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Kick-Out Block


C-Rob
(@tso1696)
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Do you have a favorite drill to teach the Kick-out block?  If so, could you share?

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CoachDP
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Using our X-Men approach, we start from the fit of the block itself, showing the blocker where we want the head and arms placement, as well as the body positioning and angle of the kick-out.  We work backwards from fit: Fit, then one step back, then three steps back, then from stance.  After fit, we have the "kickee" stand in place, holding a shield.  He is able to take the hit at full speed, although from 1 and then 3 steps away, it really isn't much of a hit.  After taking the hits from fit, 1 step, and 3 steps, we allow the "kickee" to move a bit so that he's no longer stationary and so that the blocker has to keep his eyes on his target, so that he doesn't "whiff."  Sometimes the "kickee" shows himself (and gets kicked), sometimes he penetrates too deep (taking himself out of the "play") so we can teach the kicker not to chase him, sometimes he doesn't show at all, so the kicker has to turn upfield.

We also work variations of a double-team kick-out, where the Fullback and the Quarterback kick-out; or the Fullback and Playside Guard kick-out, or the Fullback and the Backside Guard kick-out, or the Quarterback and the Playside Guard kick-out, or the Quarterback alone kicks-out.  They are many variations.  When we find a combination (or two) that we like, they will become a regular part of the KO Drill process, where we go full-speed with two kickers and allowing the "kickee" to come across the LOS at full-speed but carrying a shield.  The offense loves the double-team approach and when we have success in practice with this drill, we have many other players and positions begging us to give them the opportunity to work together.  

We are big on footwork and form running so that our linemen get comfortable running in space.  The faster they run, the bigger the hit.  At MCHS, our linemen used to breakout by calling "Fat boys on 3, Fat boys on 3!"  I put a stop to that because I don't want them to see themselves at "fat boys," but as elite athletes and that starts with running form and quick feet, just like the "Skills."

As we find which combinations work best, we'll carry two or three versions of our kick-outs into the season and saving the special double-team tags for Big Moment plays.

We sell the kick-out in much the way we sell Trap to our Backside Guard; they are looking to crack the guy inside out and putting themselves on the highlight video.

Trap has been our best running play this year.  Both Varsity and JV RBs have 7 TDs each through the first 3 games.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @tso1696

Do you have a favorite drill to teach the Kick-out block?  If so, could you share?

As I wrote above, you can see that our approach isn't a "favorite drill" for teaching the kick-out, but more of a step-by-step progression of teaching, including the various aspects and approach to the kick-out.  (Speed and footwork, angle and progression; I didn't even discuss how we coach the eyes.)  We've certainly moved away from a "favorite drill" as a one-size fits all/plug and play and have moved more towards a "these are the various components that we include in order to develop this one skill" (such as, the kick-out block).  This is one reason why I have moved to a 20-minute block approach to practices, as opposed to taking "as long as it takes to get what I want" approach.  I can build the kick-out progression over several days of practice, instead of burning an entire practice to teach, install and rep the kick-out.  The more years I have taught the kick-out, the more I see reason to include other aspects of what to include.

When I used to talk about "Tee Time," what I really should have discussed was a tackling progression.  "Tee Time" does you no good without already knowing how to tackle.  "Tee Time" is worthless when there are coaches who think the problem is that their kids are soft.

When Brian Jackson and I were on the phone about the P.A.I.N! Program, I discussed at length how P.A.I.N! is neither a drill, nor a plug&play install.  You have to be a coach.

When I discuss Double Wing install with a coach, he usually wants jump right into "What are the plays?" when he hasn't even considered cadence, motion, splits, blocking rules, stance, snap, hand-off or toss, whether to offset the Fullback, QB lead block, hockey-stick or boot leg, or running the staple play to more than one hole.  Having the answers to those and knowing the pros and cons of each, help you to not only understand the offense better, but what is really involved in running the system well.

I'm worn out by the Facebook gurus who think that coaching is about a scheme, a play or a drill and never mind the quality of each; you merely need to install it and that by itself will be the face-melter panacea for all that ills.

--Dave

 

 

 

 

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Coyote
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Posted by: @tso1696

Do you have a favorite drill to teach the Kick-out block? 

