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CoachMattC
(@coachmattc)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2352
Topic starter  

In a couple weeks I'm starting fresh in a new org where I don't know anyone and noone knows me. My HC seems inclined to give me OL and I'm happy to have the opportunity. Seems like a good time to tweak my approach.

I know what I've done in the past as far as starting with brand new kids, but I want to hear what the biggest priorities should be from others. I'll put my list below and let everyone pick it apart. It's in order of what parts of teaching and evaluation I want to focus on first. I've got plenty of stuff on drills, I'm after more of the big picture.

1. Effort and Aggression
2. Leadership
3. Pad level
3. Footwork
4. Punch
5. Pulling
6. Scheme

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


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davecisar
(@davecisar)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7679
 

Speed and quality of first 2 steps
Pad Level
Angle of attack
Aggression
Who-clear understanding of blocking rules- who they should block
Finishing blocks
Pulling
Plays

Who is as important or even a tad bit more than how- but Im teaching How first
   

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9499
 

Im in the same boat...kinda...new kids who cant block a breeze

My plan in order
- stance
- 12 perfect blocks ** this will self teach low, quickness and contact** they just bang shoulders and drive.  1st week this takes almost a half hour to get 12. Thats a rep almost ever 20 secs
- once consistent in the above...we will teach hand placement and blocking vs armless defenders
- slow oklahoma
-then scheme... i have 10 practices before league jamboree lol

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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CoachMattC
(@coachmattc)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2352
Topic starter  

Who is as important or even a tad bit more than how- but Im teaching How first
 

Thanks Dave, this is useful. Let me ask the question a different way.

If you had to reorganize your the rest of your list above with the most important thing at the top, versus the first thing on the schedule, would it be different?

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


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CoachMattC
(@coachmattc)
Gold
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2352
Topic starter  

Im in the same boat...kinda...new kids who cant block a breeze

My plan in order
- stance
- 12 perfect blocks ** this will self teach low, quickness and contact** they just bang shoulders and drive.  1st week this takes almost a half hour to get 12. Thats a rep almost ever 20 secs
- once consistent in the above...we will teach hand placement and blocking vs armless defenders
- slow oklahoma
-then scheme... i have 10 practices before league jamboree lol

Been a while since I read 12 perfect blocks. Am I wrong in thinking that it uses lots of who? Doesn't the whole group have to go to the right place and make the block to get one perfect rep? Mostly curious about the order of the things in your list.

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
Kryptonite
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 12408
 

In a couple weeks I'm starting fresh in a new org where I don't know anyone and noone knows me. My HC seems inclined to give me OL and I'm happy to have the opportunity. Seems like a good time to tweak my approach.

I know what I've done in the past as far as starting with brand new kids, but I want to hear what the biggest priorities should be from others. I'll put my list below and let everyone pick it apart. It's in order of what parts of teaching and evaluation I want to focus on first. I've got plenty of stuff on drills, I'm after more of the big picture.

1. Effort and Aggression
2. Leadership
3. Pad level
3. Footwork
4. Punch
5. Pulling
6. Scheme

I think scheme needs to be much higher. Only because if they block the wrong guy then all the others don't matter even a little. I am not a believer that scheme wins games unless of course the kids don't know it. It is entirely possible to under emphasize scheme. Not a popular opinion but I stand by it anyway. I don't need all the kids on the line to be leaders but they do need one that will step up and set the tone. I put pad level, footwork and punch all together into technique. Pulling really depends on the scheme. If you are a pull heavy offense like the dw it needs to be higher.


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angalton
(@angalton)
Platinum
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 2552
 

This the wing t blocking progression.

The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4423
 

I think scheme needs to be much higher. Only because if they block the wrong guy then all the others don't matter even a little. I am not a believer that scheme wins games unless of course the kids don't know it. It is entirely possible to under emphasize scheme. Not a popular opinion but I stand by it anyway. I don't need all the kids on the line to be leaders but they do need one that will step up and set the tone. I put pad level, footwork and punch all together into technique. Pulling really depends on the scheme. If you are a pull heavy offense like the dw it needs to be higher.

Tend to agree. If everyone isn't on the same page, you are guaranteed to have at least 1 "non-block", which I think is worse than a bad block.

Not sure where I'd put this on your list, but I'm really big on blocking until the whistle. Film study has me convinced that staying on your block is what turns 4 yard gains into 12 yard gains.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
Kryptonite
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 12408
 

This the wing t blocking progression.

I believe this document should be mandatory reading for youth oline coaches. heck, headers and OCs included. This is where the gold really lies in Clark's offense. Same with Cisar's, its not the playbook part that makes the difference, it's the how to's.


