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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4146
September 11, 2020 10:21 am  

Week 2 - already played 1 game.

This is a topic that used to come up on this forum a lot. Not so much anymore. Maybe because newer coaches and lurkers experiencing this challenge are hesitant to ask? Who knows. Mahonz' teams tend to be physical from top to bottom. 90% of that is the culture and atmosphere. We let our young little roosters strut around, challenge each other . . . simply be young men. We encourage and reward effort, aggression and toughness. We ignore whining, crying and complaining. Most kids take to this and immerse themselves in it. They love being part of the brotherhood and they know you have to carry your share of the load to be a part of it.

However . . . there are those that need some help and encouragement to get there. Getting these "soft" kids to find their inner beast has become one of my specialties. Their level of aggression fails to meet a certain baseline. I get them to that baseline and let the "system" take over.

I thought it might be fun to chronicle our efforts with 3 of these players. I missed 3 weeks of practice as a conscientious objector, filmed a scrimmage and participated in 2 practices prior to our first game, which we won 33-6 and broke the opponent's will. So I don't know what has been done from a team mojo standpoint in those 3 weeks. I don't really care. I would love to hear anyone's thoughts, ideas, questions, criticism . . . everything is on the table.

Here are our guys:

H:  2nd year player. Biggest player on the team and biggest player on most fields. Physical fitness is an issue. He is bright, friendly, loves football, loves the Outlaws and always has a good attitude. We made strides with him last season, then he got sick and missed something like 3 weeks of practice. When he came back, all that progress had gone away. This year, he's making progress. He's on several coaches' radars (mine included) and we are taking the approach of "push, push, encourage, encourage". E.g., "We know you can do better than that, let's try again." Last week, in close quarters tackle drill, he looked like he was trying to protect his hands, arms, chest and face as if his fingertips were the only thing impervious to injury. Last night, he was making contact with his shoulders and actually only missed 1 tackle in a 5 minute drill. In Friday's game film, he played 2 tech in the Killer Bee. The job is line up over the guard, when the ball twitches, hit the C in the pants and play football. For most of the game, he was double teamed by the C and G, which is a win for us although H was getting driven all over the secondary. His promise to the team last week was to make 2 tackles in the game. He got zero. The important thing is that this promise tells me he understands his position and wants to help the team.

P: Rookie. Decent size. Middle of the road athleticism. Seems unusually smart. Overheard from him on the sideline: "This is my favorite season ever!" Plays X receiver and DT. Seems coachable, but flinches at contact. My feeling is that with P, it's just a matter of getting him comfortable with being uncomfortable.

S: Rookie. Future hall of famer if we can unlock the beast. Big, tall, athletic, fast and smart. Would love it if this kid would be our QB in a season or two. Played Mike in our game and was largely a non factor. Does a decent job as a blocking back. When we give him the ball, he is either hesitant or makes a beeline to the sideline. Mahonz turned him over to me to play KB DE. Lined up over the TE, but slanted at the T and flexed off the line. Slam the T into the G and play football. Got him a ton of reps last night in half line defense vs scout O, then in full D vs scout O. Kid had a rough practice. He started out against probably the best blocker I've ever coached. It was very 1 sided, so I coached him during and after every rep with equal parts encouragement, technique and "now do it twice as fast". Had him and the OT switch places after he got "hurt". Best part of the practice was the OT telling him, "You're okay, S. C'mon. Pop up." while holding his hand out to him. Gave S a "break" at OT, then moved S to the other side of the D-line to go up against some smaller guys where he did much better. Still 50% of what I need from him and 80% of what he's capable of, but I guess that's why I have a whistle around my neck. All night, he complained about being cold, bruised and miserable. All night, I ignored him and told him how awesome he was going to be if we keep working at it.

Tonight is an offense night. I run the tackling station with the "bigs", so I will ask for S and P. H is already with me. I expect to lose my voice in that 5 minute drill. 

 

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17390
North Carolina
High School
September 11, 2020 10:44 am  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

This is a topic that used to come up on this forum a lot. Not so much anymore. Maybe because newer coaches and lurkers experiencing this challenge are hesitant to ask?

--It's not surprising when you consider that there's only about 7 people who read this forum. Regardless, this is a site to learn.  Who wants to read and ask questions when you can get immediate satisfaction from a Facebook Group.

Facebook Example:

Raiders Coach:  "How can I get some of my players to be aggressive?"

