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Easy passing concepts


Seth54
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What are some easy passing concepts that you guys like to use? I’m coaching 10-11 yo kids and my QB doesn’t have a great arm. We are usually good with our waggle and TE Pop pass, but they don’t seem to be hitting at quite the right depth this year. I’m looking for some easy completions, mostly as a way to spread the formation and keep the defense from packing in tight around the LOS. 


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CoachDP
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Seth, just decide where you want to throw the football to and who you want to catch it.  From there, put a receiver (or several) lined up to run off defenders from that area.  When those defenders clear out to run with the receivers, send your primary to where those defenders used to be.  This is often either a backside TE, or a backfield receiver/H-Back who can remain hidden until the area clears.

From Trips, have 3 receivers run Go-routes on run sweeps to that side.  When defenders begin to disregard receivers to contain the run sweeps, any/all receivers should be open.  From there, send 2 of the 3 receivers on a Go, while 1 of them has a come-back.  That gives you 3 plays from doing the exact same thing: Sweep, 3 Verticals, 2 Verticals and a Come Back.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

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gumby_in_co
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^^^

This.  About the only thing I'd add is that I decided that the "run them off" routes can be a waste, so I made sure that each route in our combo is something we could throw to if the defense gives it to us. We also run out of bunches, so "3 go routes" is a dumb thing to do for us. We'd have 3 guys close enough to lasso them with a hula hoop.

Let's say you're in trips right, so you have (just an example):

A      

              B                C

Some of my favorite combos are:

A - quick out 

B - fade or corner (deep and outside)

C - quick slant

or 

A - slant

B - quick out

C - post

Lastly, (I'm sure my terminology isn't correct), think about mesh and smash concepts. For me, a mesh 2 or more routes that cross very shallow. A smash is putting a cornerback in conflict, so #1 runs deep and #2 runs short and outside or #1 crosses CBs face to the inside while #2 runs deep. I use smash when defenders are playing off and mesh when they are playing close.

Also, play action is your friend. Want to get someone open? Fake a sweep or a dive. Incorporate that into your pass protection.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @seth54

What are some easy passing concepts that you guys like to use? I’m coaching 10-11 yo kids and my QB doesn’t have a great arm. We are usually good with our waggle and TE Pop pass, but they don’t seem to be hitting at quite the right depth this year. I’m looking for some easy completions, mostly as a way to spread the formation and keep the defense from packing in tight around the LOS. 

We've put in a simple turn-in-and-catch by our WB.  Trouble is, he then turns out to run (continuing his pivot), and the defense is on top of him in both our practice and scrimmages  But it's an easy completion.  The footwork is outside foot 1 step downfield, plant and pivot on it inside.

It replaced a quick out to the WB.  The trouble with that one was that although it was almost as easy a completion and he was downfield (about a yard), he then fell down nearly every time.

You say your QB doesn't have a great arm.  Does your HB have any arm?  See if he can hit any passes off sweep action.  Also back where I coached in 2010, our throwback screen to the QB off sweep action was a killer.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by Bob Goodman

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Bob Goodman
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Another we've put in has the WB pick inside while the TE runs an out.


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ZACH
 ZACH
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I try to have route packages for man and zone.  We haven't faced a 2 high team in over 8 years so it's single high off man/ cover 3.  

From there I try to have very high percentage routes like drag/corner/flat/seam from the interior and hook/ slant / go route on the outside.  

10 and under the seam and slant are our favorites/ older it's the drag and flat from backfield.  

All packages are designed like dcwt pass (1,2,3 open) under 10 and 2 reads older.  If I can ever get an easy way to RPO with more than slant and seam we will do that.

Hope this helps

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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Seth54
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Thanks for all the replies. We played our first regular season game Saturday and lost 12-0. It was 6-0 pretty much the whole way with the other club calling timeouts at the end so they could punch in another score with under 30 seconds left in the game, even though I had already emptied the bench. 

My offense never got on track running or passing. My QB actually asked me not to throw a pass on one play because he was scared, so I’m going to have a talk with him before our next practice about what my expectations are for the position. Hopefully it was just first game jitters, we had a little bit of that going around.


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Seth54
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Thanks for all the replies. Life has been a little hectic(Hurricane Ida blew through and damaged our fields), so I didn’t get to implement anything to this point. We played our first regular season game Saturday and lost 12-0. It was 6-0 pretty much the whole way with the other club calling timeouts at the end so they could punch in another score with under 30 seconds left in the game, even though I had already emptied the bench. 

My offense never got on track running or passing, which was the most frustrating thing. Speaking of passing, my QB actually asked me not to throw a pass on one play because he was scared, so I’m going to have a talk with him before our next practice about what my expectations are for the position. Hopefully it was just first game jitters, we had a little bit of that going around.


