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Prodigy
(@prodigy)
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October 29, 2020 12:47 pm  

Here's a relatively short and great article on leadership - worth browsing for anyone seeking to improve their own leadership:

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/7-harsh-truths-that-will-improve-your-leadership-skills-overnight?utm_source=pocket-newtab

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17458
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October 30, 2020 8:50 am  

He knows what he's talking about.  100% spot on.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Prodigy
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Posts: 2501
October 30, 2020 8:54 am  

So it's Friday and to help the day go by a little quicker, how about we have a little conversation about this article?  Here's my takeaway for the 7 items in this list, with my own real life examples:

 

1. good leaders will first pump the fear out of the room.

I suspect that more than anything, people fear the unknown.  How can you eliminate this fear?  with transparency.  Be open with your staff about the plans.  For the players, look at how CoachDP teaches tackling, he addresses the unknown and works backwards from there.  EDIT-->Also be open and forthcoming with parents.  Parent meetings etc.

2. good leadership doesn't happen without trust.

If we reference list item #7, leadership is about love.  You hear about this in war, where guys do not fight the enemy because they actually hate the enemy.  They do not fight the enemy because they love war or killing or because they love their country.  Usually it boils down to loving the guy next to you and you are watching each others' backs to get home safe.  Genuinely caring about someone is how you build trust.  This is all CoachDP CAL stuff here folks...which is a blueprint for success.

3. good leaders are willing to listen to feedback.

Something that was extremely valuable to me, my staff and the team was -- the first practice following our games, we had a team meeting where we discussed the good, the bad, the ugly of the game.  During this time we were looking for feedback from players as much as giving feedback to players.  We were looking to identify faults in what we were doing and seeking ways to improve. 

4. good leaders are positive, even when things go bad.

The first year that I was an assistant coach, more of a bag holder and babysitter than an actual coach, the header was extremely negative.  He had my 7 year old son crying and believing he was the worst football player in the history of the game.  What's more is that the other assistant started to take on a very negative persona and used nothing but negativity when dealing with the players.  The head coach sets the tone.  If the head coach is constantly negative, the assistants and players will be negative.  Negativity is not the way to breed any sort of success.  Imagine if you were trying to learn a new subject and the teacher was negative, you never got the right answer, you were belittled and demeaned for not understanding...you're probably not going to be very enthusiastic about learning that new subject.  Likewise, being positive is going to have a positive effect on the assistants and the players.

When things go bad, it's usually for two reasons.  If you're in a game scenario and you're losing, you're obviously not very well prepared.  The only person you should be upset with about this is YOURSELF.  Don't start being negative being you're losing.  It's your own fault.  Next, if a player makes a mistake, what value is there in yelling at the kid?  Do you know what I would tell at a kid who made a mistake?  "Shake it off."  We used the "shake it off drill" whenever a mistake was made.  Mistakes are there to teach you a lesson.  Learn from the mistake and work on improving and not making the same mistake twice.  If the same mistake happens over and over again, it's because you didn't teach it well, what you're doing is not sound (i.e. having a defensive player too far out of position to make the tackle), or because you have the wrong player in the wrong position.  These are all YOUR FAULT, nobody else's.  Do not get upset with players because of your own inadequacies and shortcomings.  BE BETTER.

5. good leaders rarely, if ever, procrastinate.

I'm not sure how applicable this one is for youth football.  I mean, great coaches are ALWAYS looking for opportunities to learn and improve.  They don't say "ohhhh it's a whole year before the new season starts, maybe I'll pick up some new tricks a few weeks before we start practice."  Great coaches are 365 days a year, always learning and evolving.

6. good leaders put strict boundaries on themselves.

For me, this is using delegation.  Sure you're the head coach and you should know everything that's going on with the offense, defense, special teams, players etc.  You need to be able to delegate.  I liked to give assistant coaches areas of responsibility:  you are good at coaching defense?  what defense would you run and why?  let me see it.  Ok, you install it and manage it.  In my opinion, this gives that assistant coach ownership, and somewhat frees me up to coach other points.  If you want someone to be the best version of themselves, you have to give them something they are passionate about.

 

7. leadership, in the end, is really about love.

 

Absolutely.  If you love what you're doing, if you love the kids you're coaching and your assistant coaches...you will be successful.  You'll want to be the best version of yourself that you can be.  You're going to be willing to go the extra mile to pull everything together.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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Prodigy
(@prodigy)
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October 30, 2020 10:14 am  
Posted by: @coachdp

He knows what he's talking about.  100% spot on.

--Dave

He's got 32+ pages of articles.  There may be some more gems in there somewhere:

https://www.inc.com/author/marcel-schwantes

 

 

 

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17458
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High School
October 30, 2020 12:22 pm  

1. good leaders will first pump the fear out of the room.

