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Plyometric experiment  

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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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October 23, 2017 10:44 am  

Season isn't over for us. Playoffs start Saturday, but after 8 games, 2 jamborees and 3 or 4 full on scrimmages, here are the anecdotal early returns for our revised warm ups. We can argue all we want about whether this constitutes a "warm up" or not. I'll concede the point. At the end of it, our boys are "warm".

At Mahonz' suggestion, my son, who is an elite hockey player came up with a conditioning routine that we replaced our normal dynamic warm up with.  Last season, by game 6, we were the walking wounded. Lots of dings and "owie's" that our guys seemed to really dwell on. On top of that, we had about a half dozen soft tissue injuries that kept kids out of practices and games. In our playoff game, we were down to our 3rd or 4th RB and our defense was decimated. We were dragged up and down the field by our opponent and got our asses handed to us in the "mojo" department.

We have 1 RB who had a nagging rib injury, but seems to be close to 100%. Hard to tell, because he won't admit he's hurt until he pretty much can't breathe. If anyone has a rib conditioning exercise, I'm all ears.

Our QB/Mike has traditionally been "soft" when it comes to injuries. He's a head taller than most and gets hit in the legs a lot. This year, he hasn't missed a snap due to being hurt. He commented to me last week about how good his legs feel.

It has gotten back to me that this routine is extremely unpopular among the players. One of our LBs asked me at half time on Saturday why we do them. I asked him how many guys we've lost to sprained ankles/knees or thigh bruises.  He thought about it for a minute, then smiled and replied, "zero".

Another team in our club is the only team that has beaten us. They just got hammered 34-0 by a team who finished 4-4. The primary reason is that they had 3 key players out with lower leg injuries and a 4th with a concussion. The 4th had nothing to do with conditioning, but the other 3 puts them in the same boat we were in last season.

My son and I did change up the routine in mid season. This is what we do:

Static (duration is set by Captain):
Squat Jumps
Elbow to hand push ups
Planks
Flutter kicks

Linear (20 yards):
Skip for height
Left leg hops
Right leg hops
Frog Hops
Bounds (x2)
Spider man crawls (1/2)
Lunge Jumps
Sprint from prone (thanks Zach)

From there we do the Meat Grinder, 1/2 lap of bellies and finish with a buzz/react/hit the full round drill.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 22981
October 23, 2017 11:04 am  

This routine has been a Godsend for the MS level player.

Im convinced of this now. We are noticeably faster, stronger and more importantly...healthier.

I have had a few players complain too. My reply....football is hard.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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Coach Brad
(@coachbradfromcanada)
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Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 458
October 23, 2017 11:16 am  

We essentially do a more condensed version of that.

Every stretch is done for 10 yards, then jog/run for 10 yards.

Lunge, backwards lunge, side lunge, knee hugs, A-skips, Supermans, bearcrawl, sprint 20 yards.

That takes 5 minutes, then Angle Form Tackling for 5 minutes.

In 10 mins they are now warmed up, loose, and had a little contact to get the blood flowing. Usually go right into the full contact portion of practice right after this, then team stuff later.

Haven't had a player miss a game yet for an injury resulting at practice or a game. This is my first year with 10/11 yo's having previous only coached 12/13 yo's. I have noticed a HUGE difference in the number of players that go down on the field during a game, having to coming out for the 3 plays. Most of them are good to go shortly after. None have sustained an injury to keep them out for more than a quarter. This happens just as often to the other teams, so I am willing to chalk it up to just being younger players who have a lower pain tolerance than the older kids and still need to find out the difference between an "owie" and an injury, and realize the the pain is temporary and will go away in a matter of a few minutes.


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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Posts: 17466
North Carolina
High School
October 23, 2017 3:24 pm  

I am willing to chalk it up to just being younger players who have a lower pain tolerance than the older kids and still need to find out the difference between an "owie" and an injury, and realize the the pain is temporary and will go away in a matter of a few minutes.

^ Bingo.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Wing-n-It
(@robert)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 3872
United States
October 23, 2017 3:31 pm  

My son and I did change up the routine in mid season. This is what we do:

Static (duration is set by Captain):
Squat Jumps
Elbow to hand push ups
Planks
Flutter kicks

Linear (20 yards):
Skip for height
Left leg hops
Right leg hops
Frog Hops
Bounds (x2)
Spider man crawls (1/2)
Lunge Jumps
Sprint from prone (thanks Zach)

From there we do the Meat Grinder, 1/2 lap of bellies and finish with a buzz/react/hit the full round drill.

Can some of us newbies get some slight explanation on the bolded?
Please

2 Things my offense will always have is a Wing and a Wedge


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jrk5150
(@jrk5150)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 6431
October 24, 2017 3:27 am  

Actually Gumby - you started the thread, why don't you put an explanation of all of the exercises you're doing?


