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gumby_in_co
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May 29, 2019 4:49 pm  

I was thinking of a 4-3 stack, using A gappers like the Killer B. Safety depth like the B also. Using safeties and Mike to give different looks and pressures and stacking olbs behind DE, or some variation of the stack. The A gappers to stifle wedge and trap, everybody else to the ball.

You'd think that having everyone 5 yards off the ball would be vulnerable to inside runs. We CRUSHED them. No, we [shadow=red,left][glow=red,2,300]CRUSHED[/glow][/shadow] them. Teams gave up on wedge, dive and sneak very quickly. Trap? How do you trap someone who isn't there? So my simple philosophy was that 2 A gappers are wasted on all but A gap plays.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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gumby_in_co
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May 29, 2019 5:31 pm  

What were the drills you guys used to enforce this style of play. Not just the names, but what in detail and the coaching emphasis in the drill. I am going to read through the thread completely and see if I can answer some of my questions  also.😁

The first thing we had to do was teach CBs, Dogs Outside Backers and Outside Stackers how to play "catch man" coverage. You always play "catch man" with a partner. If there are 2 threats, then CB and OLB are partners, If there are 3, then CB and Outside Stacker are partners with OLB pressing the middle guy. 3 back pedal steps to make your read. If he's still your guy after 3 steps, he's your guy until the whistle. If you're inside and your guy goes outside within 3 steps, holler at your partner and look for a receiver coming outside in. Drills? Lot's of team with every route combination imaginable.

The first thing I had to fix was the solo tackle. I hate them and on about practice 3, decided I would no longer tolerate them. Enter the "2 whistle drill". This is nothing more than running team. Blow the first whistle when the ball carrier goes down, shout "ONE ONE THOUSAND, TWO ONE THOUSAND!!!", then blow the 2nd whistle. Anyone not within a yard of the ball or at a dead sprint to get there does push ups. Solo tackles were done after about 4 reps.

I was worried about our Week 7 opponent. They were the team we beat in the championship. They had one back who was a speed freak and would happily take a 5 yard loss trying to turn the corner. They had another back who was a speed freak who was patient and had an unbelievable jump cut. I took Clark's "Bermuda Triangle Drill" and adopted it to a defense with no force defender and nothing but 2nd level defenders. In Clark's drill, it's a "contain by committee" approach where 1) Dog, 2) Safety and 3) Mike make up the triangle. You run sweeps at 3 defenders. First, they know which way it's going. Then you progress to making them guess. Give the 2 RBs what  looks like a head start, but really isn't if you look at the geometry. Line them up 6 yards deep behind where the TE would be. Each has a football in his hand. Coach calls cadence, then simulates a toss to either back. That's how the defense knows which back to pursue. Put a cone on the LOS about 5 yards from the sideline.  RB tries to out race the defense to the cone. Once he gets there, he can do anything he wants. In fact, encourage him to juke, spin, jump cut, cut back against the grain . . . anything goes. 1) aims for the far hip of the RB, looking to overtake him, but not so much that you take yourself out of the tackle. 2) aims for center mass with full aggression looking for the "Kill Shot". No discipline, no holding back. 3) aims for the near hip, slightly trailing looking for cutback. Looking to DESTROY cutbacks, stalls or cuts.  That's the KB version.  To accommodate our defense, CB is 1, Dog OLB is 2 and anybody else in a position to do so is 3. I cross out Dog because he's not a traditional Dog/Spur/Bandit. He's just an OLB or Safety . . . whatever. Most important is that he can cover a receiver. Realistically, 3 is an Outside Stacker, Reaper, DT (remember, he's lined up 5 yards off the ball). It's possible that a NT (again, 5 yards off the ball) or Middle stacker is in position to trail near hip. Anyone outside of that, you can probably forget it. Away side CB stays put until the ball crosses the LOS. Then pick an angle and save a TD. Away side OLB slow plays to the depth of the deepest offensive back, looking for "anything weird coming back at you". Everyone else, pick an angle and fly to the ball. Everyone plays like a linebacker.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
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May 29, 2019 8:54 pm  

So my simple philosophy was that 2 A gappers are wasted on all but A gap plays.

