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Warmups


jtrent64
(@jtrent64)
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What is your approach to warm ups?  Previously we have been pretty traditional, in 5 lines stretching, doing some dynamics. and boring. Then jump into some bag work.

I am at the 4th grade level now, I don't think these kids need much stretching, so I am curious on what you do on the first 15 minutes of practice.  Just Dynamic warmups like high knees, that stuff?

One coach I know does form tackling circuit as his warmup and start of practice.

Jog a lap?  (not a fan)

Thoughts?

 


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J. Potter (seabass)
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Nobody needs stretching…anything to get the nervous system primed. We use football stuff to get ready for practice. We start practice with a special teams circuit. It’s 4 stations that change based on the day’s emphasis…KOR, KOC, punt or punt return. It takes about 10 minutes with 4 coaches. 

 


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gumby_in_co
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Form tackling circuit. Early in the season (like the first week) when I'm teaching tackling, we will take them to the ground. Once we are satisfied with the install, we'll stop them just short of going to the ground. I teach hawk tackling with 3 variations: drive for 5; single leg; gator roll.

I think we understand that you warm up by doing controlled movements that simulate "football movements". What is more "football" than tackling? Saves me 15 minutes per practice and makes us very good tacklers. I have Zach to thank for this. It was his idea.

When in doot . . . glass and oot.


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CoachDP
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Posted by: @jtrent64

What is your approach to warm ups?

We Sprint, Backwards Sprint (not a backpedal), High Knee and Butt Kick.  We use these because I emphasize form running and each of these incorporates my approach to form running.  We also incorporate a turn/cadence where each player approaches their line with their back to me so that when I shout "Turn!" they all turn to their right to face me (we break the huddle by all turning to the right).  Each exercise is started on cadence and ball-movement (sometimes it matches, sometimes it doesn't).  If you are off-sides or move before the snap, you make your group do up-downs (the offender doesn't do them; he gives the instrux).  Of the four players on the front line, whoever is last off the line (in sprints/backwards sprints/high knees/butt kickers) has to come back and go again.  

I often talk casually to the players about a variety of subjects while the cadence/ball snap is going on in an attempt to distract them.  

Players practice with their heads aimed to the "backfield" (behind the coach who plays "Center") while their eyes can still see the football movement out of the corner of their eyes.  We don't teach or use the phrase, "Watch the ball!" because I want them looking to see where they are going; not staring at a football and then having to redirect their head or eyes.

With this approach, we are teaching form running, cadence, going on ball movement, punishment if moving to soon, and having to start over if slow (last) off the line.  This requires focus, attention, anticipation and intensity (something I rarely see in most warmup periods).

We conclude warm-ups with Battle Buddies simply because it's physical and usually starts getting players upset with each other.

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

#BattleReady newhope


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @gumby_in_co

I think we understand that you warm up by doing controlled movements that simulate "football movements". What is more "football" than tackling?

Exactly.  (Or blocking, or something else.)  And it doesn't bore the kids.


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ZACH
 ZACH
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I've been back and forth on this, at a strength and conditioning summit this winter I was sold on what I had deemed "unnecessary". 

The warm beyond raising core temperature and focus is a great way to keep your athletes healthy.  Having conditioned joints, mobility, and ability in different planes of motion will keep the athlete strong and resilient. 

 

The warm up I use with the high school kids prior to lifts, they are gonna use a variant at practice which I'm stoked about. 

Run : 400m or 1 lap, time limit 2:30 if you miss it you run another lineman need to complete in 3 min, depending on age ide say use 3 min. 

Dynamic : movement patterns, forward, backward, lateral. Joint flexion of the ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder. Transition of forward, lateral, and backward running. Walk to sprint, jog to sprint, jog , sprint, direction change.  All these are done in a 10 m distance. 

Strength : hand release push up (thumbs against the ribs) , Indian sit up, Hindu squat (hands should be able to touch grass as they swing there arms).  *pull ups are used during workouts only. Start at 5 reps of each and increase by 5 every week. Your kids will be stronger at the end of the season when it counts most. 

 

Skill : this is what I would in a youth team environment.  Stance, start, block, leverage progression. Stance, pursuit,fit, thud tackle progression. 

