball it is rarely accompanied by any actual coaching which is the real underlying criticism. Nonetheless, over and over I have seen that phrase isolated as a surefire tell that you're dealing with an inexperienced Daddy Baller.

So imagine my glee as I am reading the Drive Blocking section of Rick Trickett's book and there it is..."He has to want it. He has to want to whip this defender."

8)

"Has to want it" as an evaluation criteria seems logical.

"Have to Want it" as a motivation tool seems fruitless.  If they don't want it they don't want it.  You can't just TELL them they have to want it.  If you're a good coach, maybe you can MAKE them want it. 


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Test Account
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It is a real observation though. Some kids it is not ability. It is just attitude. We have at least a half dozen kids like this. All the ability, would take almost no effort for them to what is required,won't do ot., To this point

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


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patriotsfatboy1
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If you leave the phrase as "wanting it", then it is worthy of scorn. In this case, "it" was followed by explaining what "it" was. That is the key. Use the cliche, but explain what it means.

Saying "block somebody" is bad if that is all that is said. If you say, "you have to block somebody, starting inside out", then you might be coaching, for example.


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MHcoach
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G

I was always taught the most important part of blocking was desire. A player must want to block first. How & Who come next. In that order is how we teach blocking.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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CoachDP
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I was always taught the most important part of blocking was desire. A player must want to block first. How & Who come next.

Agree, 100%.  And to that end, successful O-Line coaches need to love coaching their linemen and offensive line play.  When I was coaching the O-Line during my first year at CHS, we lead the conference in scoring.  They were last in scoring during the previous year.  I asked my linemen what the difference was(?)  "You guys went from last to first!  What was the difference?"  They said, "You paid attention to us."  I always made it seem like every time I coached them, it was my preferred place to be, on the field.  Whenever I'd have to go to another group (there was only 2 coaches), I'd grit my teeth and say, "Man, I wish I could spend my whole practice over here with you guys."  I made them my priority.  As a result, they had desire to want to be there; to be part of this clique.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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jrk5150
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Like with most things we talk about, there are few absolutes.

2014 season, we're on the road, against a team that was pretty good and who had stomped us in a preseason scrimmage.  Physically they were every bit equal to us, if not better, although we had the best player on the field.  At the half I think we were down 12-6 or something like that, playing like crap.  My HC just blistered the kids, using every cliche that we roll our eyes at.  You're playing like loozahs (Boston accent), you gotta have haht, gotta want it, blah blah blah.  Parents were walking by us wide-eyed.  I'm just kind of off to the side looking around thinking we look like as*holes.

Then we come out and just handle them in the second half, ended up winning 26-12.  It's not like we made adjustments, the kids just played better.  How much of that was the halftime speech?  Dunno.  Would have to say quite a bit.


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MHcoach
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DP

I usually don't like to look back, but rather ahead. When the '94 team's highlights were posted, there was one thing that jumped out at me. The pad level of the Oline was really good. Sure we had a lot of players who could run the ball, but even better was the blocking. I think too often coaches lose sight of just how important the Oline is.

Joe

"Champions behave like champions before they're champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners"Bill Walsh


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CoachDP
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I think too often coaches lose sight of just how important the Oline is.

It's mentioned a lot by coaches, fans and commentators.  ("The game is won at the line of scrimmage.")  But finding guys who like/know how to teach it are much fewer and farther between.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
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How much of that was the halftime speech?  Dunno.  Would have to say quite a bit.

John, if that's the only time it worked, I'd doubt it was "the speech."  On the other hand, if he often found himself down at the half and after a speech you went out and won the game, then maybe it was.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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jrk5150
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John, if that's the only time it worked, I'd doubt it was "the speech."  On the other hand, if he often found himself down at the half and after a speech you went out and won the game, then maybe it was.

--Dave

Eh, who knows.  We didn't lose that many games in that stretch of time.  I do recall some other fiery half-time speeches, but not the context or results, frankly.  Maybe this one only stands out because we won.


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gumby_in_co
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Some kids it is not ability. It is just attitude. We have at least a half dozen kids like this.

That seems like the result of leaving things to chance. "Want to" is synonymous with "Mojo" to me. On a "Mojo" team, players are given no choice how to approach each and every rep. They are shown that it is fun to whoop someone's ass and that it is not fun to get your ass whooped. They are also shown that the team needs you to whoop ass on every play and NOTHING is more important than what the team needs.

So I see no problem with saying "You have to want it" if it's a key phrase whose meaning has been ingrained in your players. Same thing with "Block somebody", as long as that phrase is connected to a concept that they have already been taught.

One of the more profound things DP has said is "have a reason for everything you do".  We can argue scheme, technique, alignment, drills, splits  😉 , or a million other variables in our coaching decision tree. The important thing is to understand why each component is important to you, then invest the appropriate amount of time and effort to institutionalize it. If "want to" in your players is important, install it and rep it like you would your bread and butter play.

If you leave it up to the players to decide how much they "want it", then it must not be important. If it's not important, you can't complain about what they decide to give you.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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