I'm glad that someone understands that.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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angalton
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May 30, 2019 6:43 am  

Thanks...A gappers are our one task (mpp) types. Team make up will dictate how we do things.

The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.


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CoachDP
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May 30, 2019 7:06 am  

A gappers are our one task (mpp) types. Team make up will dictate how we do things.

So you play against offenses that run primarily the A-gap?

—Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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gumby_in_co
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May 30, 2019 7:20 am  

Thanks...A gappers are our one task (mpp) types. Team make up will dictate how we do things.

I totally understand. In fact, I started out the season that way. I had a few kids who were "speed challenged" and Mahonz didn't want them for the offense. Yet, when I backed them up and turned them loose, they were MUCH more effective. Early on, they tended to draw double teams for reasons that are unknown to me. But hey, if our opponent wants to put 2 blockers on a kid that might make one tackle per game . . . who am I to stop them? By the end of the season, these guys turned into genuine fire breathers.

Along the way, Mahonz would give me timid WR rotators who weren't getting enough plays. I would put them at Middle Stacker or NT (both 5 yards off the ball) and turn them loose. If they did NOTHING, they still drew blockers that would otherwise try to block defenders who actually made tackles. While they were still technically "A Gappers", they lined up 5 yards from the ball with the A gap as their starting point, but with instructions to find the ball and get after it as they attacked downhill. As an added benefit, they had some fun and learned some football along the way.

And yes, our team makeup gave us a lot of "wiggle room". The true test will be our 3rd graders, whom I will get in 3 weeks for a full contact camp. I will teach ALL of them to play like linebackers and I will not stop teaching that until either they can all do it, or the season is over. Best available "linebackers" will play defense.

In all honesty, I always thought the key to DP's success on defense was that he just had immense talent. Watching his film, from the Durham War Eagles, it was clear that I didn't have single kid who could play on his defense. For years, that's just where I left it. Mahonz, too. We just didn't think we had the Jimmies or Joes to play this "reckless" style of defense.

A few weeks ago, I subbed in some WRs on D and somehow our defense got better. I don't know why, it just did. At the very least, I had to question all that I thought I "knew" about defense. Then I came to the realization that I can't expect a kid to be a fire breather when I'm telling him to "hit an offensive tackle", or "hit a lead blocker with your inside shoulder", or "destroy a block", or "Bear crawl an A gap".

I'm betting the farm that ANY kid will get good at something if they do it enough times. All I'm asking is that they play full speed, downhill with a complete focus on the ball carrier.  We'll see, to be sure.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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angalton
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May 30, 2019 8:18 am  

Sometimes I have to step outside my norm. This helped me a ton.

The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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May 30, 2019 9:52 am  

Sometimes I have to step outside my norm. This helped me a ton.

Glad to be of help. We came into the season knowing we would be vastly under sized. We actually figured the defense would suck and it would be up to the offense to out score everyone. Knowing we would lose every battle in the trenches, we decided not to fight in the trenches. Somewhere along the way, we learned something.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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mahonz
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May 30, 2019 12:06 pm  

I totally understand. In fact, I started out the season that way. I had a few kids who were "speed challenged" and Mahonz didn't want them for the offense. Yet, when I backed them up and turned them loose, they were MUCH more effective. Early on, they tended to draw double teams for reasons that are unknown to me. But hey, if our opponent wants to put 2 blockers on a kid that might make one tackle per game . . . who am I to stop them? By the end of the season, these guys turned into genuine fire breathers.

Along the way, Mahonz would give me timid WR rotators who weren't getting enough plays. I would put them at Middle Stacker or NT (both 5 yards off the ball) and turn them loose. If they did NOTHING, they still drew blockers that would otherwise try to block defenders who actually made tackles. While they were still technically "A Gappers", they lined up 5 yards from the ball with the A gap as their starting point, but with instructions to find the ball and get after it as they attacked downhill. As an added benefit, they had some fun and learned some football along the way.

And yes, our team makeup gave us a lot of "wiggle room". The true test will be our 3rd graders, whom I will get in 3 weeks for a full contact camp. I will teach ALL of them to play like linebackers and I will not stop teaching that until either they can all do it, or the season is over. Best available "linebackers" will play defense.