Kick-out is my fav block.   Got me off the bench and into the starting line-up my Jr. yr.  (long story)

Basically same progression as Dave describes, but for our kids (8-9 yrs olds) we recently added having the kickee (who is holding the shield) stand in front of some dummies lying on the ground for them to fall on.  [dummies are laying side by side at 90 degrees from kick-er's approach] 

One of the issues we’ve found is the tendency for the little guys to run to defender and stop their feet as they hit.  We want them to run thru kickee.   So we have the Kickee about 2 steps from the dummies, and - instead of hitting the kickee hoping he gets knocked back to the dummies -  emphasize making good contact and running the Kickee back to where he trips over the dummies and falls on them.  Like Dave, we start from 1 step from the kickee, then move further back.

Coaching point is to keep their feet moving thru the block.

After the 1st kickee falls on the dummies, the kids think its funny, and actually want to be the kickee.    Kids love the drill.

Hope this helps 

This post was modified 5 months ago 5 times by Coyote

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @coyote

One of the issues we’ve found is the tendency for the little guys to run to defender and stop their feet as they hit.  We want them to run thru kickee.

--Great point.  Often overlooked.  When we teach tackling, we have a contact point (the hittee) and a distance point (the cones where we expect you to move the tackle dummy to.)

After the 1st kickee falls on the dummies, the kids think its funny, and actually want to be the kickee.    Kids love the drill.

--This is the exact same experience when we go through our tackle progression.  Even when tackling 2-on-1 ("Twin Cannons") it's the player who gets knocked end over end who seems to have the most fun and wants to do it again.  It's the single, fastest way to get them over the issue of contact, because they are having fun being on either side of it.  It's the same mind-set as going on a rollercoaster ride: once they experience it and find that they "lived" through it, they want to ride it again because they know it's safe, even though it feels like it could be scary.  They learn to not only trust you, but trust themselves that this is something easily within their reach, so they want to experience it again.  

--Dave

 

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @coachdp
Posted by: @coyote

After the 1st kickee falls on the dummies, the kids think its funny, and actually want to be the kickee.    Kids love the drill.

--This is the exact same experience when we go through our tackle progression.  Even when tackling 2-on-1 ("Twin Cannons") it's the player who gets knocked end over end who seems to have the most fun and wants to do it again.  It's the single, fastest way to get them over the issue of contact, because they are having fun being on either side of it.  It's the same mind-set as going on a rollercoaster ride: once they experience it and find that they "lived" through it, they want to ride it again because they know it's safe, even though it feels like it could be scary.

 

This is why football is so popular among children, and why among adults it's almost exclusively a spectator sport.


That aside, seems to me having them use a shield implies a worst case scenario for kicking out an opponent.  The literature up to the middle of the 20th Century doesn't use the word or phrase "kick out", but just calls it a trap block.  It was predicated on the idea that most of the time the end wouldn't be crashing or angling in, but would be trying to box against a wide run, and therefore that you'd hit him in the side, which of course is much better from the blocker's point of view.  The only teams using the tandem kick-out were those that ran so much inside it that the opposing ends did wind up facing the blockers in anticipation.

Those of you trying to teach the kick-out with drills like this, are you trying to "live off-tackle"?  Like you're coming off tackle and you don't care if the opposing end knows it?


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tiger46
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Our process is about the same as Coyote's.  After the players get comfortable with being the 'kicker' and the 'kickee', we build from there.  We add a FB that takes a hand-off and runs behind the kick out blocker (pulling OL).  Pull right. Kick out with right shoulder. Pull left. Kick out with left shoulder. Let them get used to that. Create a LOS. Move the defender to a proper position- DE, or whatever.  DE crosses LOS and stops in front of the bags. Let the OL get used to that. And, then we tell the kickee that he doesn't have to just stand there and get kicked. We let him use his imagination about how to come across the LOS, avoid the kick out block and still tag the FB.  The kickee only has to tag the FB.  Admittedly, the defender is at a disadvantage since he's still holding a shield while he's trying to tag the FB. The OL slows down again as the they learn how to deal with hitting through a mobile target that doesn't just wait to get smacked. But, after awhile the blocker gets used to it (coach 'em up!) and starts hitting his target with speed and power again.  It also gives them a feel for when a tagger has moved himself out of position to make the tag. OL can turn up and find another target. We then use the FB as the kick out blocker, etc...

When we teach blocking we teach our players a mantra, "Before they can think! Before they can blink!" We want them to attack the defender with so much speed and aggression that the defender doesn't have a chance to counter the attack in any way.

This post was modified 5 months ago by tiger46

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men. ”  ― Frederick Douglass


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terrypjohnson
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Posted by: @tiger46

When we teach blocking we teach our players a mantra, "Before they can think! Before they can blink!" We want them to attack the defender with so much 

Stealing this!!

