Notifications

Tackling drills - How much contact  

  RSS

Vince148
(@vince148)
Gold
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 2337
October 5, 2017 5:23 am  

When you do tackling drills, how much contact do you do?

After our warmups, I would do tackle fits from knees, then move into a tackling circuit that was mostly full speed and bring the runner down. The circuit would be angle tackling from 5 yards apart, 3-lane drill, and a perimeter open field tackle drill that focused on lateral movement.

Do you prefer your tackling drills to be slower speed, no tackling, fits only or full speed and contact?


Quote
gumby_in_co
(@gumby_in_co)
Platinum
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 4149
October 5, 2017 5:46 am  

We don't do them very often, but when we do, it's full tilt, but very limited space. For the bigs, we give them 1 yard early on and might increase that to 2 yards by the end of the season. We give the smaller guys more space. Maybe up to 3-4 yards. We've been doing it this way since they were 6th graders. When we drop down to 2nd grade next fall, there will probably be a lot more tackle drills and there will be a crawl/walk/run progression with the goal of going full tilt as soon as they can do it safely.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17405
North Carolina
High School
October 5, 2017 5:56 am  

When you do tackling drills, how much contact do you do?

Depends on the drill.

We either tackle bags, popsicle sticks or people holding shields.  We do NO live tackling (tackler vs. ball-carrier) at practice (in either scrimmages or drills).  In scrimmages, every defensive player holds a shield.  We go full-speed and are looking for our defenders to just blow up plays or ball-carriers while holding the shields.  The defense hates it, but they hit even harder using the shields because everything becomes a kill-shot.  We aren't worried about injuries this way; for us, most injuries happen when taking someone to the ground, or we get a helmet-to-helmet.  The shields help prevent this.  We did not use this approach in youth ball.  But we still have a lot of contact in practice; perhaps just as much as we had in youth ball.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
patriotsfatboy1
(@patriotsfatboy1)
Platinum
Joined: 7 years ago
Posts: 3255
October 5, 2017 8:07 am  

We do tackling on dummies in indy's with dummies and wheels as part of a circuit.  Then we do 10-15 minutes of a tackling drill whereby we have full contact with distance between players being managed.  That happens 2-3 times per week. 


ReplyQuote
ZACH
 ZACH
(@bucksweep58)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9395
Coach
October 5, 2017 9:26 am  

1hour def practice
15 min of thud/form
15-20 of live football situation drills. ---Oklahoma 1v2, 2v2, 3v3,or 5v4.
Eye opener 1v2
Goal line 1v1

Or

We run a defensive gauntlet i took from an lsu video.

I think you should have full contact often... conditions the body and mind. We change up betweem, live tackling, live hitting aka gauntlet style,  sumo, or some just brute force drill no form, and live football.

We do 7v7 on offense and 9v7 but its live to thud.

As far as in general...i dont do live until at least half my team can tackle properly and i still use dc46 tackle progression to judge this. Once half can pass it they can live tackle and the desire to also hit live fuels the ones not yet ready.

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


ReplyQuote
J. Potter (seabass)
(@seabass)
Gold
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1249
October 5, 2017 9:43 am  

We tackle everyday...first practice to the last practice....20 minutes. Some against bags, some against physio balls, some against each other. We don't tackle to the ground every day but we hit live people to some degree everyday.

We create the match ups early in the season but by this point in the season you hit whoever you end up matched against....regardless of size or ability. We have 21 on our roster. Aside form the girl we have, every kid can handle every other kid on our team.

We spend a great deal of time on pursuit with wrap and run.


ReplyQuote
Coach Brad
(@coachbradfromcanada)
Bronze
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 458
October 5, 2017 3:16 pm  

We are mid-season, so as little as 15 minutes of full contact per practice during the week (2 practices) and no full contact on Saturday practices, day before the game. When we run team vs. scout, it full speed on the line but just wrap and freeze on the ball carrier. Plus angle form tackling every practice, but just fit & freeze.

Keeps the bumps and bruises down, and come game time they are not worn out, in fact are craving that contact (most of them anyways).


ReplyQuote
Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 9504
New Jersey
3rd - 5th
Asst Coach
October 8, 2017 6:40 am  

Depends on the drill.

That's my answer too.  Some drills could be considered tackling-and-pursuit (not in that order  😉 ) drills, and in that case the actual tackling is optional.  This past week I introduced our team to sideline tackling, which our HC thought had too much contact, but basically it's a pursuit drill, and I can run it as a touch version as well -- in fact that's how I was introduced to it in 2007 in the Co-Op City Cowboys.

