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2labs
(@2labs)
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August 22, 2017 7:53 pm  

I wasn't planning on coaching this year, but I have just been asked to help coach 11 year olds, a month after the season has started. The head coach is running the Wishbone, but doesn't teach the players who they are supposed to be blocking. They are just supposed to "block and drive someone". What are the blocking rules for the Wishbone offense?

I have never been around the Wishbone, so with that being said, does anybody have any coaching material or aids that you could supply to me or recommend to help teach this team the correct way to run the Wishbone?


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Dusty Ol Fart
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August 22, 2017 8:36 pm  

Good Luck!  (Rolls Eyes)

The Wishbone is either a Formation or your Offense (Option).  Either is fine as long as you Coaches understand why and, more importantly,  how it works either way! If you dont set your OLINE to be effective its doesnt make a difference which one you choose!  Just Block Some One has NEVER worked for anyone! 

Need to know what your choice (approach) is.  If you are just using the Wishbone as a Formation, Veer blocking concepts work well.  If you are using the Option, everything is predicated on the Dive Read first! 

JMHO 

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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gumby_in_co
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August 23, 2017 5:33 am  

Yeesh. I'm going to assume that option is off the table. Let's start with "What plays are you trying to run out of wishbone?"

I'm a big fan of mega wide splits, myself. However, I joined a team that had been doing it for a few years before I showed up. I came from the "foot to foot" world of the double wing and I had to be dragged kicking and screaming into the land of giant splits. I could see how it could go VERY wrong for someone trying it out for the first time. I like them because they create their own mechanical advantages and because they can be very forgiving when you are out manned up front.

Gap On Down is a great scheme, but since no linemen are climbing, you should probably pull a guy or two from the back side to help with linebackers.

TKO/SAB (severe angle blocking) is also great, but again, probably need a puller.

My base is Gap On Backer. I like it because my linemen are great at climbing to the next level. However, that leaves a lot of 1 on 1 on the LOS. I can mitigate that with "help" calls where an uncovered lineman gives a good shot to buddy's block on his way to the 2nd level.

Depends on what you're trying to do offensively. Also, you should have different blocking schemes for different types of runs and at least one pass protection scheme.

If I'm being honest, your offense is in a lot of trouble. I've been in your shoes. If I were betting, I'd give you odds that  your HC will push back on you for trying to teach blocking schemes. "THEY DON'T NEED THAT CRAP! THEY JUST NEED TO GET AFTER IT!", or "That's too complicated for 11 year olds.", etc. etc. etc.

On the off chance you ARE running option, found this gem the other day:

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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August 23, 2017 5:40 am  

What everyone else has said: what plays are you running?

The wishbone is a formation.  The old "wishbone offense" was a triple option system, but some teams line up in it to run straight ahead with 3 backs.

Plays need to be blocked differently depending on what you're actually trying to do.  "Just block somebody" is a recipe for disaster.  What plays are you running and what parts of the field are you trying to attack?


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gumby_in_co
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August 23, 2017 6:03 am  

The wishbone is a formation.  The old "wishbone offense" was a triple option system, but some teams line up in it to run straight ahead with 3 backs.

Plays need to be blocked differently depending on what you're actually trying to do.  "Just block somebody" is a recipe for disaster.  What plays are you running and what parts of the field are you trying to attack?

Exactly. My HS team in the 80's was a "wishbone" team. We ran both triple option and a Power/Counter game. VERY different blocking.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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Dusty Ol Fart
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August 23, 2017 6:32 am  

If they run it similar to Barta Veer or TKO will work. 

JMHO 🙂

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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2labs
(@2labs)
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August 23, 2017 6:54 am  

Guys, thanks for the replies so far. I really didn't want to coach this year, but it's obvious they need the help. It is a very simple Wishbone formation with no option being run so far. Looking at the basic playbook it is just some blasts, sweeps, powers,and counters, with a couple of passes. I think the players that need the most help, first, is the O line. They need to have some rules on where/who they need to be blocking on each play.


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Ronin
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August 23, 2017 7:14 am  

One of the best teams we ever played was a Wishbone team... by formation, not the Wishbone option.  What they did great was snap to QB, who would run a sweep with the three backs as lead blockers.  Very devastating.  Put your best open field blockers as RBs and even when the defense knows it is coming... very little you can do. 

They are the reason we switched our Defense to Clark's KB. 


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gumby_in_co
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August 23, 2017 8:00 am  

Guys, thanks for the replies so far. I really didn't want to coach this year, but it's obvious they need the help. It is a very simple Wishbone formation with no option being run so far. Looking at the basic playbook it is just some blasts, sweeps, powers,and counters, with a couple of passes. I think the players that need the most help, first, is the O line. They need to have some rules on where/who they need to be blocking on each play.

If I were in your shoes, I'd first rule out pulling for two reasons: 1) I don't think the HC would be on board with it and 2) Pulling requires some type of coordination with the blocking backs and I don't think you're going to get that.

For runs between the tackles, I'd go with Gap(inside) On Backer rules. This means look to your inside gap. If there's a guy, he's yours. If not, look up. If there's a guy on you, he's yours. If neither, go to the nearest linebacker.

