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Quarters Football Game / Teaching Toold


Coach Kyle
(@coach-kyle)
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I stumbled upon a great pre-season game which should help your players learn football.

You have an offense and a defense. You make up a big field, maybe 40 yards longs with 2 end zones. The offense starts in the end zone. The defense starts at the opposite endzone for kick off, and they can be on the LOS and move around during the downs. The offense huddles and hands a quarter to the kid who is going to be the ball carrier. Then they break the huddle and go onto the LOS. On "go" or cadence, the offense all try to run into the other team's endzone. The defense tries to tag them before they get there. The offense only gets points if the player with the quarter gets into the end zone. If the player with the quarter is tagged, they are "down", and the coach calls out 1st down after kickoff, 2nd down after 1st down ect, and the LOS is changed. The offense huddles and repeats for four downs. If you score, you get to do an extra point for one point, or whatever your league assigns points to. 

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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Coach Kyle
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So this worked out great. I did it with my team today. They had some confused faces, but most of them totally got it. It perfectly matched the flow of the game. the only thing I need to do is actually set up a bigger field.

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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Prodigy
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Posted by: @coach-kyle

So this worked out great. I did it with my team today. 

Worked out great in what regard?  If it's a skill you're trying to teach and you feel this drill or game does it, then use it.  Otherwise don't.

A brief story:  When I first took on a head coach role, I ran Dave Cisar's single wing.  I drank the Kool Aid, bought his videos and books and I learned a fair amount from it all.  Cisar was big on making football and drills "fun" and one drill he recommended for evaluations as well as rounding out practices was "Deer Hunter".  Where you basically cone off an area, put everyone in that area and choose "hunters" who have to tag anyone who is not a hunter.

It was said to be "great for conditioning".  So instead of running wind sprints or anything like that, I often would throw "Deer Hunter" into the mix.  It wasn't long before the young players were beginning to play "Deer Hunter" as if the only reason we were out on the field was to play this game.  I came to realize that this was a mostly pointless drill.  I don't think that it helps with conditioning because most football plays are less than 10 seconds long, I don't care if you can run around like an idiot for 10 minutes straight, I want 100% effort for 10 seconds at a time and training for this is different than training to run around for 10 minutes.  It might be semi useful to help kids to be evasive and such, but that's about it.  If we were training to play "two hand touch" or "flag football" it would be a much more valuable drill.

For the drill that you're proposing, I feel very similarly.  I don't want my entire offense trying to run to the end zone.  I want my offense blocking the defense and my runningback following and reading blocks.  I don't want my defense getting into the habit of trying to "touch" people when what they really need to do is hit.

When I decided to stop running playground-esque drills and really thought about what I wanted to do and why I wanted to do it, is when we became a very formidable team.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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Coach Kyle
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@prodigy When I say it went well, I mean it taught the kids the concept of kick off, kick return, the coin flip, the huddle, the line of scrimmage, manning up on defense, that you get four downs, extra points, out of bounds, and I get them thinking about how many downs they have left.

It's a teaching tool to help kids learn the game. I'm coaching 8/9 yr olds, and we cannot hit right now. We don't have pads on, and we aren't allowed to use footballs during this period.

Deaths while walking 4,743Deaths from football 12


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Prodigy
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Posted by: @coach-kyle

@prodigy When I say it went well, I mean it taught the kids the concept of kick off, kick return, the coin flip, the huddle, the line of scrimmage, manning up on defense, that you get four downs, extra points, out of bounds, and I get them thinking about how many downs they have left.

It's a teaching tool to help kids learn the game. I'm coaching 8/9 yr olds, and we cannot hit right now. We don't have pads on, and we aren't allowed to use footballs during this period.

I want you to be successful Coach.  I love the game, I love coaching the game.  By no means do I have all of the answers (I don't think anybody does really).  If you and your team got what you wanted out of the drill, awesome!  That's what is most important.

I coached kids as young as 5 with flag football and spent a great deal of time coaching 11 and under tackle teams.  

When we were in the "conditioning" phase, we ran plenty of hitting drills without pads and without footballs.  During the first several weeks of practice, we're running Michaels two line drill, or Potters tackling progression.  We're evaluating using three way tug of war, sumo, etc. as well as testing the intestinal fortitude of the players by asking them to dig deep during some physically demanding tasks.

Oddly...and possibly to my own detriment and the kids I coached, I never tried to explain or directly teach how the game of football is played...I mean, is it even really necessary?  Maybe.

The goal of the offense is to get a guy with a ball down the field and ultimately to the end zone.
The goal of the defense is to get the ball from the guy with the ball or at a minimum, stop him from moving towards the end zone.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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