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Bob Goodman
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Remember the short out I wrote of above (that turns out to be to the TE, not the WB, who picks inside)?  It's after a belly fake the other way and short roll toward the strong side by the QB, and it depends entirely on yards after catch because the reception is within a yard of the line of scrimmage, and it always seemed to get stopped there in practice.

Anyway, yesterday we needed it to help get a first down to run out the clock at the end of the game, and sure enough our TE was stood up by the defense just there, before he could make his turn after catching the ball.  Well, our QB continued his roll toward that sideline (the near one), and as our TE stood there stalemated and facing our backfield, he lateraled practically flat across to the QB who was overlapping him.  His subsequent run along the sideline before being forced out turned into enough of a gain that instead of 4th and about 14, we were left with 4th and 7.  Then we drew our opponents offside, and then got the first down on a belly run to barely cover the remaining 2 yards to seal the win.

We had never practiced that lateral, I never saw the kids improvise that before.  However, I did already have such an "overlap" play in mind for the next time I got to install an offense of my choice, and was glad to see its feasibility demonstrated yesterday!

This post was modified 6 days ago by Bob Goodman

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Seth54
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Back when I played rugby in my 20s we called that a pass and loop. I did a lot of that playing rugby 7s

 

i think the Dallas Cowboys had a play where they almost scored at the end of the half with a lateral that reminded me of a rugby pass also


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @seth54

Back when I played rugby in my 20s we called that a pass and loop. I did a lot of that playing rugby 7s

Was the return pass just before the original passer looped behind?  (You can sometimes get away with an obstruction doing that.)  Or was it after the original passer looped behind?


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ZACH
 ZACH
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@bob-goodman

This is called a "switch" player with the ball attacks on an angle toward the intended receiver.  Then pops the ball up behind him as the intended receiver runs behind. 

 

The intention is to have the ball carrier grab 2 defenders attn creating a lane for the switch.

 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @bucksweep58

@bob-goodman

This is called a "switch" player with the ball attacks on an angle toward the intended receiver.  Then pops the ball up behind him as the intended receiver runs behind. 

 

The intention is to have the ball carrier grab 2 defenders attn creating a lane for the switch.

 

No, a switch is different.  The switch pass changes the direction of flow to the inside, and/or against the grain of the passing/running movement.

A loop move continues the attack to the outside to create an overlap.  What I wanted to know from Seth54 was whether they were delivering the ball before the receiver went behind the passer, or after.  The impromptu one I saw Sunday had the receiver of the return pass already outside when the ball was passed, but the version I'd wanted to install had the return pass come just before their paths crossed -- or be a handoff just as they crossed.  My idea was similar to tower pass, or hook and lateral, in drawing the defense to the first receiver.  In our practices it seemed we had a defender on the first receiver's back just about instantly, as it was in our game, but I hadn't thought of it in relationship to my previous idea.  Clearly our players had more imagination than I did at that instant.

We'd've had nobody out there for a switch move anyway.  Looping uses a player who was already running that way from the inside -- in this case the quarterback.

This post was modified 4 days ago by Bob Goodman

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Seth54
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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wP0a_NrnDsM

I think you have the right idea, Bob. This is the basic gist, although we would do this as a warm up/conditioning drill where the guy who started with the ball continues to pass and loop with everyone in the drill. 

I’m not exactly sure how I’d implement this into football, but it would probably end up looking a lot like a hook and ladder with some type of tunnel screen action with the looper running back towards the formation to give to the looper. 


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @seth54

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wP0a_NrnDsM

I think you have the right idea, Bob. This is the basic gist, although we would do this as a warm up/conditioning drill where the guy who started with the ball continues to pass and loop with everyone in the drill. 

I’m not exactly sure how I’d implement this into football, but it would probably end up looking a lot like a hook and ladder with some type of tunnel screen action with the looper running back towards the formation to give to the looper. 

You mean to implement it as a drill?  Or into your offense?  If I knew how to download a HUDL clip, I'd show you what went down Sunday, but that's not how I'd want to install it anyway.

I think I might've put up here once how I wanted to implement it in the sidesaddle T, with the flanker motioning inward and the pass thrown quickly to the flanker from the opposite halfback while he rolled in that direction.  I think all eyes go off the passer after he passes, everyone converges on the flanker, and the return pass gets the original passer a lot of space out wide.  Once they've seen that a few times, they stop converging on the flanker.

If instead of a forward pass you do the loop move with an "I" tailback getting a pitch going wide and a return handoff to the QB, you have Fordham U.'s sweep-and-swap play.

This post was modified 3 days ago by Bob Goodman

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