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Steps to contact on shoulder combo?


shawnm
(@shawnm)
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Ideally, on which step does the O-lineman typically contact the D-lineman? 

This is how I've been teaching this scenario:

Right side Double Team T/TE double team:   DT head up on T ,  TE down blocks to combo.  (Zero splits)   

(Right T steps):  6" left foot step slightly to the left, 6" power step while slamming right shoulder into the defenders midsection and drive hip to hip with TE. 

(Right TE steps): 6" left foot Step 45 deg down, 6" Right step, slam left shoulder into defenders Hip and pin hip to hip with Tackle?

 

In this scenario the T makes contact as his right foot comes down (2nd step) with good power slamming right shoulder into the defender.    If the TE wants to hit with power ideally he hits the DT on his 3rd step unless you teach the TE to lead with his right foot then you'd want him to hit when the left foot plants (left foot / left shoulder hit)?

Should I teach my TE to combo block with a right foot first step on a down double team block or maybe just overthinking.  

 

This topic was modified 2 months ago by shawnm

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CoachDP
(@coachdp)
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Posted by: @shawnm

Should I teach my TE to combo block with a right foot first step on a down double team block or maybe just overthinking.   

Generally speaking, there is a school of thought that tells the blocker, "If you get your first two steps down before the defender does, you'll win."  Oh, if only it were that simple. 🤔 

If your TE is down-blocking on a combo, why would you have him step over and cross his feet?  ("Should I teach my TE to combo block with a right foot first step...")

--Dave

"The Greater the Teacher, the More Powerful the Player."

The Mission Statement: "I want to show any young man that he is far tougher than he thinks, that he can accomplish more than what he dreamed and that his work ethic will take him wherever he wants to go."

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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @shawnm

Ideally, on which step does the O-lineman typically contact the D-lineman? 

This is how I've been teaching this scenario:

Right side Double Team T/TE double team:   DT head up on T ,  TE down blocks to combo.  (Zero splits)   

(Right T steps):  6" left foot step slightly to the left, 6" power step while slamming right shoulder into the defenders midsection and drive hip to hip with TE. 

(Right TE steps): 6" left foot Step 45 deg down, 6" Right step, slam left shoulder into defenders Hip and pin hip to hip with Tackle?

 

In this scenario the T makes contact as his right foot comes down (2nd step) with good power slamming right shoulder into the defender.    If the TE wants to hit with power ideally he hits the DT on his 3rd step unless you teach the TE to lead with his right foot then you'd want him to hit when the left foot plants (left foot / left shoulder hit)?

Should I teach my TE to combo block with a right foot first step on a down double team block or maybe just overthinking.

You're coaching it about the same way I would for a 2-on-1 drive block, except that since you're starting with 0 split, you can omit the sideways step to get hips together that I coach.

However, in a situation as you describe it, I wouldn't try for a drive block.  If the DT hasn't been slanting, I want the OT to post him up.  Just hit him low and fast any way you can, no matter which hip is supplying the force at the moment, and then use your opposite foot to get under him while extending both knees to raise the opponent's shoulders.  If you insist on the DT's using his own shoulders to hit with, fine, but hands blocking is really good for this too.  Just don't get your head on the DT's left side, because that's where the TE is hitting.

The TE should step first with the right foot at sufficient angle to face his hips toward the DT's near shoulder.  Then he should come up with his left shoulder while stepping with his left foot to hit the DT in his left armpit, or to slide up his ribs into that armpit.  Try for a knockdown and then the TE can release to 2nd level.

If the DT's pad level stays low, the TE can't come up with his own shoulder to make the hit, but just hit the DT anywhere in that side; if the TE can fall on the DT's back and push him down in such a case, fine.  Whatever does the job.


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jtrent64
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I assume the ball is going outside the TE?  Why would the T step with his left foot? 0 Split, T steps with the Right, TE steps with the left, they will naturally be hip to hip.


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Bob Goodman
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Posted by: @jtrent64

I assume the ball is going outside the TE?  Why would the T step with his left foot? 0 Split, T steps with the Right, TE steps with the left, they will naturally be hip to hip.

True, but shawnm said the DT was head up on the T.


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ZACH
 ZACH
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We step with playside foot first unless we have a gap/down assignment, the angle of that step is dependant on the defender we attack. 

 

The combo with T and TE vs a 4. 

Tackle splits crotch with first step, second steps brings playside arm with shiver strike with backside hand in an under technique.  

TE steps laterally toward the 4 to prevent the hard slant. Second step brings backside hand to shiver at sternum and playside arm to near armpit in the under.

 

If there isn't anything wider than a 4 we would chip the 4 with the TE and go second level.  But if we wanted to double the 4 with a tight end  this is how we would go.

I can explain it to you, I can't understand if for you.


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shawnm
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Topic starter  

On power, we are GOD playside with zero splits.    

My understanding of a 6" step is that you are able to get your center of gravity or weight over that first step which gives you good reaction force to slam the opposite shoulder into the defender as that 2nd step comes down.   

As far as a TE doubling on the 4-tech from a zero split I was contemplating a playside step instead of a down/backside step to maximize hit power as I describe above.  However as Dave said "Why would you cross step?"   Makes me think the TE should just step first with that foot closest to the 4 Tech. 

Plus its not very expensive to practice with a left foot step for right side of the line and a right foot step for the left side when their rule is GOD.    These are non-select 6th graders.       


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