In all honesty, I always thought the key to DP's success on defense was that he just had immense talent. Watching his film, from the Durham War Eagles, it was clear that I didn't have single kid who could play on his defense. For years, that's just where I left it. Mahonz, too. We just didn't think we had the Jimmies or Joes to play this "reckless" style of defense.

A few weeks ago, I subbed in some WRs on D and somehow our defense got better. I don't know why, it just did. At the very least, I had to question all that I thought I "knew" about defense. Then I came to the realization that I can't expect a kid to be a fire breather when I'm telling him to "hit an offensive tackle", or "hit a lead blocker with your inside shoulder", or "destroy a block", or "Bear crawl an A gap".

I'm betting the farm that ANY kid will get good at something if they do it enough times. All I'm asking is that they play full speed, downhill with a complete focus on the ball carrier.  We'll see, to be sure.

I believe the only time this failed was the first drive in the first game of the season.  It was impressive to watch them develop right along with you. I initially thought we were out of our minds nuts. Its what I enjoyed about Spring ball. Do stuff you would never consider in the Fall because it didn't matter.

Its like the mega splits thing. We fine tuned and experimented in the Spring and then did well with it in the Fall. I say this because we should trust in what we learn. Last Fall with the Smurfs we went foot to foot. Then after an 0-3 start went mega splits and won 4 of 5.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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CoachDP
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May 30, 2019 12:53 pm  

Then I came to the realization that I can't expect a kid to be a fire breather when I'm telling him to "hit an offensive tackle", or "hit a lead blocker with your inside shoulder", or "destroy a block", or "Bear crawl an A gap".

B.I.N.G.O. 

—Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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gumby_in_co
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May 30, 2019 1:22 pm  

B.I.N.G.O. 

—Dave

Straight up question, Dave. How many defenders do you want on the ball RIGHT NOW?

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
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May 30, 2019 5:45 pm  

Straight up question, Dave. How many defenders do you want on the ball RIGHT NOW?

Want?  11. 
But the reality is that not everyone's going to arrive there at the same time.  That being said, I do expect all 11 on the ball-carrier by the end of the play.  At least, that's the way we practice it.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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gumby_in_co
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May 31, 2019 4:20 am  

Want?  11. 
But the reality is that not everyone's going to arrive there at the same time.  That being said, I do expect all 11 on the ball-carrier by the end of the play.  At least, that's the way we practice it.

--Dave

Got it. Looking for a coaching point, but was thinking about the guys in coverage, backside CB, backside OLB. Once you’ve done your job, relentlessly pursue the ball to the whistle.

Thinking about it, this was the first defense that I can remember that never got beat by bootleg/counter/reverse. I’ll go back and watch film to figure out why.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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May 31, 2019 10:28 am  

Looking for a coaching point, but was thinking about the guys in coverage, backside CB, backside OLB. Once you’ve done your job, relentlessly pursue the ball to the whistle.

--Our defense takes the same line of approach, for each play. And our plays at practice aren't over until all 11 are on the ball-carrier; regardless of whether you're the closest line of defense, or the furthest away. You will continue to pursue UNTIL you've made contact, or you'll get off the field.  There is no "watching someone else do your job."  Your job is to make the tackle, every time, whether or not you were the first one to arrive.  And of course if you get there first, we keep a stat for it.  (We call it being a "First Responder.")  But these guys inevitably have more solo tackles than anyone else.

Thinking about it, this was the first defense that I can remember that never got beat by bootleg/counter/reverse. I’ll go back and watch film to figure out why.

--We can't ever get beat on a boot/counter/reverse because our line of pursuit is never based on where the ball-carrier is going; it's based on our line of pursuit.  And our line of pursuit accounts for boot/counter/reverse on every play.  Now we may miss a tackle and give up a big gain or score, but it won't be because we were fooled or out of position.  We can't get fooled because our defenders' responsibilities has nothing to do with making a decision.  That's why offenses have to adjust to what we do defensively.  We don't adjust our defense to they type or style of offense we will face. 

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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May 31, 2019 12:42 pm  

it's based on our line of pursuit.  And our line of pursuit accounts for boot/counter/reverse on every play

Can you expand on this?

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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