Notifications
Clear all

Center good at snapping not at blocking


FBFalcons
(@fbfalcons)
Copper
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 42
Topic starter  

I have a new center that handles snapping ( direct/indirect ) like a charm...problem is that he is getting beat by the noseguard most of the time and he steps back too much.....should I have him crab or try to find another center ? I worked on him snapping and firing out with short choppy steps but he seems to overthink what he is doing......


Quote
Michael
(@michael)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 12890
 

I have a new center that handles snapping ( direct/indirect ) like a charm...problem is that he is getting beat by the noseguard most of the time and he steps back too much.....should I have him crab or try to find another center ? I worked on him snapping and firing out with short choppy steps but he seems to overthink what he is doing......

Do you always have a defender over him when he practices snapping?

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


ReplyQuote
FBFalcons
(@fbfalcons)
Copper
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 42
Topic starter  

every practice he does 15 snaps with no one over him and then we use a shield and then a live person....he gets ripped and swam by the ng in practice......probably will just have him crab and grab......


ReplyQuote
Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9631
 

every practice he does 15 snaps with no one over him and then we use a shield and then a live person....he gets ripped and swam by the ng in practice......probably will just have him crab and grab......

Actually I think with 8Us if the DL has to rip some of the time and swim some of the time to get by him (i.e. varying his technique), that's pretty good blocking!  Not many 8Us will be good at both of those techniques.  Of course I'd have to be there to really make a judgment, but your standards may be too high.


ReplyQuote
Michael
(@michael)
Kryptonite
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 12890
 

Actually, our centers almost never fire out, if ever.  They flat step or even open up, sometimes as much as 90 degrees.

If they fired out regularly we'd miss a lot of blocks.

Michael can not receive PM's, emails or respond to Posts. He passed away in September 2018. To honor his contributions we are leaving his account active. R.I.P - Dumcoach Staff.


ReplyQuote
Joker number 8
(@joker-number-8)
Silver
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 733
 

had a wonderful snapper who was automatic.  He just cut every defender. Called him armadillo. We were 0 line splits so he did not have much space to cover. Much to the chagrin of Coach C-Rob, we could not wedge block though. 

Todd

Todd


ReplyQuote
Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9631
 

had a wonderful snapper who was automatic.  He just cut every defender. Called him armadillo. We were 0 line splits so he did not have much space to cover. Much to the chagrin of Coach C-Rob, we could not wedge block though.

Was he your apex in the wedge?  What form did you use -- shoulder into what part of the teammate's body?


ReplyQuote
CoachCalande
(@www-coachcalande-com)
Diamond
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 7059
 

In the golden age of football, many teams went to the unbalanced line because of weak blocking good snapping centers.  I suggest you follow that lead.  don't put him on an island.

MOJO    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtcRmKnRcsA

Go to WWW.COACHCALANDE.COM  for Double Wing DVDs, Playbook, Drills Manuals, Practice footage and emagazines. Ask me about our new 38 special dvds!


ReplyQuote
Dusty Ol Fart
(@youth-coach)
Diamond
Joined: 8 years ago
Posts: 7701
 

In the golden age of football, many teams went to the unbalanced line because of weak blocking good snapping centers.  I suggest you follow that lead.  don't put him on an island.

THIS ^^^

Not MPP... ONE TASK!  Teach them!  🙂


ReplyQuote
hharris
(@hharris)
Bronze
Joined: 9 years ago
Posts: 123
 

Make sure he is stepping with his play side foot first.  If the play is going left, step with your left foot first.  If the play is going right, step with that foot first.  It should be a short power step at an angle as Michael stated.  Try to get him to understand that if he can get to the defenders body before the defender can get his hands on him then he will win most battles (Shoulder or hand blocking).  In addition, staying lower than the defender will build leverage.  Make sure his head gets between the defender and the ball carrier if he is shoulder blocking.  If he can get his head across, he can then use those short choppy steps to turn the defender.

After he masters this, teach him how to drive and pancake using the same basic first step.


ReplyQuote
Bob Goodman
(@bob-goodman)
Diamond
Joined: 10 years ago
Posts: 9631
 

If he's snapping one handed, learning to step 1st with the play side foot will be easier for 1 foot than the other.  It's easier for a right hander to step 1st with the left foot and vice versa.  I don't know whether the answer is to drill more the harder direction or to lower expectations for him in that direction, probably depends more on how much time he has available to work on it.  Or you could change the steps.


ReplyQuote
Share: