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Geoketc
(@geoketc)
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This has been my first year coaching middle school football. Our school is the smallest both by size and numbers. My O line isn't big enough to stop a rush. Every team we played rushed 8 and we could never get off a play. Most of the time a defender was about to get the ball about the time the quarterback did. How do you design an offense against bigger, larger teams when you can't block?


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Dimson
(@dimson)
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Teach them to block better.


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chucknduck
(@chucknduck)
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Joined: 8 years ago
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Air Raid was designed for the problem you're having.  A great screen game and a quick passing game.  Qb has to be coached to get the ball out in under two seconds.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Teach them to block better.

Chris, you're a lot of help.  lol  ::)

What blocking scheme are you using?

Successful blocking is less about size and more about knowing who to block/how to block/why to block.  Smaller players can still get leverage by getting underneath an opponent's pad level, or by blocking him down, or out.  If you're base-blocking most of your plays, then that is usually the most challenging for an offense, unless you are bigger/stronger/meaner.

Also, what is your offensive scheme?  Your profile says "Double Wing." Many here would be able to point you in the best direction for your particular offensive scheme.

The answers are here; keep asking the questions.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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What are are you located?  There may be someone on the forum who is local and is glad to help.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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Teach them to block better.

Yup. Recess the line back as far as legal. Tighten splits. Teach the oline to cut. Run trap all the time. Run jet all the time. Run rocket all the time. Block better. Quick passing game. Play really good defense and special teams.

I think the first thing the op needs to do is stop trying to design an offense. Run something with proven results where all the questions have already bern answered. Then get a really good oline coach who loves technique. Or learn oline play inside and out himself. I can tell you technique alone won't do it if they are absurdly overmatched. It will close the gap some but won't make a dominant oline. So get as good as you can tech wise, recess the oline, tighten the splits downs a bit and run an offense that is good at streching the field. Run screens.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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This has been my first year coaching middle school football.

--As an AC, OC or HC?  It would be helpful to know where you are in your learning/coaching development.

My O line isn't big enough to stop a rush.

--Any o-line can stop a rush, provided it's coached properly. That's knowing your offensive scheme, the drills to teach the offensive scheme, knowing how to teach those drills, knowing your blocking scheme, the drills to teach your blocking scheme, knowing how to teach those drills, and knowing your priorities (feet are a fundamental priority for us.  I want guys who are mobile, which is why I don't put much stock in size/strength at the youth/middle school level).  Middle school kids aren't spending much time in the weight room, nor do the have year-round programs so I'm not putting much focus on that.

Every team we played rushed 8

--If you don't block, it probably wouldn't have mattered if they'd rushed only one.

and we could never get off a play.

--What did the HC or OC say about what they thought the reason was?  What do you think the reason was?  Do you think it was simply a size/strength issue?

How do you design an offense against bigger, larger teams when you can't block?

--Don't design one.  Good offensive schemes have already been designed for you.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Dimson
(@dimson)
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If you can't block, you have 2 choices. Get really good at the quick/screen game or teach them how to run wedge and run it every play. If you can't wedge, well you really screwed then.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Recess the line back as far as legal. Tighten splits.

--Yes.  Certainly if you're running the Double Wing.

Teach the oline to cut.

--Only if you're QB's under Center.  Doubtful that the refs will give you that if you're in Pistol or Gun.  Know your league rules; we moved away from cutting because officials flag us for it.  I've got other battles...

Run trap all the time. Run jet all the time. Run rocket all the time.

--If penetration is an issue, Trap could well be your best friend.  And since many middle schools don't run Trap, it's likely that they won't know how to defend it.  Jet and Rocket could get your Backs out of town before the bad guys show up.

Quick passing game.

--Screen game could be killer here.

Then get a really good oline coach who loves technique. Or learn oline play inside and out himself.

--Yes, it's all about priorities.  If you want a great o-line, then that has to be your coach's priority.  Nobody is good at anything by accident.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
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If you can't block, you have 2 choices. Get really good at the quick/screen game or teach them how to run wedge and run it every play. If you can't wedge, well you really screwed then.

I don' think it's a question of "can't."  I think it's more an issue of "aren't."  I've never had or seen any team (either mine, or my opponent's) that didn't have good enough personnel to be able to block.  Now whether they actually did a good job of it, is another discussion altogether.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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This has been my first year coaching middle school football. Our school is the smallest both by size and numbers. My O line isn't big enough to stop a rush. Every team we played rushed 8 and we could never get off a play. Most of the time a defender was about to get the ball about the time the quarterback did. How do you design an offense against bigger, larger teams when you can't block?

Teach them to block better  ::)

The go-to answers:

1.  If you're in gun, throw fast screens, like jailbreak screens to WRs, that allow your OL to release downfield.  Then have the QB catch the snap and immediately lob a screen over the defense's head.  They're taking themselves out of position.

2.  If you're not able to throw or under center, use a blocking scheme that allows your OL to just block down on their inside gap and pick up whatever defender tries to blitz it, then run off tackle or outside.  Again, when the defense blitzes everybody they'll just be taking themselves out of position to get to the ball.

Now, for run blocking, there are some technique things you need to do in order to allow them to pick up some of those blitzes:

A.)  Cut your OL splits down to 1' or less.  Back your OL as far off the ball as possible--have them align with their down hand next to the C's heel if they're in a 3 pt. stance, or align with their toes touching the C's heel in a 2 pt. stance.

B.)  On the first step of their downblock, they need to step with their inside foot and aim to get their head across to the defender's far thighboard.  This puts their body between the defender and cuts off penetration.  Their outside shoulder needs to fit to the defender's outside hip and actually make the block.

C.)  Teach them they aren't blocking specific defenders, but following a track through that gap.  If nothing shows as they go through it, carry their path on to the 1st LB head up or backside of the C.

Some other stuff you can do:

*Vary your snap count by using freeze plays--much, much easier to just tell your OL not to move until you call timeout or call another play at the LOS than to tell them "ok...now we're going to go ON TWO" and watch them false start and shoot yourselves in the foot.  This will help keep the defense from just teeing off and shooting gaps, too, because they won't be able to time it as well.

*Use formations that make it hard for the defense to just press your receivers at the line, then throw to them.  Use things like bunch sets, where the potential for rubs and quick screens makes it hard for them to just send 8.  Lonesome Polecat fromations where the snapper is actually an eligible receiver with the OL and an eligible receiver on the other side of the field for a screen can also work in a similar vein.


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Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
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Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 7683
 

I faced this "Issue" back when my son played JFL ball.  I was an Assistant T Holder.  I had very little input but took the heat for the O Line.

Several things come to mind. 

You cant block 6 or 7 defenders with 5 linemen.
The more they send the more you need to keep back to help.
Given the above, the more you keep in, the less you have to throw to. 
You cant have your QB Looking like the Top of a Trophy standing in the backfield.
Forget the Deep and Intermediate Passes

Screens, Slants, Draw, Boot and Roll Out.  An "Oh Sh*t Pass"  to the back or backs flaring out of the backfield to one side or Both. 
And what others have said

😉

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17794
 

You cant block 6 or 7 defenders with 5 linemen.

^ Maybe.

In the DW, you don't have to worry about 8 on 5, 6 or 7.  That might be only if you're passing, and not even then if your pass-action is setup to look like your run-action.  I digress; the success in the DW lies in being able to outnumber the defense only at the Point of Attack.  So if the defense is lining up in a balanced front with 8 defenders on the line of scrimmage, I need to only concern myself with being able to outnumber them where I'm running the football.  And that's where my additional blockers in this offense come into play.  On the other hand, if the defense were to send 8 defenders only to the Point of Attack, I still have that covered as it's one thing to know where we're running to, but being able to stop it when we have no splits, are shoulder to shoulder/hip to hip and have 2 levels of blockers in front of the ball-carrier....  Thirdly, if they are sending 8 to the Point of Attack (and I understand that's a ridiculous scenario), then other plays such as Counter, XX and Yo-Yo will work just fine.  😉

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachCalande
(@www-coachcalande-com)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7059
 

This has been my first year coaching middle school football. Our school is the smallest both by size and numbers. My O line isn't big enough to stop a rush. Every team we played rushed 8 and we could never get off a play. Most of the time a defender was about to get the ball about the time the quarterback did. How do you design an offense against bigger, larger teams when you can't block?

Use their aggression against them

Pop pass
Screens
Draws
Traps
Freeze plays

Throw quickly to vacated zones. Use fade and slant vs man.

MOJO    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtcRmKnRcsA

Go to WWW.COACHCALANDE.COM  for Double Wing DVDs, Playbook, Drills Manuals, Practice footage and emagazines. Ask me about our new 38 special dvds!


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morris
(@morris)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2694
 

If you run the DW then I suggest going down to Jack Gregory’s section and read a ton. Go to Coach Calande’s section here and his war room forum and read. His materials are great you can adapt his stuff to TKO/SAB blocking. Learn TKO and get really good at it. Flip your OL so kids can get really good at a small amount of skills. You’ll need a way to threaten the flank like rocket or jet. The reason I say use one of those is because the motion will create a response. You can use a majority of the DW playbook with those plays.


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