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Single Wing- State Finals


davecisar
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Here in Nebraska
Finals in Class B- second largest class in state
FAR western hinderland team- Scottsbluff- who hasnt won anything makes it to finals undefeated
100% SIngle Wing- balanced formation
LOTs of 16 power, 18 sweep, 43 reverse
Then some fullback centric split flow plays- very similar to our buck series
NO wedge

When in spread- just like ours- very same plays
Rocket 28, Rocket 16, Rocket 15 counter, Lazer 47 etc

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


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davecisar
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They lost to Omaha Skutt Catholic- a perennial powerhouse
Scottsbluff was up 14-0 before losing it

Scored 575 pts in 13 games

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


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Coach Correa
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Out of the Sequence offenses the SW behind WT off course lol  Is still relevant in modern game and evolving theres very many ways you can go but still be SW  at core. I've seen some awesome stuff the last couple years from a variety of HS Coaches that looks modern but is rooted in SW all the way. I also believe everyone can curve someone with having a sneak attack SW mini series thats not expensive and can blend with whatever your core rules or assignments are.

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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Bob Goodman
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Here in Nebraska
Finals in Class B- second largest class in state
FAR western hinderland team- Scottsbluff- who hasnt won anything makes it to finals undefeated
100% SIngle Wing- balanced formation
LOTs of 16 power, 18 sweep, 43 reverse
Then some fullback centric split flow plays- very similar to our buck series
NO wedge

When in spread- just like ours- very same plays
Rocket 28, Rocket 16, Rocket 15 counter, Lazer 47 etc

Snapper's head is up.  I don't think he can snap to the tailback.  Looks like shotgun wing T.


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Coach Correa
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Alright Bob since you want to get technical yes it looks alot more like Tim  Murphys Gun Wing which is clearly rooted in Sw even better is you can run power with 2 different guys and have a read off it.

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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SingleWingGoombah
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Snapper's head is up.  I don't think he can snap to the tailback.  Looks like shotgun wing T.

I agree, always an argument with that offense, is it SW or DW.  If they are running a lot of 16 power, it is not very Murphy-esque though. 


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Bob Goodman
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I agree, always an argument with that offense, is it SW or DW.  If they are running a lot of 16 power, it is not very Murphy-esque though.

It's not primarily the number or placement of the wingbacks that determines the feel of these different offenses, it's the rhythm.  In this gun wing, or whatever you call it, you don't have the threat of 2 backs advancing on the snap at the same time.  The defense doesn't have to defend against, say, a 23 trap or a wedge at the same time the 1 back (or whatever you call him) is hitting in the opposite direction.

OTOH, take Hugh Wyatt's early version of his wildcat.  It's clearly a double wingback formation, has a lot in common with Markham's, but it often had one of the pair of quarterbacks hitting quickly forward on the snap while the other one's preparing to hand off, or whatever, in the backfield, so it combines the single wing rhythm with that of other systems.  It's like my system that combines single wing and wing T rhythms, but that's partly because of the backfield play and partly from the line play.

For that matter, shotgun single- or double-wing T has what to me is a different rhythm from a handed-snap wing T, because the fullback's doing different things, as is the QB.

Let me ask this: Were they parting the seas at the line, the way we think of in single wing and in Markham-style (or even more so Calande-style) double wing?  Or were they combining "on" blocking with some cross-blocks and folds, as we tend to associate with wing T?


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