Fight 'em until Hell freezes over, then fight 'em on the ice -- Dutch Meyer


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Coyote
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Posted by: @bob-goodman

therefore that you'd hit him in the side, which of course is much better from the blocker's point of view. 

Hi Bob,

In our case, we're mostly trying to get the blocker who is kicking out, to approach, make contact, and run thru the DE in good form and safe technique.   For us, in this drill, a safe contact is more important than if the DE is being struck facing our DE (we mostly get boxed DE's who are facing us) or in the side.   We're a Buck and Belly wing-T team, and in our league the opposition tends to over-play the Bucksweep, locally the conventional wisdom says box the DE on the wing side.   We like that they think this will work.  In team "O" we usually have the DE we're kicking out have a shield - whether a kid or parent - and vary his depth and whether boxing, or angling (we have them angle slow for coaching purposes) to help the OG's to find a moving target.  Tho, sometimes the DE's are still standing where they initially aligned, I tend to think this is their kid not doing as he's coached to do, rather than the DC's intent.  

FWIW, a couple times we've had DE's run away from the OG's kick-out blocks and our kid went chasing after them... 🤣 

Posted by: @bob-goodman

Those of you trying to teach the kick-out with drills like this, are you trying to "live off-tackle"?

We do, though its as much in response to what the Defense's are giving us, as it is a preference. 

When I broke into coaching, Coach Maskill and Coach Streidle had both recently retired from their respective schools as winningest and 3rd winningest coaches in MI history.  I had played against both in the early '70's.   Coach Maskill's offensive philosophy was simple.  "If my fat boy moves your fat boy, RB has 5 yds."   Coach Streidle came at it defensively, "If you can't run off-tackle, you can't win."   This still colors my view of the game.  Granted they retired in the early '80's (Maskill came out of retirement after a few yrs, then retired for good in '91).  

At our level, most our competition lives off the sweep/ pitch and QB sneak / wedge.    Lotsa sweeps, pitches, reverses.  Looking for that big perimeter play, no one does much off-tackle.    Us being a wing-T team, and their own offensive thinking, teams tend to overload the perimeter to stop us - esp to the wing - so we run a ton of off-tackle...  most seasons our bread & butter is Buckshort.  Bucksweep action but the Blocking & the HB's POA is off-tackle instead of outside. The fun part is, our league competition often can't tell the difference, they think their doing something great keeping our RB's from the perimeter.  We let 'em think that... 

We've been very effective running Bucksweep to the open side away from the TE/WB [WB gets the ball],  But the Belly - esp to the quickside - is a chain movin', clock eatin' game winner for us, and breaks big quite often since the D either moves more bodies to the Wing, or puts more of their talent to wing side.  

But, that's just us, your mileage may vary...  😎 

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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Coyote
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Posted by: @tiger46

Pull right. Kick out with right shoulder. Pull left. Kick out with left shoulder

Great coaching point.  We keep reminding the kids all season, kick right, shoulder right, kick left shoulder left.  So often a couple of our qb's over the yrs started calling the play then adding it as if it were part of the play call.

 
Posted by: @tiger46

When we teach blocking we teach our players a mantra, "Before they can think! Before they can blink!" We want them to attack the defender with so much 

Stealing this!!

Me, Too.   Thanx Coach.

This post was modified 5 months ago by Coyote

Umm.... why does that 6 ft tall 9 yr old have a goatee...?


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COACHDT
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One of the issues we’ve found is the tendency for the little guys to run to defender and stop their feet as they hit.  We want them to run thru kickee.   

I call these "LOOK WHAT I HAVE DONE!" blocks.  I first show them what I dont want. I will be the blocker I will run into another coach. I will stop my feet and I will beat my chest and hold my arms out and scream "LOOK WHAT I HAVE DONE!".  Mean while the defender(the other coach) has bounced off of me and wrapped up the runner.  

Everyone then laughs at me, but the kids get that if they bounce off their block and don't keep their feet moving their man will make the tackle.  In a game all I need to say is  "Hey Johnny!, Look what I have done." And he knows what he is doing wrong.

Other than that I teach it the same as above.  But showing them what not to do is just as important as showing them what you want.

 


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C-Rob
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@coachdp can you please elaborate on what you teach concerning head and hand placement?

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CoachDP
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Posted by: @tso1696

@coachdp can you please elaborate on what you teach concerning head and hand placement?

It's an X-Men block with the kicker's head in the hole.  His head is not part of the block, but by getting the head "inside," it assures that their body is shaded to the inside and cutting off the alley for the defender.  Simple block because they don't have to chase a defender; just make sure that we're cutting off the alley so the defender can't make the tackle.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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