Maybe I'm just a ba...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Maybe I'm just a bad coach  

Page 2 / 23

mahonz
(@mahonz)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 23024
 

This is not going to be a popular response, but sometimes your win/loss record IS a reflection on the talent you have rather than your coaching skills.

I know it sounds like a blame thing, but I used to beat myself up over losses.

I am struggling through a rough year myself, we are 4-4. We are not a talent-rich team and we got blown out yesterday. We are 1-2 players short of a competing against the best. I really need a DE and FB. I have tried several kids at both positions and coached them up, but the kids are young. Next year will be better.

Old

I will agree that speed matters. Tough to compete vs all comers without a little bit of speed somewhere. I also agree that you can be one or two players short of really busting out.

Jimmies and Joes do matter. The best coaches can place them properly. Something I still struggle with after all these years.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


ReplyQuote
Test Account
(@test-account)
Kryptonite
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 13421
 

Lots of times its not talent a team lack but maturity. The difference of a 1 year is enormous.

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17569
 

I know it sounds like a blame thing, but I used to beat myself up over losses.

I still do.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
Coach Kyle
(@coach-kyle)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 3826
 

  Yesterday, we lost 27-0 on a rainy, sloppy and muddy day. Our record goes to 0-5 with one game remaining. We've scored just 13 points all year, all in one game and that's been it, being shutout in the other 4 games. The boys showed flashes of brilliance in our second and third games, but it's been downhill ever since. I feel like I've been teaching the things that I need to, but it just seems that the kids won't/can't put it together. I do tackling stuff at every practice. We go over blocking. We run plays. I motivate, or at least try to. Granted, I've been uncomfortable with our schemes as I was put into this age level at the last minute and had to try to get something together quickly both offensively and defensively, and I'm still tinkering with it to find something we can execute.
  I'm kind of an excitable guy on the field, always yelling something. In practice, I don't like excuses and I can't stand when kids are not putting out any effort. I'm not the coach that goes grabbing facemasks on kids or rattling them like a doll, but I am extremely strict and will raise my voice when kids are fooling around and not paying attention or they don't execute their assignments. I don't downgrade or belittle the kids, but I will get in their face and then try to correct their mistakes. I've been reading a couple of Tony Dungy's books, but I don't think it's rubbed off on me yet. Last year, with an older team, we went 2-4, but executed really well. This year, it's been constant poor blocking and tackling. Maybe I am just a bad coach. Our record certainly indicates that. I'm obviously not doing something right. However, I haven't quite figured it out yet. I want to be a successful coach. I know that you're not supposed to measure success in terms of wins and losses. At least that's what Tony Dungy says. And to a degree, I believe that. I know that as coaches we are trying to give these kids other things besides football skills. But it seems that if you're coaching is even half-way decent, there should be some definite progress.
  So I guess a question that I want to pose is primarily to you guys who are successful in terms of wins/losses. There's a lot of very knowledgeable people on here who I respect greatly and have learned a lot from. But I'm sure that there was a time when you first started that maybe you were in my shoes where you just couldn't seem to put things together or get what you needed to out of your team and produce wins. How did you get from there to where you are now? This is my third year in coaching, second as a HC. What traits did you find that you had to develop to become successful? What were some of your bad traits that you had to get rid of and how did you do that? How did your coaching career evolve to where it is now?

I think the secrets to success are:
1) Make sure the information you get is coming from someone who is actually good at what they're telling you.
2) Seek out good people, and both learn from them and work with them.
3) Hold yourself accountable by figuring out and solving your problems.
4) Never make the same mistake twice.

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


ReplyQuote
ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9425
 

The number one job of a youth coach is to make them better players then when you first got them and provide an enviorment where the boys want to play the next season...we judge coaches in my org by retention of players and progression of skill and technique from game to game.

You focus on those things and youre a great coach

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17569
 

1. Mentors are important.

I am available.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17569
 

so what kind of coach am I?

Ill know in 30 years by how these guys treat their wifes, kids, parents and other people.

This.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
Coach Kyle
(@coach-kyle)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 3826
 

Old

I will agree that speed matters. Tough to compete vs all comers without a little bit of speed somewhere. I also agree that you can be one or two players short of really busting out.

Jimmies and Joes do matter. The best coaches can place them properly. Something I still struggle with after all these years.

Coaches can also make Jimmy and Joe better. I think that saying, "It's not the X's and O's, it's the Jimmies and Joes," is telling you to make Jimmy and Joe better, rather than teaching him all of your crazy schemes.

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


ReplyQuote
Coach D
(@coach-d)
Bronze
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 359
 

Great thread - Vince, the door you opened up by being humble on here has really been great and I appreciate reading through and collecting from the wealth of experience from all the coaches on here.  Really great stuff and something I think every coach has to go through. 

Please don't be offended but from reading your words Vince it sounded a little like you were unsettled or uncomfortable with the system you have in.  I think you said something about having to install it kinda fast or something.  Truthfully that could be a huge part of the issue I think.  Maybe I am wrong but from reading posts on here it sure seems that the really successful coaches (wins/losses) have systems they believe in and have taught comfortably for years and that within each system is the ability to flex it around the talent you have or don't have.  It took me 13 years ACing to put together a system I am comfortable with and now that I am HCing it has has made all the difference. 

Anyway - good luck and hopefully things will turn around.   


ReplyQuote
Vince148
(@vince148)
Gold
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2337
Topic starter  

Great thread - Vince, the door you opened up by being humble on here has really been great and I appreciate reading through and collecting from the wealth of experience from all the coaches on here.  Really great stuff and something I think every coach has to go through. 

Please don't be offended but from reading your words Vince it sounded a little like you were unsettled or uncomfortable with the system you have in.  I think you said something about having to install it kinda fast or something.  Truthfully that could be a huge part of the issue I think.  Maybe I am wrong but from reading posts on here it sure seems that the really successful coaches (wins/losses) have systems they believe in and have taught comfortably for years and that within each system is the ability to flex it around the talent you have or don't have.  It took me 13 years ACing to put together a system I am comfortable with and now that I am HCing it has has made all the difference. 

Anyway - good luck and hopefully things will turn around. 

Not offended at all. Yes, I was unsettled about the schemes. Even so, I basically kept the blocking schemes the same so it wouldn't affect the kids too much. Just changed the looks.

Once again, however, I want to thank each of you who responded with your encouragement and sage advice. It will certainly be an offseason of introspection. 


ReplyQuote
oldhatnewhat
(@oldhatnewhat)
Bronze
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 437
 

It will certainly be an offseason of introspection.

For most of youth coaches I think every offseason is. I am burnt out at the end every season--dealing with parents, kids who are late (who I make sit for part or all of the game), politics, starting players who miss games, scouting games, etc. And I need a couple months of no football to realize I want to do it all over again. Usually by February I am ready to focus on getting better, attending some clinics and pulling out my notes.

One thing that I think is helpful, though, is to write down the top 10 things you would like to do different next year.


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17569
 

I do tackling stuff at every practice. We go over blocking.

--Vince, not saying this is your issue but I see coaches in our org who everyday "teach" blocking and tackling, but do so with no expertise, rhyme or reason or established philosophy for teaching what they teach.  It is as if they "go over it," but without a specific reason for doing so.  I try to get them to look at what they teach and have a specific reason for doing so.  They need to know what they are looking for when they teach a player.  So many coaches have no idea what it is they are looking for when they teach. 

Be an expert on what you are teaching.
Know why you are teaching it.
Know how to get it from your players.
Teach efficiently.
Know what your "end result" is.  In other words, know what it's supposed to look like, once you've taught it.
Know the value of a specific drill.  Know what that drill will give you and whether it will deliver "bang for the buck."
You should never be in a situation that states, "Let's try this drill to see what happens."
Don't teach a drill simply for the sake of teaching a drill.  Know why you have chosen that specific drill over all others.
Make sure that drill fits within your scheme. (No reason to spend the bulk of special teams practice kicking deep, if you will kick-onside in the game).  I see so many guys waste practice time on stuff they don't run or won't use.  But my particular pet peeve is seeing them drill fundys without teaching the "why." I think they don't know the "why" either.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17569
 

I've been uncomfortable with our schemes as I was put into this age level at the last minute and had to try to get something together quickly both offensively and defensively, and I'm still tinkering with it to find something we can execute.

How are you uncomfortable with your schemes?  If you know your schemes, how are you not able to implement them at this age level, or why are you uncomfortable doing so?  I'm a Double Wing guy, and I'm going to be running the DW whether I'm coaching 7-8s, or high school kids.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
Test Account
(@test-account)
Kryptonite
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 13421
 

I am available.

--Dave

I think the thing that help me the most is that i saw physically those two men every day....going to work every day  and seeing them was big.... I dont think the results would be the same if it had been over the phone, or on a message board.....in fact I know it wouldnt have......Nothing against you, this board or any affilitiation of either.

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17569
 

Last year, with an older team, we went 2-4, but executed really well. This year, it's been constant poor blocking and tackling.

Vince, can you explain the former?  How does 2-4 translate to executing really well?  Just trying to understand what you see or how you are looking at things.

These past few weeks that I've been working in our youth org, I have found that their coaches don't see what I see, and vice versa.  It's frustrating to be asked for advice, give them advice and yet they still go back to doing things how they did it before.  It's as if they don't see, care or understand.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 23
Share: