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coachgye
(@coachgye)
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Joined: 8 years ago
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May 5, 2018 6:59 am  

Our football league started out as the city rec league before becoming one of the associations with in the larger state organization.  Often we are still registering 2 or 3 weeks before the start of the season but are trying to be more efficient in the registration process so we can have ample time to get each team ready.  For example, last year we had 8 practices before our first game.  There were 5 full equipped and 3 in just shorts and shirts before that.  We were really lucky that the season was pushed back a week due to weather which in turn gave us time to get in 3 more practices.  We still did okay in our season and did make the playoffs.

What I am looking for are ideas on how to implement a successful pre-season progam.  Things like assessing speed, gaining strength/speed, fundamentals, conditioning, etc.. in short period time.  Also things like when you guys typical start and what type of drills or team building tools you use to get ready for the season.  Anything you are willing to share would be useful.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17478
North Carolina
High School
May 5, 2018 7:43 am  

I think the most important question is when are you allowed to start?

—Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Posts: 9406
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May 5, 2018 8:07 am  

Assesing speed...theyll be slow... they always are... a hand ful of multiple sport athletes will be ahead of the curve.

How do you gettem up to mid season shape in pre season...well thats the million dollar question...

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17478
North Carolina
High School
May 5, 2018 9:51 am  

What I am looking for are ideas on how to implement a successful pre-season progam.

Pre-season is the same as off-season.  If you can go year-round, then no problem.  The question then goes to, "Do you want to?"

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
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May 5, 2018 3:41 pm  

Things like assessing speed, gaining strength/speed, fundamentals, conditioning, etc.. in short period time.  Also things like when you guys typical start and what type of drills or team building tools you use to get ready for the season.  Anything you are willing to share would be useful.

Ill try to provide some insight as i wait for my table to be called.

I dont assess speed , youll see it with your eyes and dont need combine like assesments, in youth anyway.

We start with a small dynamic warm up... distance set is 10 meters.

Low kicks to high kicks.
Low knees to high knees.
Narrow steps with a small sit down to wide steps with a very low sit down.
On one leg, swing the other to the side at increasing angles.
10 hand release push ups
10 deadbug sit ups

Then we go push the sled, we have a five man so with avg of 20 people thats 4 waves, each push last 5 secs for about 8 sets

Thats our preseason, no pads gpp or physical conditioning before we go into more football stuff.

We build on this, we add 2 reps each day to push ups n deadbugs, and 2 secs on each push until we hit 12 secs.

In between football drills we do something similiar to dp's circle of death. We do plyo jumps, push ups, sit ups, static hold in squat/3/4 point stance,  this lasts about 10 minutes... we dont stop and only 1 coach gets a squirt bottle to give water to worthy players.

Our football drills are small groups in constant movement, we let kids take water when ever, just dont make us wait when its your time to go in a drill. If you do your group does some form of exhausting exercise as you stand there and count, frowned upon but effective.

We have races randomly im practice to try m find speed. We linem all up and run 5 sprints. We tellem to show how fast they are, this way they focus on trying to win the race and not worry bout being tired. We givem 20 secs between sprints also.  We write down the kids who are consistently in top 5, so 3 out of 5 will get you on the list. We vary also with sprints from the belly, back, facing away, and what ever else we can come up with. We also do bear crawl races a lot to look for coordination.

Dont know if any of this will help, our focus is to constantly push competition amongst the players. We wanna see them do their best more then dog it. We usually are ahead of the curve physicallity wise im weeks 1-3 as these gpp things dont stop because we are inbseason.

Tables ready , peace!

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17478
North Carolina
High School
May 6, 2018 10:38 am  

If you do your group does some form of exhausting exercise as you stand there and count, frowned upon but effective.

Zach, what part is frowned upon?

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
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May 6, 2018 10:43 am  

Zach, what part is frowned upon?

--Dave

The culprit counting while the team exercises. Least from what ive been told...its  demeaning and bullying apparently.

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17478
North Carolina
High School
May 6, 2018 10:55 am  

The culprit counting while the team exercises. Least from what ive been told...its  demeaning and bullying apparently.

Interesting, because that's our de facto approach.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
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May 6, 2018 3:07 pm  

Interesting, because that's our de facto approach.

--Dave

Its no doubt effective,  my parents are very "sensitive"

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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MBCoach
(@mbcoach)
Copper
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 63
May 7, 2018 4:46 pm  

Its no doubt effective,  my parents are very "sensitive"

Sounds like it’s time to hold a parent meeting with some retraining involved.

I tell all my parents that unless we’re cursing at your child, putting hands on your child, or allowing the kids to do either of those things to your child, I don’t want to hear it. Period. If that means you pull your kid, go for it. There’s 29 other players who will enjoy the increased playtime.


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
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May 8, 2018 5:10 am  

Sounds like it’s time to hold a parent meeting with some retraining involved.

I tell all my parents that unless we’re cursing at your child, putting hands on your child, or allowing the kids to do either of those things to your child, I don’t want to hear it. Period. If that means you pull your kid, go for it. There’s 29 other players who will enjoy the increased playtime.

I only have 1 usually...and almost 100% of the time im told about it and it wasnt even their kid.  I handle it then and it becomes a non issue after.

We only have 1 or 2 slow on the uptake kids when they hear get water when ever they take advantage until...this happends then we move on

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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Prodigy
(@prodigy)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2502
May 9, 2018 6:33 am  

I dont assess speed , youll see it with your eyes and dont need combine like assesments, in youth anyway.

I always run assessments, even when I have a pretty good idea of what to expect.  Why?  A couple of reasons: First, our assessments are an opportunity to compete, so we're able to assess not only whatever particular attribute we're trying to identify, but also the "fight" in the participant and desire to win, how they handle winning and losing.  Secondly, it's a matter of fairness; giving every player an opportunity to show what they have and "try out" for various positions...with assessments every player is able to see who are the fastest players on the team, who are the strongest on the team etc. and they begin to understand where they fit in without me or any of the other coaching needing to explain it.  Next, it's a chance to be surprised at the results; it's rare but sometimes a kid that you least suspect will possess speed, agility, strength etc. that you did not anticipate.  Finally, the kids have fun with it and gain some level of conditioning both mentally and physically from assessments.

With that said, I don't use a stopwatch, competing against a stopwatch is different from competing against a teammate.  Also, all things are relative.  If I've got 30 kids on the team, I want to know who the fastest kids are.  I don't care if they are "fast" compared to other kids in the United States for their age group or even if they are "fast" compared to other kids in the conference that we play against.  Fact is, you've got what you've got...you take what you've got and make it the best that you can.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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MBCoach
(@mbcoach)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 63
May 10, 2018 1:57 pm  

I always run assessments, even when I have a pretty good idea of what to expect.  Why?  A couple of reasons: First, our assessments are an opportunity to compete, so we're able to assess not only whatever particular attribute we're trying to identify, but also the "fight" in the participant and desire to win, how they handle winning and losing.  Secondly, it's a matter of fairness; giving every player an opportunity to show what they have and "try out" for various positions...with assessments every player is able to see who are the fastest players on the team, who are the strongest on the team etc. and they begin to understand where they fit in without me or any of the other coaching needing to explain it.  Next, it's a chance to be surprised at the results; it's rare but sometimes a kid that you least suspect will possess speed, agility, strength etc. that you did not anticipate.  Finally, the kids have fun with it and gain some level of conditioning both mentally and physically from assessments.

With that said, I don't use a stopwatch, competing against a stopwatch is different from competing against a teammate.  Also, all things are relative.  If I've got 30 kids on the team, I want to know who the fastest kids are.  I don't care if they are "fast" compared to other kids in the United States for their age group or even if they are "fast" compared to other kids in the conference that we play against.  Fact is, you've got what you've got...you take what you've got and make it the best that you can.

I pretty much agree, with the exception of the stopwatch. I do time the kids at 10, 20, and 30 yards, 3 cone, at both the beginning and the end of the season. I like it because I can show the kids measureble statistics as to how they got faster through the football season. It also gives me facts to show a parent that, no, johnny isn’t just as fast as the RBs.


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9406
Coach
May 11, 2018 5:35 am  

I pretty much agree, with the exception of the stopwatch. I do time the kids at 10, 20, and 30 yards, 3 cone, at both the beginning and the end of the season. I like it because I can show the kids measureble statistics as to how they got faster through the football season. It also gives me facts to show a parent that, no, johnny isn’t just as fast as the RBs.

But do they get faster?

When parents mention their kid and running back vs this rb... i ask them if their kid can beat that kid in a game of roughhouse to 10.  They say thats not football, i say i need more than speed 😉

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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MBCoach
(@mbcoach)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 63
May 11, 2018 6:29 pm  

But do they get faster?

Most do, yes absolutely. If nothing else because they’re 6 months further in their physical development, and at my age level that’s a big difference in testosterone levels with most kids. But they don’t know that.

Realistically, I have about 10-15 kids who I see year round, train in the offseason, and those kids really only see a marginal improvement from a season of football. Some of them work HARDER in the offseason than they do in practices, just because in the offseason they’re going 5-6 days a week between the other sports they play and a workout or two with me. But the other 2/3rds of the team have a huge improvement. They spend the offseason playing baseball, Xbox, really any slew of things that aren’t nearly as physical as our practices.


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