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Gang tackling drill  

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CoachSugg
(@coachsugg)
Silver
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 878
Head Coach
September 25, 2017 11:57 am  

Need help with drills to work on gang tackling.

Limited roster, have an issue with kids pulling up when a teammate is making a tackle.

Aggression training is in progress but need some specific work in this area.

Thanks in advance.

Kent Sugg
Bridge Creek, OK


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4142
September 25, 2017 12:30 pm  

                                        Coach
                                        |  |
                                        |  | full round

                                        ^ cone

                            ^                      ^

                      ^                                    ^

Tackler at each cone. All attack the bag on "Hit". Coach holds the bag up. Cone configuration ensures everyone gets there at different times. The first time you run it, the guys in back will "pull up" like you describe. Correct it loudly and immediately. Coaching point is to arrive with violence.

Point of the drill is to teach the first guy to the bag that he's going to get trucked by his teammates. . and that's okay. Also, the late comers learn that they are going to truck their teammate . . and that is also okay.

Change it up by running with the dummy left or right, adding an element of pursuit.

We used to add a "fumble" element to the drill by dropping a ball. I stopped doing that because you get some "vultures" who won't get in on the tackle because they're waiting for a ball to pop out.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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coachmiket
(@coachmiket)
Gold
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 1371
September 25, 2017 12:32 pm  

Get one of those Michelin man dog bite suit thingies and have the kids all try to tackle you.

I see guys making blocking chutes out of pvc pipe all the time.  Why hasn't anyone done this yet?  :-


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Ronin
(@ronin1974)
Gold
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1492
September 26, 2017 5:20 am  

Gumby... I'm stealing that drill!

Coach Sugg, whose ball seems to be good for 'gang mentality'.  Tee Time (or Tee Up???) is a good drill for team tackling, but only two tacklers.  May not be what you are necessarily looking for.


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Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 9503
New Jersey
3rd - 5th
Asst Coach
September 26, 2017 5:32 am  

This is a team skill that needs to be learned, because it involves 3 elements in the following order of importance:

  • tacklers not knocking each other off
  • tacklers not letting the runner defeat them in a series of 1-on-1s
  • prying the ball loose

Gabe Infante showed for USA Football a non-contact way of having 2 tacklers approach together.  You just position them and then send them to a target in front of them or at an angle either away, where the targets are all set up & you call out which one to go to now.

I coach angle tackling with 2 more tacklers than the offense can acc't for, so positioned that one should prevent the runner from getting outside him.

Together these drills should teach them how to not get in each other's way and not let the runner escape.  If you want to add a 3rd tackler who can arrive after further delay, fine.  Ball stripping & recovery can also be coached with such drills.

Once they have assigned positions on defense, they need to learn each other's speed, so they don't wind up trying to go thru each other.  The trailing tackler needs not only to take an angle to meet the runner, but also an angle to avoid crashing into a slower teammate.

Until your players learn how not to knock each other off while tackling, pulling up when a teammate is making the tackle is a good thing.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17389
North Carolina
High School
September 26, 2017 5:35 am  

In our Pursuit Drill ("11 on the Ball"), we're looking to see how many tacklers we can get on the ball-carrier before he goes down, if you aren't in contact with the ball-carrier (or the pile) when his knee touches down, the defender has to touch (or slap, or knock in the head) the ball-carrier before he's able to get back to the huddle.  Our defenders loved doing this because of whether they were first or last to the pile, they got to hit the ball-carrier in some fashion.  Our ball-carriers hated this initially, but it just encouraged them to get back to the huddle sooner because if the ball-carrier returned to the huddle before the defensive player could "tag" him, the defensive player was fired (or had to do up/downs, push-ups, etc.) 

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9393
Coach
September 26, 2017 5:37 am  

Theres a drill we used to train hunting dogs in hawaii that im gonna use for football. When we hunt wild boar the coralling of the board is most important, kinda like gang tackling. More to come.

