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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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September 7, 2012 7:14 am  

Not what I do.

TT

Do you pump up individually?

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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CoachOCD
(@coachocd)
Platinum
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 4144
September 7, 2012 7:15 am  

Does anyone keep some motivational speeches in their back pocket (figuratively) that they pull at when needed. I could use a few. If you have them of know of some good youtube videos worth mimicking, I'd like to know. I love the Ali v Ernie Terrell "What's my name?" speech.

Thanks.

No BUT I gotta cringe everytime the high school game of the week shoves a camera in the face of a HS coach when he is addressing his team prior to game...........You can see some like the camera a show off in front of it, and then the sphinkter shrinking coach that studders and stammers (gets nervous) in front of camera...this guy I feel for....NO PRESSURE just everyones watching and recording this...NO PRESSURE AT ALL!!


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coachgt
(@coachgt)
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September 7, 2012 7:19 am  

Thanks coaches. As always, you've provided great insight

If you are not with us, then by definition, you are against us.-Magneto


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Test Account
(@test-account)
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September 7, 2012 7:19 am  

TT

Do you pump up individually?

I praise right and success? Which is far more effective than rah rah which they can see right through.

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


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Loftdawg
(@loftdawg)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 82
September 7, 2012 7:20 am  

I don't have a stock speech but I did use Mahonz's "Rope" idea the last practice before our first game.

We have been preaching team since day 1 in lots of ways but wanted to pull it all together before the first game. So after our final walk through, while eating pizza together, I told my guys that when I was their age, the coaches always talked about chains only being as strong as their weakest link and not to be the weak link. I told them how much I hated that analogy because I was sure they were talking about me. Told them it turned me into a fearful player, not afraid of the other team, afraid to let my team down which made me play tight.

I said the problem with chains is that when you put stress on it, when you pull on the chain, the links pull against each other. WE will not be a team that pulls against each other.

I then pulled out a rope and explained that the reason rope is stronger than chain is that the individual fibers, none of which are stronger than a link, all work together. That when you pull the ends of the rope, the rope pulls tighter together, supporting each other.  I finished that our team would be STRONG LIKE ROPE. and then we took pieces of the rope and taped them to the groove in their shoulder pads.

We won our first game 36-18 and our 3rd and 4th string beat a team in a JV game this week that allowed their first string RB to play a majority of the snaps. When we congratulated the team on that accomplishment, one of the players yelled out - We're strong like rope coach.

That brought a smile to this coach's face.

Thanks Mahonz for the idea. It's a great one.


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PBTide
(@pbtide)
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September 7, 2012 8:21 am  

I rip this off every chance I get:

"If you throw the football, four things can happen and three of them are bad.  It can be incomplete, it can be intercepted, or somebody might shoot your receiver from the stands." - Coach Paul Bryant


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Michael
(@michael)
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September 7, 2012 8:29 am  

I'm not big on speeches, but I have referenced this with adults.

It's Ed Reed, at halftime against FSU, after separating his shoulder in the first half.

Basically, "Stop asking me if I'm all right.  No, I'm not all right.  I'm hurt.  But I DON'T CARE!"

One of my former athletes called me a few years ago before a big competition, and said she wanted a story, so I gave her that.  Apparently, her gang liked it.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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September 7, 2012 8:46 am  

Our staff is not big on speeches. Once the ball is kicked off all that goes away and the kids emotions are dictated by the events of the game. You want to tire your kids out go ahead and get them jumping all over the place before the game. I want our kids calm and focused on football not some "One for the Gipper" speech. Motivational speeches are temporary and quickly forgotten along with the energy they bring. We do talk to them a few times each week at practice about hard work and commitment and how games are won during practice not on Saturdays. This constant reinforcement is important and more lasting. We just tell them that they have worked hard so go out kick some but and have fun. I am sure some psyche major will tell me we are wrong. We still keep doing what we do. I learned that calming oneself and focusing on the task at hand is much more effective when I wrestled. It greatly improved my performance.


