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Playing time  


COACHDT
(@hawk2018)
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Joined: 3 years ago
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We have minimum playing time rules in our league. We have close to 30 kids on the team.

What systems do you guys use to keep track of playing time?

What do you do when your ACs don't make it a priority?

I coach in a rec league with dad coaches.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Mahonz is our header and playing time is his responsibility. He delegates to position coaches to manage it properly. What if a position coach doesn't make it a priority? It's never happened, but I'm pretty sure that coach would be fired. Our culture is that the team, the entire football experience belongs to the players. Based on the game plan, Mahonz will let the position coaches and the volunteer play counter know which kids will be flirting with minimum plays.  At half time, I will ask the play counter how certain kids are doing. Throughout the game, I keep these kids around me like baby ducklings around the mama duck. If a kid asks me to go in, I typically send him in because I like the attitude. Sometimes I pull him right back out because he did his own thing, but then, I fix hi and send him back. Lather, rinse repeat.

I coached O and D line last year and most of my players had a position on both sides of the ball. Those kids get plenty of plays. 2 played d-line only and 1 played o-line only. One of D-linemen started the season as an effective player and became very good by the end. The other was a lost cause (my specialty) at the beginning and became effective by the end of the season. The o-line only player is our center, but only in our "under center" offense. If we ran a lot of direct snap, I would be forced to play him on d-line.  Whether he played D or not, he typically got around 20 plays per game. Our minimum play rule is 15 plays. To me, that's a lot, but I still try to get them more. So the first d-line specialist, no problem. He often played the entire game (around 40 plays) at DT. 

The other one . . . a little more complicated. There were games where he only got 15 plays. Another aspect of our culture is that playing time is earned. On the days where he got 15 plays, that's all he deserved. There were 2 games where I left him in the entire game. Those are the games where I felt I earned my paycheck as a coach and the ones that I cherish. On one of my threads, I documented my efforts with this kid. He is "H" in the narrative. I spent a great deal of time with him to get him where he needed to be. He's one of my favorite players, even though he might be the worst football player on our team. He makes up for it with superior effort and attitude. 

[edit]

With 30 kids, I would certainly 2 platoon. Mahonz has written volumes on the subject and I have become a huge proponent of large rosters and platooning. Playing time is never an issue and by having each kid focus on one side of the ball, they get very good at their position. Then, your offense plays scout for your defense on D-Days and vice versa on O-Days.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by gumby_in_co

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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COACHDT
(@hawk2018)
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Topic starter  

@gumby_in_co

Awesome! I'm reading through Platooning posts now.  


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chucknduck
(@chucknduck)
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Joined: 8 years ago
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30 players = perfect roster for platooning

My experience has been that the assistant coaches will completely agree with platooning until you're in a close game or God forbid...

you lose. 

I will resign before I play 6 kids both ways and rotate 20 in the other 5 spots.

I've never had six quality coaches that show up everyday in order to practice like a true two platoon team.  So most of the kids learned both sides of the ball.  We always have some kids that are small and slow.  They practice at wr every practice with the qb.  We also get a lineman or two that are too slow to be effective blockers.  They have to go to the d line.  

Here's how it went last season....

On game day, our best 11 started of defense.  Defensive coordinators love platooning when you let them choose the best guys.  We had 10 guys start on offense that played no defense outside of some backup d lineman.  Our three starting lb'ers rotated at tailback.  Our backup wr's (defensive starters) came in on obvious passing situations.  

I usually coach an Air Raid offense using 4 wides all the time.  The Air Raid became a package with this team.  We were too slow at wr and our qb was the worst decision maker I have ever had.  We started the season as a spread team, but after an 0-2 start, we went to a two tight end /under center offense as our base.  

One thing I have learned is if you can turn your offensive line into a bunch of pit bulls, even with a subpar talent, you can run the ball.  If you can run the ball, you can get guys open with play action/boot passes.  We didn't lose again until the semifinals of the playoffs.

At the team banquet, the parents of the three least talented players pulled me aside and were extremely grateful for the amount of attention and playing time their kids received.  

I will always platoon as much as possible, regardless of the level I am coaching at.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Coyote
(@coyote)
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Posted by: @chucknduck

At the team banquet, the parents of the three least talented players pulled me aside and were extremely grateful for the amount of attention and playing time their kids received.  

That is a great feeling!  

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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Seth54
(@seth54)
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@chucknduck

 

what position did those little slow wide receivers play after you shifted to double tight?


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chucknduck
(@chucknduck)
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They were the starting X and Z receivers.  We were in a one back set.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by chucknduck

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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
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We have a min of 10 plays 25 or less kids, 8 plays 26-30.  I had 29 once quite a chore. 

 

It must be organized we had one assistant with offensive subs, and one with defensive subs.  All these subs and order of are pre determined during the week.  Based on this we had only 7 "starters" on each side of the ball at any given time. The min play count must be reached by 4th quarter or they must start the 4th and continue playing regardless of which side of the ball until plays are met. 

 

We only had the 4th quarter issue once in a tight playoff game and it was only 1 play I beleive. 

 

The hard part about our system is what if we don't get long sustained drives or the other team scores fast. We are down in score ect.  I was committed to all these kids contributing win or lose so to manage where these 4 spots were that had "subs" was tricky. 

 

That said in a good game we were done by beginning of the third quarter then we sub even more. Good meaning competitive within 10 or less points. 

 

Of the 4 spots say on offense as long as we had a 5+ play drive in first half, score or not we're done offensive subs by half. 

 

I can share our methods just know it's hard to go after the win most days by stacking your off/def unless you 2 platoon 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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coachgye
(@coachgye)
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On defense we try to platoon at most positions especially those where I can get away with some MPP.  Often we have three guys rotating on defensive line three plays at a time per position.  I stressed to them to show me something if you want to play more.  We I have had a 30+ I will have a back up offensive team of developing players and they would run mostly wedge and beast tank plays.  I always put them in the third series no matter what.


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