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17389
North Carolina
High School
September 26, 2017 5:47 am  

Below is from an old post I made that talks about our "Ball in the Ring" drill:

Our defensive philosophy is based on the sole reason that when we are tackling a ball-carrier; it is to get the ball back.  The physicality of our tackling is not to "send a message," but to get our opponent to cough up the football.  So when we do tackling drills, we do them in order to get the ball back.  Our emphasis on defensive pursuit, specifically our "11 on the ball" approach, gets our tacklers thinking about a "mugging" approach, where our defensive group arrives and we are all fighting the ball-carrier for possession.  In a variation of "Bull in the Ring," (we call it, "Ball in the Ring") take your ball-carrier and place him in the middle of a small circle surrounded by 11 defensive players.  On your signal, the ball-carrier can drop to the ground, or remain standing, but he has 30-45 seconds to hold on to the ball as he gets mugged by the other 11.  It's like a huge "whose ball" scrum, but with the ball-carrier getting used to being attacked.

We've done "Ball in the Ring" with as few as 5 defenders and as many as 11.  The drill serves as a constant reminder as to why we are out there on defense and what it's our job to do.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Coach E
(@coache)
Gold
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 1101
September 26, 2017 9:02 am  

                                        Coach
                                        |  |
                                        |  | full round

                                        ^ cone

                            ^                      ^

                      ^                                    ^

Tackler at each cone. All attack the bag on "Hit". Coach holds the bag up. Cone configuration ensures everyone gets there at different times. The first time you run it, the guys in back will "pull up" like you describe. Correct it loudly and immediately. Coaching point is to arrive with violence.

Point of the drill is to teach the first guy to the bag that he's going to get trucked by his teammates. . and that's okay. Also, the late comers learn that they are going to truck their teammate . . and that is also okay.

Change it up by running with the dummy left or right, adding an element of pursuit.

We used to add a "fumble" element to the drill by dropping a ball. I stopped doing that because you get some "vultures" who won't get in on the tackle because they're waiting for a ball to pop out.

My last year coaching we ran this drill. It was a great tool for finding out who was contact adverse.

The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.- Marcus Aurelius


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CoachSugg
(@coachsugg)
Silver
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 878
Head Coach
September 26, 2017 9:54 am  

                                        Coach
                                        |  |
                                        |  | full round

                                        ^ cone

                            ^                      ^

                      ^                                    ^

Tackler at each cone. All attack the bag on "Hit". Coach holds the bag up. Cone configuration ensures everyone gets there at different times. The first time you run it, the guys in back will "pull up" like you describe. Correct it loudly and immediately. Coaching point is to arrive with violence.

Point of the drill is to teach the first guy to the bag that he's going to get trucked by his teammates. . and that's okay. Also, the late comers learn that they are going to truck their teammate . . and that is also okay.

Change it up by running with the dummy left or right, adding an element of pursuit.

We used to add a "fumble" element to the drill by dropping a ball. I stopped doing that because you get some "vultures" who won't get in on the tackle because they're waiting for a ball to pop out.

Thanks Coach.  We worked this drill in yesterday along with a few others.

Kent Sugg
Bridge Creek, OK


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Coach Brad
(@coachbradfromcanada)
Bronze
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 458
October 18, 2017 6:43 pm  

I am just bumping this thread because I was looking for something similar, and there are a few great suggestions in this thread that I can't wait to try in practice.


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Test Account
(@test-account)
Kryptonite
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 13421
October 19, 2017 5:30 am  

Need help with drills to work on gang tackling.

Limited roster, have an issue with kids pulling up when a teammate is making a tackle.

Aggression training is in progress but need some specific work in this area.

Thanks in advance.

Time everything. They have x amount to do everything. And everybody pays if somebody slacks. So for a pursuit drill, the average play last how many seconds? 3? So everybody has 2 seconds to be within A YARD of the play?

Please don't PM or respond to this Member. It is an account for all of the posts from abandoned or banned Member Accounts.


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