Coach Ted: "Y'ell at thme moor. We had a kid and he was a beaste."

Frilly Dilly: "Give em more laps."

NedAndJoan Wilkington: "You cant.  They whave to wont it."

Frankie Z28:  "Kid either have it or theyre dont. lol"

Jersies Coach: "We ran from a Spread! with their agressive kids."

etc., ad nauseum.

 

I thought it might be fun to chronicle our efforts with 3 of these players.

--Absolutely.  I'd be very interested to follow their progress.

 

My feeling is that with P, it's just a matter of getting him comfortable with being uncomfortable.

--That's a big part of it for any player.

 

All night, he complained about being cold, bruised and miserable. All night, I ignored him and told him how awesome he was going to be if we keep working at it.

--Thumbs up to you, Sir!

 

I expect to lose my voice in that 5 minute drill. 

--Get you a megaphone! lol

--Dave

 

 

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17390
North Carolina
High School
September 11, 2020 11:15 am  

And while there are certain ingredients that make up the "aggression recipe" (Whose Ball, Jack's Enduro, LTHS, Hit from Fit, Bullet Drill, getting players comfortable being uncomfortable, overtaxing the player physically while building him up mentally), it is more an art form and craft.  I can take a box of Duncan Hines, read the ingredients and regardless of how well I follow it, I know it won't turn out as well as it does when baked by the head chef at Panzano.  

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 22974
September 11, 2020 11:33 am  

"P" is most certainly looking for his comfort zone so Im throwing him in the deep end. I plan on playing him quite a bit at SG tomorrow so he is all yours tonight. Getting him involved in the mayhem should get him on that path. 

I expect "S" to bust out a little bit tomorrow once he starts making some tackles against our horrible opponent. 

"H"? Total mystery. 

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 22974
September 11, 2020 11:34 am  
Posted by: @coachdp
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

This is a topic that used to come up on this forum a lot. Not so much anymore. Maybe because newer coaches and lurkers experiencing this challenge are hesitant to ask?

--It's not surprising when you consider that there's only about 7 people who read this forum. Regardless, this is a site to learn.  Who wants to read and ask questions when you can get immediate satisfaction from a Facebook Group.

Facebook Example:

Raiders Coach:  "How can I get some of my players to be aggressive?"

Coach Ted: "Y'ell at thme moor. We had a kid and he was a beaste."

Frilly Dilly: "Give em more laps."

NedAndJoan Wilkington: "You cant.  They whave to wont it."

Frankie Z28:  "Kid either have it or theyre dont. lol"

Jersies Coach: "We ran from a Spread! with their agressive kids."

etc., ad nauseum.

 

I thought it might be fun to chronicle our efforts with 3 of these players.

--Absolutely.  I'd be very interested to follow their progress.

 

My feeling is that with P, it's just a matter of getting him comfortable with being uncomfortable.

--That's a big part of it for any player.

 

All night, he complained about being cold, bruised and miserable. All night, I ignored him and told him how awesome he was going to be if we keep working at it.

--Thumbs up to you, Sir!

 

I expect to lose my voice in that 5 minute drill. 

--Get you a megaphone! lol

--Dave

 

 

Frilly Dilly. LOL !!!

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4146
September 11, 2020 12:20 pm  
Posted by: @mahonz

"H"? Total mystery. 

Not a mystery. He has a disconnect between what he perceives and what is. Last night, he told me he watched 2 hours of film (which absolutely delights me). I asked him how he thought he did and he said, "I think I was aggressive."  

Okay.  

So I acknowledged his relative aggression compared to a week ago. Then, I challenged him to double it. He wasn't terrible in our angle tackle drill, which is a 150% improvement in a short time. 

I don't know how to change a kid's perception. I'll just keep asking more from him until we reach that "baseline", then let the culture take over. Marcos and I agreed to tag team H.  I'm the "good cop", LOL. 🤣 

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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32wedge
(@32wedge)
Silver Moderator
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 695
Virginia
Middle School
Only / Head Coach
September 11, 2020 12:36 pm  

@gumby_in_co

 

Just remember boot camp!

 

Push them physically!

Tell them to be an elite hitting machine they have to earn it!

Correct all mistakes!

Issue regimental punishment liberally!

 

Oorhah! Devil Dog!

 

 

 


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rpatric
(@rpatric)
Bronze
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 170
Maryland
6th - 8th
Head Coach
September 11, 2020 12:51 pm  

I think most importantly, make sure your players KNOW you care about them regardless of how gifted they are. The player with the least amount of talent needs to feel loved just as much as the superstar.

Once they know you love them without question, it's much easier to get them working at a level that is conducive to the result you desire.

If I make them do something difficult and make it suck, they will dread it every single time we do it. Conversely, if I make them do something difficult and show them unwavering emotional support throughout the process followed by praise for their efforts. They will be chomping at the bit for another opportunity to receive such a response. This creates aggressive play without any need for negativity.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17390
North Carolina
High School
September 11, 2020 3:46 pm  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

I don't know how to change a kid's perception. 

Perception of...?

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9393
Coach
September 11, 2020 6:07 pm  

Soft, fragile, needs more aggression...these terms about kids need to reflect on the coach first not the boy. 

I found aggression comes with confidence and confidence is learned over time. If you continue to get this kid comfortable hitting a bag first then hitting a person. He may surprise you in a game a few weeks from now 😉

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4146
September 11, 2020 6:16 pm  
Posted by: @coachdp
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

I don't know how to change a kid's perception. 

Perception of...?

--Dave

H's perception that he is playing aggressively. Since that's his perception, he sees no reason to do anything differently. So it's my job to keep challenging him to do more until he reaches our baseline.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17390
North Carolina
High School
September 11, 2020 9:05 pm  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

H's perception that he is playing aggressively. Since that's his perception, he sees no reason to do anything differently. So it's my job to keep challenging him to do more until he reaches our baseline.

Okay, I get ya.  

Our measuring stick of whether we're playing aggressively is simple and easy for all of our players to calculate.  Did the opponent get back on his feet?  And if so, how long did it take him?

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4146
September 12, 2020 10:37 am  

9/11/2020 Update

This was our pre-game practice, so no "mojo only" drills. I took those 3 players in my angle tackling drills with the bigs. I compressed the area to about 5 feet between the cones, emphasized violence and ramped up my intensity. A failure to hit means you go again against the same guy. Got a 30% improvement from all 3. I'm starting to wonder if S practiced the way he did Thursday because it was cold and he was miserable. If so, great, but that's a whole other problem since we can't control the weather and this is Colorado where it fully snowed for 2 straight days on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Got a pleasant surprise from P, who had been a WR and got a little work at DT. Mahonz moved him to short guard this week and turns out the kid can freaking block and enjoys it. 

Did heavy team O.

P got work at short guard and scout DT. No signs of hesitation or fear. The pilot light is on, now need to get the main burner going.

S was working at wing back where we just installed a toss series. He ran the ball more vertically and with more authority. Same thing with the pilit light.

H had the best practice I've seen out of him yet, including last season. Early in the team session, he beat his man, found himself face to face with the QB and fell down . . . purposely. I've seen this before. I quickly pulled him aside, really praised him for the effort then told him, "When you get to the QB, it's YOUR sack. YOU earned it. YOU deserve it. Believe in YOURSELF and take it." The next play, he sacked our QB, which is really a mixed bag. On one hand, we only have one QB, but on the other hand, H GOT A FREAKING SACK. I actually had to hit pause and coach up our starting C because he was struggling to handle H. The main takeaway is that H understands we need him to be physical and aggressive an that he wants to be physical and aggressive. I can always work with that.

I didn't do anything special and I'm not done. I have been positive, encouraging, supportive and boisterous with them. No one questioned their manhood, or insulted or embarrassed them. Big thanks to Zach who reminded me (8 minutes before I left for practice) that the key to aggression is confidence. Build confidence in little things, then add bigger and bigger things as the confidence grows.

Great week of practice all around. Fastest way to improve a team is to coach up the bottom.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17390
North Carolina
High School
September 12, 2020 1:07 pm  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

H had the best practice I've seen out of him yet, including last season. Early in the team session, he beat his man, found himself face to face with the QB and fell down . . . purposely. I've seen this before. I quickly pulled him aside, really praised him for the effort then told him, "When you get to the QB, it's YOUR sack. YOU earned it. YOU deserve it. Believe in YOURSELF and take it." The next play, he sacked our QB

Satisfying to see what good coaching can do.  

And it's amazing how much power and control we have as coaches to get the results we want.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17390
North Carolina
High School
September 12, 2020 1:08 pm  
Posted by: @gumby_in_co

Fastest way to improve a team is to coach up the bottom.

Staple this ^ on here.

And yet the majority coach from the top to the bottom, and then complain about the bottom.  Go figure...

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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