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Vince148
(@vince148)
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Posts: 2337
October 24, 2017 3:56 am  

I personally feel that one of the biggest reasons that we see more "injuries" at the lower levels is because of a lack of serious strength training at that level. It's bad enough that kids today are "soft" due to a severe lack of physical activity and ridiculous PE programs, but then to expect them to play in an extremely physical environment such as football with no strength program is absolutely absurd. There are those with the train of thought that think all a kid needs to do is be a kid and play other sports. That's good enough. It's not! Other sports might help them develop muscle coordination and motor skills, but it takes resistance to build strength. I always get a kick out of parents who let their kids play football, but are concerned that their kid would get injured lifting weights. Anybody else see the ridulousness of that? I have started kids out weight training from 11 years old. That seems to be a good age where they are starting to be more focused and serious about their endeavors. But there are lots of things that can be done to make 8-10 year olds strong as well that don't involve weight training or excessive loading. I think that youth football could be a whole lot safer if kids were more physically prepared before the season starts.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Posts: 4180
October 24, 2017 4:50 am  

Elbow to hand pushups: start in the "up" position. Go down to your elbows one at a time, then down to your chest. Then up to your elbows one at a time, then up to the "up" position.

Sprints from prone: Sprints starting from the push up "down" position. We go to a line and back, touching the ground past the line.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4180
October 24, 2017 4:54 am  

I personally feel that one of the biggest reasons that we see more "injuries" at the lower levels is because of a lack of serious strength training at that level. It's bad enough that kids today are "soft" due to a severe lack of physical activity and ridiculous PE programs, but then to expect them to play in an extremely physical environment such as football with no strength program is absolutely absurd. There are those with the train of thought that think all a kid needs to do is be a kid and play other sports. That's good enough. It's not! Other sports my help them develop muscle coordination and motor skills, but it takes resistance to build strength. I always get a kick out of parents who let their kids play football, but are concerned that their kid would get injured lifting weights. Anybody else see the ridulousness of that? I have started kids out weight training from 11 years old. That seems to be a good age where they are starting to be more focused and serious about their endeavors. But their are lots of things that can be done to make 8-10 year olds strong as well that don't involve weight training or excessive loading. I think that youth football could be a whole lot safer if kids were more physically prepared before the season starts.

As I said, my son developed this from his hockey conditioning. They call it "dry land" and he's been doing it since he was about 9. Some coaches had the teams doing dry land before every practice and game. The ones before practice were much more intense.

I agree 100% with the weight training. Competitive youth power lifting is the #1 safest sport per participant hours.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 22981
October 24, 2017 6:57 am  

Actually Gumby - you started the thread, why don't you put an explanation of all of the exercises you're doing?

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Posts: 4180
October 24, 2017 7:28 am  

br>

Glad you didn't film the one where I got punched in the nachos.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Posts: 4180
November 15, 2017 11:16 am  

Final results:

Zero injuries through the playoffs. They seemed to be as fresh as week 1 in the championship.

Meat Grinder:
We pitched a shutout in "Mojo Score". Didn't have to visit the field a single time all season. That's a first for me. Opponent totals were in the mid to upper 20's.

We'll have an off-season conversation about 2nd graders. Anyone have any good information about the benefits of plyometrics with 8 year olds?

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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mahonz
(@mahonz)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 22981
November 15, 2017 11:20 am  

Final results:

Zero injuries through the playoffs. They seemed to be as fresh as week 1 in the championship.

Meat Grinder:
We pitched a shutout in "Mojo Score". Didn't have to visit the field a single time all season. That's a first for me. Opponent totals were in the mid to upper 20's.

We'll have an off-season conversation about 2nd graders. Anyone have any good information about the benefits of plyometrics with 8 year olds?

These stats blew my mind this season. Many thanks to both you and Mini Gumby. It was a HUGE success.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


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Monster
(@monster)
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Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 1244
December 28, 2017 7:53 am  

...

We'll have an off-season conversation about 2nd graders. Anyone have any good information about the benefits of plyometrics with 8 year olds?

Very interested in hearing about this if you get any info Gumby.

Mission Statement: To make a genuine effort at every opportunity to help those around me build and maintain a commitment to success.


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gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
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Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4180
December 28, 2017 8:32 am  

Very interested in hearing about this if you get any info Gumby.

Will do. “Conventional” wisdom says they this is too early, but years ago Jack Gregory shared an interesting website called “Strong Kids” that talks about the benefits and almost zero downside of weight training and even powerlifting as a competitive sport with very young children. I’ll start researching it soon.

Unfortunately, I can’t seem to find that website. I’ve found similar ones, with similar names, but this one had research behind it.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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