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Vince148
(@vince148)
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September 29, 2017 5:37 am  

One of the things that I saw my linemen struggling with was quickness on their first two steps. We started incorporating the tennis ball drill. However, for next year, I was thinking about also incorporating the "Buzz Saw" ladder agility drill to further help. It seems like it would have transfer to the first two steps.


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Coach Correa
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September 29, 2017 6:17 am  

Vince when do your linemen ever do that on grass ? Bro the best way to nail those 1st two steps is bye always have them getting off the ball, bird dogging,and step and freeze do it everyday. Get off's, Dog fight  and what i mentioned earlier are much more worth your investment ....

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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spidermac
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September 29, 2017 6:23 am  

Agree...

We work first two steps freeze a lot...

None of them suck, they just haven't found what the kid is good at yet.


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Wing-n-It
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September 29, 2017 7:34 am  

I heard something from Clark a LONG time ago....... I have been telling my players this ever since

Give me three steps...THREE steps my way and then go play football.

I do the three because of the song that is now playing in my head.

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge


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Vince148
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September 29, 2017 7:35 am  

We ALWAYS work those steps.

To Tito's point though...

As a powerlifter, we do 3 lifts, squat, bench, and deadlift. There are schools of thought that have you work exercises that are similar to the basic lift. This allows you to work the movements at maximum effort knowing that there will be a huge carryover to the main lift. Example might include box squats. We don't squat to a box in competitition, but the box develops similar neurological pathways to a regular squat. The argument can also be made then as to why do we use olympic lifts in S&C programs for football. There are no movements that we use on the field that really duplicate a snatch or clean. It's because it develops the same neurologic pathways of triple extension. So the idea of the Buzz Saw would be to develop the neurologic pattern that you would see on the first two steps. That would just isolate the movement pattern without having to worry about hand placement, etc. The whole is the sum of its parts. Isn't that why we teach in progressions?


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Coach Correa
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September 29, 2017 7:41 am  

Vince the only to get better at playing football especially when it comes to techniques you want executed a certain way. Is by isolating those specific movement's in drills that pertain to what it is you do. In short you only get better at playing football by playing football.....

Head Coach Tito Correa New Britain Raiders 14-U


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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September 29, 2017 7:43 am  

V - get out and recruit players for next year or it won't really matter...

And yes I am going to keep doing this - you're welcome!

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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Michael
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September 29, 2017 7:44 am  

I read something a while back about how sport-identical movements help, but sport-similar movements, which are what people who say "sport-specific" are usually talking about, actually harm whatever movements are involved with what people like to call "muscle memory" for the particular sport task.

It made a lot of sense to me and I've kept it in mind ever since.

Basically, switching from your car to a bicycle isn't a big deal, but switching from your car to someone else's car is a pain in the ass.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


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Vince148
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September 29, 2017 7:54 am  

Vince the only to get better at playing football especially when it comes to techniques you want executed a certain way. Is by isolating those specific movement's in drills that pertain to what it is you do. In short you only get better at playing football by playing football.....

Definitely agree. However, when you have a weak point, you want to isolate it to make it stronger. Same as what I do with lifting. If I have a weak lockout in my bench, I do more triceps work. If I have a weak squat, I do more glutes and hamstrings.

I teach the basics like everyone else. But, if my kid can't get his feet moving fast enough, he's going to get beat. He knows how to punch. He knows the steps and hand placement. But his feet don't move fast. So to me, the logical fix is develop a neurologic pattern to develop quicker feet. I'm not saying it's the right thing, but it seems like thing to try based on my own knowledge and experiences in lifting and strength training.


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Vince148
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September 29, 2017 8:07 am  

V - get out and recruit players for next year or it won't really matter...

And yes I am going to keep doing this - you're welcome!

We already have 14 kids for next season, so you can relax now. Thank you for caring.


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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September 29, 2017 8:10 am  

We already have 14 kids for next season, so you can relax now. Thank you for caring.

I prob won't though!

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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gumby_in_co
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September 29, 2017 8:17 am  

I save the tennis ball drill for D-line.

I have 3 subs on the o-line who need a lot of work. When we do indies, the other o-line coach works with the group. I pull the subs out one at a time for an intensive 1 on 1 technique clinic. The first thing I start off with is a two step punch drill. We always go from a 2 point. On Hit, the player will take his first two steps (load and explode), punching violently. The main focus is to get his 2nd step down as fast as humanly possible. This forces him to move his arms much faster than he's used to.

As a hockey player and coach, I learned that the upper body, especially the arms are often the "bottle neck" when it comes to speed. You can't push off on one skate properly unless your weight and balance are properly loaded. I learned that moving my arms faster helped me load my weight and balance much faster, which in turn allowed me to push off my skate faster. Or at least my arms stopped being the element that slowed me down. My son is an extremely fast and technical skater. When I pointed out my "discovery", he agreed.

Then, when Mahonz had me start plyometrics, I noticed the same thing happening in these exercises that the kids were unfamiliar with. Slow, inefficient and/or improper arm movement was slowing down the legs and the entire exercise.

Then, this Fall season, I incorporated the focus on arm movement into our load/explode drill. Get the hands/arms working like pistons and now the 2nd step comes down fast. When I run this drill, I have them do this 10 times in extremely rapid fashion. "HIT! Thump! RELOAD!", "HIT! Thump! RELOAD!" repeat x10.  I then, start pointing out other details like elbows tight to ribs, stomp your heels, etc.

Going to try it with an experienced o-lineman tonight. I just fired "I would, if I could, but I can't" and replaced him with "I could if I would, but I won't". I caught him on film not even lifting his head until the D-lineman was across the LOS. I've been hammering his effort for 5 seasons now to no avail. I'm going to attack his technique before I fire him for good.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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Bob Goodman
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September 29, 2017 11:53 am  

One of the things that I saw my linemen struggling with was quickness on their first two steps. We started incorporating the tennis ball drill. However, for next year, I was thinking about also incorporating the "Buzz Saw" ladder agility drill to further help. It seems like it would have transfer to the first two steps.

/blockquote>
Our team's always doing drills like that, then coming out of the ladder & taking a hit from a bag-holding coach.  I think it encourages the bad habit of looking down.  I don't see why you'd have such unrealistic practice.  Why not practice the actual 1st 2 steps they'll be taking in games?


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GP
 GP
(@gpenn44)
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September 29, 2017 11:56 am  

We already have 14 kids for next season, so you can relax now. Thank you for caring.

V - good work on getting up to 14 - keep going! I still prob won't relax but good sh!t.

"Motivation is simple. You eliminate those who are not motivated." - Lou Holtz


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
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Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 9504
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September 29, 2017 11:59 am  

I read something a while back about how sport-identical movements help, but sport-similar movements, which are what people who say "sport-specific" are usually talking about, actually harm whatever movements are involved with what people like to call "muscle memory" for the particular sport task.

It made a lot of sense to me and I've kept it in mind ever since.

Basically, switching from your car to a bicycle isn't a big deal, but switching from your car to someone else's car is a pain in the ass.

See also "uncanny valley" and "shibboleth".


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