This will work for sweeps, but not as well. You'll always be wasting at least one guy. There are a lot of sweep schemes, but basically, you block to the direction of the play with the goal of sealing one more guy on the play side edge.

Easiest pass pro scheme is "wall" blocking where everyone steps toward the center. You'll have one or two (maybe more) rushers come free at the edges, so you'll need to coordinate with the backs coach to pick up the extra guys.

If d-linemen are more of a concern to you than linebackers, then use Gap On Down, where if you're uncovered by your first two rules, you block down to your inside buddy and double team his guy.

Pick your poison.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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angalton
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August 23, 2017 9:20 am  

I am GOOB blocking on may base plays, blast and smash. One lead block on blast and two on smash. Double teams work to backer and the player over taking backer will depend on the hole in which play is ran. Bump is our help call. It just calls for a chip by his lineman called. GOOB ( inside gap, on, outside gap, to backer)

The greatest accomplishment is not in never failing, but in rising again after you fail.


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Dusty Ol Fart
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August 23, 2017 6:35 pm  

The simplest scheme I have found is nothing more than using Zone calls and Scoop Blocks:

Ace (Combo C/G) Deuce (Combo G/T) Trey (Combo T/TE).  Every one Not involved with the Combo calls uses Scoop step (Fire) stepping with the foot closest to the whole first! 

WHY the Scoop Step cuts off DL flow to the play first.  If no one is there Go Second level hit the first ugly.  Does it have flaws?  Maybe but it also develops a simple pattern for them to remember! Not to mention a foundation to work from.  2 things to get.  Am I involved in the Combination Call?  No? Then what foot do I step with first? 

Even if I am not running the Option, the Dive play is a "Must Have" for the Wishbone!! Use the Combo Call to lead the FB Dive!  8)

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


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Dimson
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August 23, 2017 7:20 pm  

Coach McGee has a nice wishbone playbook that you can run with at any age. You should check it out. He even has a clinic on Rob's site.


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blockandtackle
(@coacharnold)
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August 23, 2017 7:29 pm  

The simplest scheme I have found is nothing more than using Zone calls and Scoop Blocks:

Ace (Combo C/G) Deuce (Combo G/T) Trey (Combo T/TE).  Every one Not involved with the Combo calls uses Scoop step (Fire) stepping with the foot closest to the whole first! 

WHY the Scoop Step cuts off DL flow to the play first.  If no one is there Go Second level hit the first ugly.  Does it have flaws?  Maybe but it also develops a simple pattern for them to remember! Not to mention a foundation to work from.  2 things to get.  Am I involved in the Combination Call?  No? Then what foot do I step with first? 

Even if I am not running the Option, the Dive play is a "Must Have" for the Wishbone!! Use the Combo Call to lead the FB Dive!  8)

That's pretty much what my zone system is, except we don't use "combo" calls.  That stuff's just built in: if you have a guy head up or shaded backside of you, work up through his near number with your backside arm while you keep your play side arm free and eyes in your play side gap.  We have a little tweak for the C to "wrong-step" and basically combo when he has a 1 or 2i backside of him, but that's it.  It works great at the HS level.

It's very simple.  You can add some calls to adjust the backside of it if you like so that you're basing out the BSDE (which can be used for dive/iso blocking).  You can also recycle the zone system on other plays like speed option (zone away and pitch off the DE), counter (zone away, kick the DE), etc.

If you're not running option in the wishbone, IMO you're missing out if you don't run the Double Dive series.  It's a lot like the veer in many respects, except you don't have to work the option reads and pitches.  Run those 4-5 plays with a Double Iso, Counter Iso, Toss Sweep, and Bootleg and you've got a pretty complete little offense that just has 3-4 blocking schemes in it.


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Bob Goodman
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August 26, 2017 2:16 pm  

It is a very simple Wishbone formation with no option being run so far.  Looking at the basic playbook it is just some blasts, sweeps, powers,and counters, with a couple of passes.

OK, so power Y.  (They never called the formation "wishbone" until a triple option was put in for it.  Until then it was just "Y formation".)  Probably should be posted in the T style section rather than option.

With 10Us doing that I'd use a version of progressive splits because I'd want to be able to pull both guards, although you may find yourself compromising by pulling only 1.  So 0 C-G split, then arm's length or more for the Ts & Es.  For sweep I'd want to pull both, which means the other OL cover down or release.  Power very similar, but play side G is kicking out.

If "blast" is a lead play, then block MOMA.

Counters -- depends on whether 10 YOs are sophisticated enough to be influenced by blocking.  I suspect most will just follow the backfield action.

Pocket passes, use an inside-out count system..


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bignose
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August 30, 2017 4:15 pm  

OK, so power Y.  (They never called the formation "wishbone" until a triple option was put in for it.  Until then it was just "Y formation".)  Probably should be posted in the T style section rather than option.

In discussing the Texas offense, someone said it looked like a Y, but there already was a Y formation (a variation of the Single Wing).
Sports writer Mickey Hershkowitz then said: "It looks like a pulley bone."
Darrell Royal then called it the Wishbone

You rush a miracle man, you get rotten miracles!


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