Contact:  a drill with minimal distance between the players with as little variables as possible to get the kids hitting each other and priming themselves for contact.  Simple drill of banging shoulders from a stance and cadence would suffice.

 

Each day of this your warm up period will be faster. As they get to know the drills the pace quickens.  There should be sweat but not fatigue, should be fast but not sloppy. Force your kids to do the movements correctly and with as little anxiety as possible. 

 

Use this for every practice and game. For the game minimize or remove strength aspect or cut the reps in half. 

 

 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @bucksweep58

The warm beyond raising core temperature and focus is a great way to keep your athletes healthy.  Having conditioned joints, mobility, and ability in different planes of motion will keep the athlete strong and resilient.  

Three questions.  First, does it actually increase "focus" in children?

Second, I know there are data going back almost a century that an excess of football injuries occur in the first few minutes with no warm-ups.  But those were in high schoolers, during the season, and led to the adoption, first in 6-man and then in NFHS, of a requirement to be on the field (theoretically warming up) for a few minutes before resumption of play after the half-time interval.  Are there any data that warmups reduce injuries in pre-adolescents in pre-season?

Third, if warming up actually does reduce injuries in children, would that be achievable by simply starting each drill half speed, instead of using some other exercise to warm up with?


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ZACH
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Posted by: @bob-goodman
Posted by: @bucksweep58

The warm beyond raising core temperature and focus is a great way to keep your athletes healthy.  Having conditioned joints, mobility, and ability in different planes of motion will keep the athlete strong and resilient.  

Three questions.  First, does it actually increase "focus" in children?

Second, I know there are data going back almost a century that an excess of football injuries occur in the first few minutes with no warm-ups.  But those were in high schoolers, during the season, and led to the adoption, first in 6-man and then in NFHS, of a requirement to be on the field (theoretically warming up) for a few minutes before resumption of play after the half-time interval.  Are there any data that warmups reduce injuries in pre-adolescents in pre-season?

Third, if warming up actually does reduce injuries in children, would that be achievable by simply starting each drill half speed, instead of using some other exercise to warm up with?

Regarding focus: 

When the body heart rate elevates there's increase I'm hormonal response, adrenaline amongst them.  All of which creates mental alertness I'm the beginning stages of the heart rate increase hence the lap. 

 

Data is skewed in every study when it comes to the movement of the human body, too many variables.  The dynamic portion of my warm up forces joints to move through a range of motion slowly then dynamically.  This increase tendon, ligament, and muscular conditioning and resilience.  Us meat head call it general physical preparedness and specific physical preparedness. The strength portion is a way to keep the upper half strong and accomplish the same as the prominently lower body heavy dynamic warm up. 

 

Lastly yes you want to start slow then increase pace based on the technique achieved.  I think JJs play install is a great example, talk..walk..jog..run.  Don't advance to the next speed until the previous was done the way it's intended.

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @bucksweep58
 
Regarding focus: 

When the body heart rate elevates there's increase I'm hormonal response, adrenaline amongst them.  All of which creates mental alertness I'm the beginning stages of the heart rate increase hence the lap.

This is the opposite of my personal experience.  Just anticipating what's coming, my head is already there.  Then as soon as I start breathing hard from exercise, that diverts circulation from my brain, and I feel dulled.

That's neither here nor there when it comes to practice, because I'm going to get there anyway.  But it does say that any pre-exercise would be useless in activating my mind.

This post was modified 4 months ago by Bob Goodman

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ZACH
 ZACH
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Posted by: @bob-goodman
Posted by: @bucksweep58
 
Regarding focus: 

When the body heart rate elevates there's increase I'm hormonal response, adrenaline amongst them.  All of which creates mental alertness I'm the beginning stages of the heart rate increase hence the lap.

This is the opposite of my personal experience.  Just anticipating what's coming, my head is already there.  Then as soon as I start breathing hard from exercise, that diverts circulation from my brain, and I feel dulled.

That's neither here nor there when it comes to practice, because I'm going to get there anyway.  But it does say that any pre-exercise would be useless in activating my mind.

Welp increased circulation improves synapse ability and integrity. Maybe if you weren't fatigued or in above couch surfing shape youde understand the benefit .

 

But please do what you like. 

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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