Here's my take on fear, as it pertains to coaching football.  Coaches are amongst the most fearful people I know, when it comes to competing.  How so?  First of all, I look at the preponderance of cheating.  Cheating isn't a result of competition.  If you are competitive, then you love to compete, win OR lose.  But the preponderance of cheating speaks volumes about those who are AFRAID to lose.  Then there are those who complain about their schedule and how the schedule-makers are against them.  They didn't get enough home games, or the arrangement of the schedule is poor.  Or they have to play too many competitive teams.  Or their own team should be in the B conference, instead of the A conference.  Or there are too many stacked teams in their conference.  Or the other team(s) got to pick first.  Or this dad made sure that the best players' dads coached on his staff so their talented sons would play for them.  On this site I read about, "We had to play this team that was bigger/faster/stronger/more aggressive/whose dad was in the NFL/whose team has gone undefeated the past X number of years, etc."  Then we get the "woe is me" story of how we're a team of have-nots.  Then there are the coaches who want to make sure their own team is in the such & such division so they have an easier road to the championship.  It's all based on the fear of competing.  "What if we have to play teams who are better than us?"  Then there are the chest-pounders who talk about how great their coaching exploits are, but simply because they were just lucky enough to have the fast kid.  They chest-pound so much that it becomes obvious they're doing so because they are relieved that they aren't a back-marker.  That's fear, too.  How can a coach who is fearful, set the proper example to his players about not fearing the competition?  He can't.  So if his team loses, not only does he cry about this own victimization, but so do his kids ("They won because they cheated!" becomes the excuse of not only the coach and the parents, but the players as well.). Fear fuels all of this.  So when children are raised by adults who fear, they become fearful themselves and make excuses about how the world hasn't been fair to them. I've got news for you.  Life isn't fair and the expectation that it should be only sets you up for great disillusionment.  Are the refs against you?  Yes, of course they are.  But they're against everybody, except themselves.  But that's another discussion, for another time...  

If I ever did write a book about football, what it would really be about is "fear."  Now make no mistake, I have a fear of failing.  But it's a fear that I could fail my players, parents, and org.  So I am motivated to do and give my best.  But I have no fear of competing.  As a matter of fact, I seek it out.

3. good leaders are willing to listen to feedback.

Because we had the Sunday Night Phone Call, the Parent Meetings, the Off-Season Action Plans (Pre and Post-season), where we as coaches met with players, parents, teachers and the administration it put us in the position to seek out feedback.  

4. good leaders are positive, even when things go bad.

I was at my toughest on our players, when we were ahead and were winning.  When we were (out)matched by an equal or superior opponent, I knew that a calm demeanor not only helped keep our players focused, but kept them confident.  I am reminded by the 2016 season when I was the header at GHHS.  We trailed in 7 of our 9 games, but went 8-1 on the season.  There were plenty of opportunities to fold up our tent and point fingers but instead we stayed the course.

5. good leaders rarely, if ever, procrastinate.

I just simply don't have time for it.  When I'm coaching, I have 72 hours of stuff that I'm trying to cram into a 24 hour day.  Give your coaches a battle plan, teach them how to carry it out, and follow up to make sure it was accomplished in the way you wanted.

 

 

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Prodigy
(@prodigy)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2501
October 30, 2020 2:38 pm  
Posted by: @coachdp

1. good leaders will first pump the fear out of the room.

Here's my take on fear, as it pertains to coaching football.  Coaches are amongst the most fearful people I know, when it comes to competing.  How so?  First of all, I look at the preponderance of cheating.  Cheating isn't a result of competition.  If you are competitive, then you love to compete, win OR lose.  But the preponderance of cheating speaks volumes about those who are AFRAID to lose.  Then there are those who complain about their schedule and how the schedule-makers are against them.  They didn't get enough home games, or the arrangement of the schedule is poor.  Or they have to play too many competitive teams.  Or their own team should be in the B conference, instead of the A conference.  Or there are too many stacked teams in their conference.  Or the other team(s) got to pick first.  Or this dad made sure that the best players' dads coached on his staff so their talented sons would play for them.  On this site I read about, "We had to play this team that was bigger/faster/stronger/more aggressive/whose dad was in the NFL/whose team has gone undefeated the past X number of years, etc."  Then we get the "woe is me" story of how we're a team of have-nots.  Then there are the coaches who want to make sure their own team is in the such & such division so they have an easier road to the championship.  It's all based on the fear of competing.  "What if we have to play teams who are better than us?"  Then there are the chest-pounders who talk about how great their coaching exploits are, but simply because they were just lucky enough to have the fast kid.  They chest-pound so much that it becomes obvious they're doing so because they are relieved that they aren't a back-marker.  That's fear, too.  How can a coach who is fearful, set the proper example to his players about not fearing the competition?  He can't.  So if his team loses, not only does he cry about this own victimization, but so do his kids ("They won because they cheated!" becomes the excuse of not only the coach and the parents, but the players as well.). Fear fuels all of this.  So when children are raised by adults who fear, they become fearful themselves and make excuses about how the world hasn't been fair to them. I've got news for you.  Life isn't fair and the expectation that it should be only sets you up for great disillusionment.  Are the refs against you?  Yes, of course they are.  But they're against everybody, except themselves.  But that's another discussion, for another time...  

If I ever did write a book about football, what it would really be about is "fear."  Now make no mistake, I have a fear of failing.  But it's a fear that I could fail my players, parents, and org.  So I am motivated to do and give my best.  But I have no fear of competing.  As a matter of fact, I seek it out.

 

great take.  I think that the author was really speaking to corporate leadership and such.  I know at my last job when a new IT Czar was appointed, people were really concerned about restructuring and whether they would have a job or not.  After this guy said "We are NOT cutting positions, we're actually going to expand"...and then went and fired some people, he had zero credibility.  Plenty of people took retirement and left for other jobs...myself included.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17458
North Carolina
High School
October 30, 2020 4:48 pm  
Posted by: @prodigy

I think that the author was really speaking to corporate leadership and such.  

 

I'm sure he was.  But this application is in regards to how can we use "leadership" as football coaches.  Well, we can't, if we're afraid.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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