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Michael
(@michael)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 12890
 

Blocking the right guy poorly might be more beneficial to the play than destroying the wrong guy, but I think it's a lot easier to get someone who's destroying the wrong guy to start destroying the right guy than it is to get someone who's blocking the right guy poorly to start destroying the right guy.  So for development purposes, I'd rather see someone destroying the wrong guy than see someone blocking the right guy poorly.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
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Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9499
 

Been a while since I read 12 perfect blocks. Am I wrong in thinking that it uses lots of who? Doesn't the whole group have to go to the right place and make the block to get one perfect rep? Mostly curious about the order of the things in your list.

12 perfect blocks
Set pole at neck of avg player
Partner up arms length off the bar
Give command for what foot to step with and shoulder to hit with
Give cadence
Rep doesnt stop until someone pushes the other passed the bar.
If someone hits the bar the rep doesnt count

From clark

-XXXXXXXX-
C-------------C
-XXXXXXXX

The X's are the players. The C's are two coaches/dads each holding a ten foot section of 220 pound PVC pipe over the LOS. They hold it 6 inches higher than the tops of the player's helmets (The players are in the three point stances.). A third coach, who knows his stuff, roams both sides of the line. He will call the block the players are to use (We use hands blocking). The calls are:

1) Left foot, left shoulderpad on 1
2) Right foot, right shoulderpad on 2

The coach the calls cadence. The players step off on the designated foot and hit designated shoulderpad of their opponent on the proper count. They drive until coach #3 blows his whistle. They will practice blocking each other 12 times. Each block must be "perfect" for height. The two coaches holding the PVC pipe monitor to see if any player's helmet hits the pipe. If just ONE helmet hits the pipe, the block does not count. They MUST go 12 times without hitting the pipe.

The "roaming coach" checks to make sure they step off with proper foot and coaches the losers.

You're developing three blocking points here. They are:

1) to step with playside foot and contact playside shoulderpad.
2) to uncoil from your blocking stance OUTWARDS and not UPWARDS
3) to develop the power and endurance to run block a 12 play drive.

And, for the costs of twenty feet of PVC pipe (about $3) you have replaced both professional chutes and a blocking sled. You've saved on equipment and you're getting in both chute and blocking sled work at the same time

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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PSLCOACHROB
(@pslcoachrob)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 12408
 

Blocking the right guy poorly might be more beneficial to the play than destroying the wrong guy, but I think it's a lot easier to get someone who's destroying the wrong guy to start destroying the right guy than it is to get someone who's blocking the right guy poorly to start destroying the right guy.  So for development purposes, I'd rather see someone destroying the wrong guy than see someone blocking the right guy poorly.

There is no reason why both can't be developed at the same time. Without attention to both you have problems.


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Coach Brad
(@coachbradfromcanada)
Bronze
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 458
 

This the wing t blocking progression.

That's a very thorough resource, thanks for posting!


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 17796
 

Who is as important or even a tad bit more than how- but Im teaching How first

^ Always ^

--DP

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachMattC
(@coachmattc)
Gold
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 2352
Topic starter  

12 perfect blocks
Set pole at neck of avg player
Partner up arms length off the bar
Give command for what foot to step with and shoulder to hit with
Give cadence
Rep doesnt stop until someone pushes the other passed the bar.
If someone hits the bar the rep doesnt count

From clark

-XXXXXXXX-
C-------------C
-XXXXXXXX

The X's are the players. The C's are two coaches/dads each holding a ten foot section of 220 pound PVC pipe over the LOS. They hold it 6 inches higher than the tops of the player's helmets (The players are in the three point stances.). A third coach, who knows his stuff, roams both sides of the line. He will call the block the players are to use (We use hands blocking). The calls are:

1) Left foot, left shoulderpad on 1
2) Right foot, right shoulderpad on 2

The coach the calls cadence. The players step off on the designated foot and hit designated shoulderpad of their opponent on the proper count. They drive until coach #3 blows his whistle. They will practice blocking each other 12 times. Each block must be "perfect" for height. The two coaches holding the PVC pipe monitor to see if any player's helmet hits the pipe. If just ONE helmet hits the pipe, the block does not count. They MUST go 12 times without hitting the pipe.

The "roaming coach" checks to make sure they step off with proper foot and coaches the losers.

You're developing three blocking points here. They are:

1) to step with playside foot and contact playside shoulderpad.
2) to uncoil from your blocking stance OUTWARDS and not UPWARDS
3) to develop the power and endurance to run block a 12 play drive.

And, for the costs of twenty feet of PVC pipe (about $3) you have replaced both professional chutes and a blocking sled. You've saved on equipment and you're getting in both chute and blocking sled work at the same time

Everything about this is great, except that we're putting a lot of emphasis on making contact with the first step. Probably fine for shoulder blocking, but not what I want for hands blocking.

‎"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin


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