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coachdoug
(@coachdoug)
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September 7, 2012 8:47 am  

I don't do a lot (okay, I don't do any) rah-rah pregame stuff.  I generally let the players do that stuff on their own.  I do however, have story night once a week, and the kids really seem to like it and get something out of it.  Once a week, generally in the middle of the week, I end practice just a few minutes early and in our post-practice team talk, I'll tell them a story with some message that reinforces one of the character development traits were trying to build.  Most of the stories have to do with persistence, never giving up, and always giving 100%, but there are a number of other messages as well.  This season I've used the following stories (some true, others more fable):

  > Paul Hofer (1976 49ers)
  > Nuggets of Gold (parable of ancient family that seeks advice from a wise man before moving - wise man says I'll give you advice that you won't understand, and that you won't follow completely, but you'll wish later that you had followed it better.  Then he tells them to go to a certain river, collect as many rocks from the banks as he can fit into a certain bag and take them with him on his journey.  The family does so, but after a while the rocks get heavy and they dump some out - this happens a few times.  After they are moved and settled into their new home, they remember the rocks and get a good laugh at how stupid it was to listen to the old wise man and carry those heavy rocks all that way. So, they go looking for the rocks and when they find them, the rocks have all turned to solid gold.)
  > Story of my 2009 team, which had 5 come-from-behind victories.  Great message about poise.
  > Abraham Lincoln
  > Time Management Expert at Harvard Biz School who puts rocks, then gravel, then sand, then water into a bucket, asking the students along the way if the bucket was full.  Most students think the lesson is that no matter how busy you are, you can always squeeze more in, but the actual point of the exercise is that if you don't put the big rocks in first, you'll never get them in at all.
  > John Stevens Akwari (marathon runner from Tanzania, 1968 Mexico City Olympics)
  > Cliff Young, Austrailian ultra-marathon runner

Other stories that I will use later this year or have used in the past include:
  > Story of a guy who fell off a cruise ship and woke up alone in the ocean.  He thought about letting himself drown, but changed his mind and miraculously was rescued.
  > The mouse (or pick whatever small animal you prefer) that fell into a bucket of cream.  His buddy gave up and drowned, but he just kept swimming until the cream turned to butter and he was able to walk out.
  > A story about one of my games from my HS career (big come-from-behind victory)
  > Brandon Denker - one of my former players who, at one point, was a essentially a minimum play player for us, but is now playing at the Univ of Arizona for Rich Rodriguez and will probably be the starting QB there next season.
  > L.A. Dodgers '88 World Series.  Everyone knows about Kirk Gibson's heroic home run, but do you know who was at bat before Gibson and what he did?  He name is Mike Davis and he drew a 2-out walk, allowing Gibson the opportunity to get to bat in a situation that could win the game.  Drawing a walk may not seem all that glamourous, but what Davis did was every bit as important was what Gibson did - without Davis's walk, there would have been no Gibson HR.  Great message to send to your MPP or role players.
  > Pull The Rope
  > Thomas Edison
  > Kurt Warner
  > Lombardi Packers (take your pick of about 10 stories)

I have a bunch more, but that's all I can think of right now.  The kids get good character development messages and they really enjoy hearing the stories.  I always ask them why I told them that story when I'm done and it's interesting to hear what the kids got out of the story - sometimes they really impress with an insight from the story that I had even thought of. The whole thing usually only takes about 5 minutes.

Video clips: www.youtube.com/footballcoachdougFacebook Page: www.facebook.com/footballcoachdoug


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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September 7, 2012 8:50 am  

I praise right and success? Which is far more effective than rah rah which they can see right through.

TT

My son has a unique gift and I dont really know how he maintains all that energy. 

It is constant rah rah and constant speech even when he is coaching technique.

The kids really do respond well. They quickly learn that he is their biggest fan and will fight tooth and nail for him. Coach Gumby coached with him last season and gave him the nickname Chernobyl.

That fits. Some of our best football friends now have come from opposing teams over the years. They always looked forward to the game they got to play that insane coach. He is quite a character and its constant. After a couple of season the entire division gets to know my son and its always good.

We are coaching a new team this year and I always worry about how the parents will react to him. Our TB / MLB is quite the little football player. Practice number one his Mom sends Dad a text. All it says is she doesn’t think this is going to work out. Last Friday at our after party she admits this. Her son is so enamored with football and his HC she is absolutely blown away.

Its only been a month.

So rah rah has its place IMO. I have seen a lot kids buy in over the last 10 seasons or so. Probably has to do with the orator though. 

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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Michael
(@michael)
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September 7, 2012 8:51 am  

> L.A. Dodgers '88 World Series.  Everyone knows about Kirk Gibson's heroic home run, but do you know who was at bat before Gibson and what he did?  He name is Mike Davis and he drew a 2-out walk, allowing Gibson the opportunity to get to bat in a situation that could win the game.  Drawing a walk may not seem all that glamourous, but what Davis did was every bit as important was what Gibson did - without Davis's walk, there would have been no Gibson HR.  Great message to send to your MPP or role players.

I like the Hershiser story from that World Series.  After the game, a fan yelled, "Hershiser, you're lucky."

Hershiser replied, "Yeah?  Grab a bat."

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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coachstu
(@coachstu)
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September 7, 2012 9:03 am  

The most effective speech I ever gave was to get the roster of our opposing team, our arch nemesis who had beaten us 4 times the previous two years by an average of 30+ points and to go over their roster with our kids.  I went player by player from the opposing team's, roster, matching him up with a corresponding player on our team.  We'd give each opposing player a silly nickname, or otherwise insult him and I would ask each kid..."Is Toby 'Puddin' Vanderputz better than you?...Tougher than you?...Does 'Puddin' scare you?"  Of course, the answer was no.  And as a team, we laughed like crazy.  We spent almost an hour doing that.  It really humanized the other team and lowered them from the level of beasts that could not be beaten to the level of school house nerd.

That Sunday, we finally beat that team.  8-0.  For the championship.  The kids went crazy as did we coaches.  My favorite coaching moment by far.  One I'll never forget.

That tactic did get back to the opposing coaches that were none too happy about it.  But, whatever....scoreboard.


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seeindouble
(@seeindouble)
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Posts: 1590
September 7, 2012 9:11 am  

The most effective speech I ever gave was to get the roster of our opposing team, our arch nemesis who had beaten us 4 times the previous two years by an average of 30+ points and to go over their roster with our kids.  I went player by player from the opposing team's, roster, matching him up with a corresponding player on our team.  We'd give each opposing player a silly nickname, or otherwise insult him and I would ask each kid..."Is Toby 'Puddin' Vanderputz better than you?...Tougher than you?...Does 'Puddin' scare you?"  Of course, the answer was no.  And as a team, we laughed like crazy.  We spent almost an hour doing that.  It really humanized the other team and lowered them from the level of beasts that could not be beaten to the level of school house nerd.

That Sunday, we finally beat that team.  8-0.  For the championship.  The kids went crazy as did we coaches.  My favorite coaching moment by far.  One I'll never forget.

That tactic did get back to the opposing coaches that were none too happy about it.  But, whatever....scoreboard.

;D Good one.


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coachgs
(@coachgs)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 1238
September 7, 2012 9:37 am  

So rah rah has its place IMO. I have seen a lot kids buy in over the last 10 seasons or so. Probably has to do with the orator though.

That is what makes it work or not. Who gives the speech and how it is given. Especially when there is already a relationship between the player and the coach.

"Character is formed, not by laws, commands, and decrees, but by quiet influence, unconscious suggestion and personal guidance." - Marion Burton -


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davecisar
(@davecisar)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7679
September 7, 2012 9:44 am  

Back when I played HS ball- our coach did some of that fire and brimstone stuff- no one took it seriously. All that wears off the first time you get hit. In college- never had anyone do any rah rah inspirational type stuff.
I know Osborne is not a fan of it.

The hay is in the barn, just go out and play

Leave the theatics for the desperate

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


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