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Teaching the Wedge


DT87
 DT87
(@dt87)
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Ran the single wing last year at the HS level.  We ran it on the SG, shoulder to hip of the inside man, protecting our inside gap.  I read a post by Dave Cisar saying he ran wedge up to 6 different ways.  What other way can it be ran?  We didn't have great success running it last year, we are thinking of running SOME balanced formations this year, and if so wedge may be ran easier with the C being the point of it? Thanks


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davecisar
(@davecisar)
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Ran the single wing last year at the HS level.  We ran it on the SG, shoulder to hip of the inside man, protecting our inside gap.  I read a post by Dave Cisar saying he ran wedge up to 6 different ways.  What other way can it be ran?  We didn't have great success running it last year, we are thinking of running SOME balanced formations this year, and if so wedge may be ran easier with the C being the point of it? Thanks

BB out of spinner
BB out of half spin
FB out of half spin
BB out of Jet
FB off of Reverse fake
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Dont worry about the backfield action until youve perfected the progressions to a perfect fit and tight movement downfield

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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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There are two different styles of wedge blocking:

One is the SW/DW style, which uses short splits by the offense and has them all step together tight and get shoulder to shoulder, pushing through the inside shoulder of the "point man" in the wedge and driving their feet to just plow through without allowing any daylight.  This is the one you'll see discussed and used on here the most.  It's the finest short yardage/goal line play in football and isn't a bad call on 1st and 10, either.

The other type is something you used to see a lot of in old SBV and even some Wishbone offenses and it's a little different.  In that one, you'll basically have all the OL inside/backside of the hole scoop through their playside gap while the guys outside of the hole will block down on whatever's inside their gap.  They'll wedge on the G (for inside veer), wedge on the T (for outside veer) and wedge on the C (for dive).  It's simple for the kids, create double and triple teams naturally, and is good for schemes where you're reading or kickout out the DE.

You can run wedge blocking to any back off just about any backfield action, as Dave said.  Just work a wedge play into whatever your core backfield actions are--Buck Series action, Rocket Series action, Spin Series, etc.

From a balanced formation, it probably is easier to make the C the point because you get more even pressure on both side.


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parone
(@parone)
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i wonder why you didn't have success last year?

was your wedge forming up well?  were you getting a good push?  was it splintering early?  were your wedge runners getting up in there and exploding out?

was the opposition doing something to stop the wedge?

rather than trying a new variant, perhaps analyze the failure of the previous?

what back runs behind the wedge is no biggy to me-85% of the wedge is getting it fitted and powering forward.

we had to practice it literally every practice(with 12 YOs) otherwise it got sloppy.

Dream Big.  Work Hard. Stay Humble.


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53
 53
(@_53_)
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Some coaches do a good job of teaching their defense to red wedge blocking. If they're doing this, use it against them and run power with wedge blocking.


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Prodigy
(@prodigy)
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I think the key here is first identifying why you weren't successful with the wedge.  Was it that you didn't get enough repetition in with it during the week?  Were you calling wedge against a stacked box?
Wedge can be a very successful blocking scheme in the playbook but like anything, it requires time.  I found that installing wedge with a single wing was definitely challenging because of the center being in front of the RG who is traditionally the apex of the wedge.  If the RG doesn't get out front quick enough, the wedge isn't going to work.

It sounds like you used Calande's approach to the wedge.  Take a look at others, Cisar, Clark Wilkins (DumCoach), Gregory, Tom Lewis (Shortpunter).  Tom Lewis has wedge calls where any lineman can serve as the apex of the wedge.  It's not something I used myself but I thought it was interesting when I came across it.

Also, if you're thinking about running the single wing from a balanced set, you might as well take a look at the double wing, which believe it or not, brings more blockers to the POA on power than the single wing does.

If you show up for a fair fight, you are unprepared.


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