With 9Us I would be disappointed if we didn't do at least some full-contact tackling at least weekly.  I don't believe in practicing tackling "thud" style (which USA Football considers part of "full contact") because I think it's detrimental to form, plus I wouldn't trust my ability to control it safely.  We do some drills & scrimmages with "thud" style tackling where I am now, but those aren't tackling drills.  I think other coaches I've coached with or under agree that once you've worked on form with a dummy and/or other players in some less-than-full contact mode and the players have graduated from it, you don't go back to less-than-full contact for tackling drills during that season unless one or more players needs remedial work.

Some day we may have equipment that adequately simulates the full-contact experience that players can train on.  Until then, for me it's body vs. body for tackling, & go thru with the whole motion.  If that's too much contact, then don't drill tackling as often.  Pursuit, however, can be done without contact.  Gabe Infante for USA Football showed a good 2-pursuer drill where they just run up to a cone (although I'd prefer a dummy), and a reaction drill where you square up as if for contact but the tackler & runner keep daylight between them.  I don't consider those tackling drills.


ReplyQuote
davecisar
(@davecisar)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7679
October 9, 2017 5:48 am  

Depends on the drill.

We either tackle bags, popsicle sticks or people holding shields.  We do NO live tackling (tackler vs. ball-carrier) at practice (in either scrimmages or drills).  In scrimmages, every defensive player holds a shield.  We go full-speed and are looking for our defenders to just blow up plays or ball-carriers while holding the shields.  The defense hates it, but they hit even harder using the shields because everything becomes a kill-shot.  We aren't worried about injuries this way; for us, most injuries happen when taking someone to the ground, or we get a helmet-to-helmet.  The shields help prevent this.  We did not use this approach in youth ball.  But we still have a lot of contact in practice; perhaps just as much as we had in youth ball.

--Dave

Dave

You dont do any of your tee time or 10 yard fight type drills during the season?

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17405
North Carolina
High School
October 9, 2017 6:14 am  

You dont do any of your tee time or 10 yard fight type drills during the season?

Tee Time doesn't get used anymore at high school and 10-Yard Fight uses shields, so that one's stayed in the rotation.  Other drills like The Executioner or Twin Cannons has stayed because we incorporate shields.  With the number of injuries we have in high school, we really can't afford full-contact/go to the ground type of drills. 

--DP

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
Vince148
(@vince148)
Gold
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 2337
October 9, 2017 8:20 am  

With the number of injuries we have in high school, we really can't afford full-contact/go to the ground type of drills. 

--DP

This was one of the reasons I started this thread. In one of our last practices, we had a kid break his arm while doing our angle tackling drill from just 5 yards apart. It's causing me to rethink how much contact we need during practice.


ReplyQuote
J. Potter (seabass)
(@seabass)
Gold
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 1249
October 9, 2017 11:15 am  

Sometimes stuff just happens. We had a kid break his leg in the first contact drill of the season. We were just easing into contact, it wasn't even a tackle to the ground type of drill. His cleat grabbed while he was off balance and his tibia was the weak link.


ReplyQuote
davecisar
(@davecisar)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7679
October 9, 2017 2:23 pm  

This was one of the reasons I started this thread. In one of our last practices, we had a kid break his arm while doing our angle tackling drill from just 5 yards apart. It's causing me to rethink how much contact we need during practice.

IF I only had 12-13 players- I would seriously reconsider going all mojo in practices

We hit but we dont overdo it and weve had zero practice injuries that have kept our kids out of games this year and the last 3-4

If you have a huge, deep team- maybe rethink it

That approach does have a tendancy to run off a lot of MPRs- so that is a positive for some guys

However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results.Winston Churchill


ReplyQuote
mahonz
(@mahonz)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 22976
October 9, 2017 2:45 pm  

This was one of the reasons I started this thread. In one of our last practices, we had a kid break his arm while doing our angle tackling drill from just 5 yards apart. It's causing me to rethink how much contact we need during practice.

Im with seabass. Not an extreme drill you were running so cant fear contact due to one unfortunate incident.

What is beautiful, lives forever.


ReplyQuote
CoachDP
(@coachdp)
Kryptonite
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 17405
North Carolina
High School
October 9, 2017 7:17 pm  

We lost a player today with what we think is a broken clavicle.  He was blocking while holding a shield.  His backup is out for the season with torn ligaments.  Both were offensive linemen.  Here's how we stack up now:

C--5'9" 190
G--5'6" 190
G--5'8" 172
T--5'7" 150
T--5'8" 172

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


ReplyQuote
Share: