How long does it ta...
 
Notifications
Clear all

How long does it take to feel competent on game day?

Page 2 / 2

CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17877
 

If a coach wasn't on the field at the Super Shrimpie Smurf levels the games would never end.

Mike, I don't know what the Super Shrimpie Smurf age level is, but I don't understand why the games wouldn't end.  Are you saying that the kids wouldn't know where to line up?  Good grief, what are they doing at practice all week?

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
mahonz
(@mahonz)
Kryptonite
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 23169
 

Mike, I don't know what the Super Shrimpie Smurf age level is, but I don't understand why the games wouldn't end.  Are you saying that the kids wouldn't know where to line up?  Good grief, what are they doing at practice all week?

--Dave

Dave

Your Bucket List must include coaching 6 year olds someday. It is a ton of fun !

When you huddle up you can easily have a player in your huddle....from the other team !

Its mayhem.  🙂

Practice? Well....its not normal that's for sure.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


ReplyQuote
Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
Diamond
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 7700
 

I would equate coaching Bobble Heads to playing Chess with pieces that never stand still.  Hearding cats into a sack full of dogs.  ??? :'(

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


ReplyQuote
CoachRJ
(@rjohns99)
Bronze
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 296
Topic starter  

Part of my challenge this week was that we had a rain out followed by a BYE so we haven’t played for 3 weeks.

M, A,W – at least I am in good company

H – My assistants are coming around but we are all learning.  Me and my on field AC have in play assignments.  I forget mine most of the time and then forget to ask what he saw.  That’s one of the things I need to fix.  My sideline coaches are resp for subs, stats and MPP tracking.  I would have them watch bench side DE but I would forget to ask what happened. 

R – Being on the field is taxing but there is no way the game would look much like football at this age without it.  Some of them are still too needy as you mention.  I do get the feeling that by the end of the season, my first string will be able to run it without me.  Good list of failure points.  For us its whether the TE or BB remembers who to block, did the QB fit to wedge or take on the D by himself, did the lead blockers do any good.

H – All very good points and something I am working towards.  At 6 they are a herd of cats, especially when I start rotating (it does improve weekly).  I have 13 boys for 8 man ball with average attendance of 11 and the subs are no match for the starters even when I run half line.  Game sim is hard to achieve.  Practice moves along pretty good but I am working to get better at squeezing reps in.  I do run team O on air as a simulated drive down the field as fast as I can push them.  I am going to add a stopwatch to team skelly and challenge them to beat their record rep time.

Dave – We are no-huddle. Pre-play I walk the line to correct things, make blocking adjustments, remind the forgetful, then give the play to the QB. You also ask a good question.  The answer is both, to varying degrees if I understand the breakdown between administrative vs coaching.  I think of administrative to cover player assignment, game plan, pre-game, sideline, rules, etc and coaching to include play calling, adjustments, motivation, correction, etc.  The priority for what I want to get better at is recognizing breakdowns on the fly and getting the info I need for play calling.

"There's no system of play that substitutes for knocking an opponent down.  When you hit, hit hard." - Pop Warner


ReplyQuote
jrk5150
(@jrk5150)
Diamond
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 6431
 

To answer the original question, much like the other answers you've gotten, I'm in year 9, and still don't feel competent.

I've been with the same HC the whole time (he's in year 10 as a header), and we've worked through a lot of game day administrative issues - we do feel like we have a handle on the MPR strategy and in-game subbing, although we still aren't perfect with it.

But as far as game management, making play calls, etc., I am woefully inadequate.  I still call a bunch of plays early to "try them out" to see what will/won't work.  I feel like I'm just starting to comprehend when to call sweep vs. power, but it's still not a conscious thing.  I still don't think to read the perimeter triangle the way Jack Gregory teaches/does.


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17877
 

The priority for what I want to get better at is recognizing breakdowns on the fly and getting the info I need for play calling.

I think we all get better at it every year.  But when do we achieve "competence?"  I think it's when we really feel comfortable with the offense (or defense) we're running.  I used to carry a 3-sheet playlist with plays, formations, etc. for every situation.  Eventually, I didn't need the sheet to know what I wanted to do.  It was my scheme, my terminology, my adjustments, etc. and I felt very comfortable in how and when to make them.  At CHS, I'm starting all over again and I have to carry a sheet.  I hate carrying it. It's like relying on crib notes during a test.  That's why I encourage coaches to continue to learn about their scheme.  That's how you get good at it.  It's how you get comfortable.  It's how you achieve gameday competence.

--Dave   

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
COACH JC
(@winged)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 7000
 

Sound like your probably doing too much.  Just slow it down a little.  Breath.  Don't let too manh people talk to you. 

You'll often find me 20 yards or so away from everyone.  I need to see & think in quiet.  Then i'll come back to the group of coaches, relay some info and go back to 20 yards away. 

Your not gonna win the game on one play.  Mellow out.  It's a chess match remember?  Can you win a game of chess in one move?  No, you take your time, thing a couple steps ahead, then set up the big strike.  Same w/ football.  All it is is human chess.

It's all about having fun.  But losing aint fun!


ReplyQuote
Andrew76
(@andrew76)
Silver
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 572
 

Consider the NFL:  they have all the technology, time, money, and staff to do whatever they want, and still they make dumb decisions at least once a game.


ReplyQuote
CoachRJ
(@rjohns99)
Bronze
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 296
Topic starter  

Dave  - I can see how that would be very true for playing at a higher level and ties to a root problem for me as a beginning coach.  The more details that are second nature, the more thought cycles are available for processing what is dynamic.  In direct response to your point, I am confident with all 5 plays and 2 formations we run, when to call them and mostly what to correct when done wrong (A good thing about starting out with the little ones is that I only have to be smarter than a first grader in some ways).  I fight being overwhelmed with details and forget to do what I should be doing.

W - I think you hit it on the head with that.  I am going to change my on field AC during O.  He knows the O better than my #1 AC and can handle the alignment and placement issues.  This will let me step back for a few seconds and do counts.  He will also be better at identifying lead blocking issues.  My #1 AC is a great motivator and smells the D's weakness but doesn't know the nuts and bolts of the O.

A - That is a good point.  At each increasing level of play the complexity and number of data points to manage increase.

RJ

"There's no system of play that substitutes for knocking an opponent down.  When you hit, hit hard." - Pop Warner


ReplyQuote
Michael
(@michael)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 12890
 

When I coached the little dudes and was on the field, I wore a wrist coach with my depth chart on it.

It was a HUGE help for trying to figure out substitutions, especially when the ball went over.

And I gave wristbands to the players.  Something like black for O-Line, red for offensive backs, green for LBs and DBs, and grey for D-Line.  If you played one way, you had one wristband.  If you played both ways, you had two.  So if I had a problem on the field and had to sort it out fast, I could just yell, "Give me grey!" and the coaches on the sideline would send a kid in.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


ReplyQuote
CoachRJ
(@rjohns99)
Bronze
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 296
Topic starter  

M - Those are some very good ideas for next year.  I have 13 now but may have up to 24 next season.

Thanks
RJ

"There's no system of play that substitutes for knocking an opponent down.  When you hit, hit hard." - Pop Warner


ReplyQuote
JB
 JB
(@_jb_)
Silver
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 773
 

Part of my challenge this week was that we had a rain out followed by a BYE so we haven’t played for 3 weeks.

M, A,W – at least I am in good company

H – My assistants are coming around but we are all learning.  Me and my on field AC have in play assignments.  I forget mine most of the time and then forget to ask what he saw.  That’s one of the things I need to fix.  My sideline coaches are resp for subs, stats and MPP tracking.  I would have them watch bench side DE but I would forget to ask what happened. 

R – Being on the field is taxing but there is no way the game would look much like football at this age without it.  Some of them are still too needy as you mention.  I do get the feeling that by the end of the season, my first string will be able to run it without me.  Good list of failure points.  For us its whether the TE or BB remembers who to block, did the QB fit to wedge or take on the D by himself, did the lead blockers do any good.

H – All very good points and something I am working towards.  At 6 they are a herd of cats, especially when I start rotating (it does improve weekly).  I have 13 boys for 8 man ball with average attendance of 11 and the subs are no match for the starters even when I run half line.  Game sim is hard to achieve.  Practice moves along pretty good but I am working to get better at squeezing reps in.  I do run team O on air as a simulated drive down the field as fast as I can push them.  I am going to add a stopwatch to team skelly and challenge them to beat their record rep time.

Dave – We are no-huddle. Pre-play I walk the line to correct things, make blocking adjustments, remind the forgetful, then give the play to the QB. You also ask a good question.  The answer is both, to varying degrees if I understand the breakdown between administrative vs coaching.  I think of administrative to cover player assignment, game plan, pre-game, sideline, rules, etc and coaching to include play calling, adjustments, motivation, correction, etc.  The priority for what I want to get better at is recognizing breakdowns on the fly and getting the info I need for play calling.

RJ--

Building off of DP...

Keep things simple...that way...you're not fumbling for a play sheet on O or D. With your age---your O and D must be really simple, Bro. You must know what every player does every play, each step, their footwork, what they do with their hands, etc. Must know everything inside and out. It must be second nature.

That being said...you'll NEVER get to the point where you feel totally comfortable, but it will SLOW DOWN and things will get easier. Experience and keep it simple.

The better we get it seems, the simpler we are.

One thing that helps is to watch as much live football (i.e., youth, HS, etc.) as you can...it helps, ALOT.  😉

JB

"The big lesson in life, baby, is to never be scared of anyone or anything." Frank Sinatra


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2
Share: